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  • Posts

    • That’s a side effect, but no. It’s harder to do both engine and vehicle platform at the same time than it is to have them alternate in cadence.    but that’s kinda true of all major projects with large separate components.
    • I actually assumed it was more about extracting more money out of a vehicle/platform. Brand new vehicles will spike sales, even with an old engine. Then in a year or two they add a new engine to spike sales again. Rinse and repeat. 
    • Ultium is a sound concept but GM's execution has been terrible. I would equate it to Alfa's rollout of the Giorgio platform that went horribly, but if you think about it, it has parallels. Have you not noticed that no manufacturer, not GM, not Toyota, not VW, ever rolls out a truly all-new car?   When a new platform comes out, they usually carry over powertrains or pluck a newer powertrain that has been running in some other vehicle for a few years. Then, once they're 2 years in, there is an engine'/transmission update.  You used to be able to set your watch to the "All new Camry with same engine" / 2 years later / "Camry gets all new engine" / 3 years later / "All new Camry with the same engine" cadence.   The reason for that is that it is incredibly difficult to set up a whole vehicle platform AND engine / transmission platform all at the same time. The latest "all-new" CR-V came out in 2022, but the engine platform dates back to 2014 when it debuted in a mid-cycle refresh of an overseas market Honda Fit. And that is why the Alfa Romeo Giorgio platform had so many issues at the beginning.  The Giorgio, which debuted under the Giulia and later the Stelvio, was the first truly "all-new" vehicle we've had in decades. It was a new platform, on a new production line, with a new engine. The only off-the-shelf component in that car was the ZF 8-speed automatic. These days, Giorgio seems to be doing just fine as the Jeep Grand Cherokee and Grand Cherokee L Now take that task and multiply it by 10.  Not only did GM build a new platform, they built a new powertrain, and a new battery pack, and then they had to build the plants to build that battery pack, which they'd never done before. They called in LG for help, but it is still a massive undertaking. The early Teslas were utter rubbish (some would argue they aren't much better today). Worse than anything GM is experiencing at the moment.  GM, for all its faults, at least had the wisdom to stop production so the issues could be addressed instead of pushing out sub-par beta-test products like Tesla did.  Keep in mind that the earliest Tesla Model-Ses are now 12 years old, one year OLDER than my Avalanche. I've been in a battery presentation for Ultium, and I do believe that GM is on the right track.  Their modular design makes it easy to future-proof the design for new chemistries as they become available.  They'll get there, they're further ahead on the curve than Tesla was 12 years ago simply because, unlike Tesla, they can make a door that shuts properly.
    • Owners of Ford Mustang Mach-E and F-150 Lightning vehicles have nearly doubled their charging location options overnight with 15,000+ new chargers added to the Ford BlueOval Charge Network.  Last May, Ford announced they signed an agreement with Tesla for Ford EVs to gain access to Tesla Supercharger locations.  Currently, the access is limited to just the two retail EVs that Ford sells and not the commercially oriented Ford e-Transit van.  A Ford representative indicated that a future announcement for e-Transit drivers could be coming. In addition to access to the Tesla network, Ford will begin transitioning its EVs to use the new Tesla-designed NACS plug that is backward compatible with the existing Tesla design. Ford vehicles already built and sold with the CCS plug are eligible for a complimentary NACS to CCS adapter from Ford.  Owners may register their VIN to receive their adapter in the Ford Pass app or at ford.com/FastChargingAdapter. Owners are allowed one free adapter per VIN. Charging a Mustang Mach-E or F-150 Lightning takes just two steps.  Plug the adapter into the vehicle and plug the Supercharger cable into the plug in a simple Plug-to-Charge process.  Drivers are charged for their session directly through the BlueOval network with whatever payment method is already set up. While 15,000+ Tesla Superchargers are available for Ford drivers' use, not every Tesla charger is compatible. Tesla Superchargers that have peak rates of 250+ kilowatts (kW) and an all-black charge cord and handle are compatible with Ford EVs.  L2 Destination chargers and 150kW stations with a silver collar on the charge plug are not compatible. View full article
    • Since I'm a spelling fanatic, I was just picking up on the aXLe transpo.  And capitalized on it to incorporate AXEl Foley.  I only saw the first one.  Every one knows all the lines to this skit.  Inimitably funny.  
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