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    July 2012 Honda/Acura


    American Honda Reports July Auto Sales: CR-V Sets Seventh Consecutive Monthly Sales Record; Acura RDX Sales Up More Than 142 Percent

    Honda division sales up 46.4 percent, Acura sales up 36.4 percent

    08/01/2012 - TORRANCE, Calif.

    American Honda today reported July 2012 U.S. sales of 116,944 units, an increase of 45.3 percent compared with July 2011 (an increase of 57.4 percent based on the daily selling rate*). The Honda Division posted July 2012 sales of 104,119 units, an increase of 46.4 percent compared with July 2011. Acura’s U.S. July sales of 12,825 units increased 36.4 percent compared with July 2011.

    Honda

    • Honda division posts best seventh-month year-to-date sales total since 2008
    • Accord sales pace strong at 28,639 units, up more than 70 percent; Civic sales up more than 78 percent with 25,004 units sold
    • CR-V sets seventh consecutive monthly sales record with a new July record (20,554 units), up more than 47 percent from July 2011
    • Odyssey sales up more than 88 percent from July 2011, with 11,953 units sold in July

    "As our sales momentum continues to build through the summer, Honda is experiencing its best year-to-date sales in four years," said John Mendel, American Honda executive vice president of sales. "With success growing along with inventory, it's wonderful to once again be able to meet the strong retail customer demand for our great Honda products."

    Acura

    • Continuing its sales success, the new RDX delivered another record sales month (2,664 units), up more than 142 percent from July 2011
    • MDX remains the top selling Acura vehicle with sales of 4,288 units, up more than 24 percent from July 2011
    • Gaining momentum in only its second full month of sales, the all-new ILX posted sales of 1,410 units

    "With the MDX continuing its reign as the top seven-passenger luxury SUV, and the new RDX leading the compact luxury segment, Acura light trucks lead the way for the Acura brand," said Jeff Conrad, vice president of Acura sales. "With the ILX gaining its stride, Acura is sure to see robust sales increases for many months to come."

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