Jump to content
  • William Maley
    William Maley

    Tesla's Upcoming Model Y To Use Model 3 Platform

      There has been a change of plans for the upcoming Model Y

    Tesla CEO Elon Musk made a surprise announcement earlier this year with the upcoming Model Y crossover using a new platform and not the one used for the Model 3. Musk has changed his tune, however.

    “Upon the council of my executive team . . . who reeled me back from the cliffs of insanity—much appreciated—the Model Y will in fact be using substantial carryover from Model 3 in order to bring it to market faster,” said Musk during the second quarter earnings call yesterday.

    How much faster? Previously, Musk said the Model Y (if that is the final name) could arrive by 2019. But during this call, Musk did not give a date - possibly a wise idea.

    Source: Autoblog, Car and Driver

    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments



    12 minutes ago, smk4565 said:

    480,000 reservations for the Model 3 as of August 2, 2017.

    So in this world of yours, sedans are selling better than CUVs? 

     

    Oh and they had 65,000 cancellations. 

    6 minutes ago, Cubical-aka-Moltar said:

    The crossover would probably have 800k reservations in today's market.

    Exactly my point. 

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    1 hour ago, smk4565 said:

    480,000 reservations for the Model 3 as of August 2, 2017.

    During the earnings call Musk answered the question about reservations and cancellations.

    http://www.thedrive.com/tech/13163/63000-people-have-cancelled-their-tesla-model-3-reservations-so-far

    They had 518,000 reservations at the start of the year and have now had 63,000 cancellations so far leaving them with 455,000 reservations. If this stays steady, then expect another 63,000 cancellations leaving them with 392,000.

    Yes I am sure they might get a few more reservations but now that people see the production auto and see the limited options, I kinda doubt they will get much more and expect them to close out the year under 400K reservations.

    Clearly the difference between 480,000 and 455,000 is a big one. Where did you get this number?

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Quote

    480,000 reservations for the Model 3 as of August 2, 2017.

    On 8/1/2017 at 1:53 PM, balthazar said:

    I doubt half have been cancelled- I would believe 15% from the initial placement... but now that hard numbers are out there WRT $, I expect it to edge up from that some. I think it's realistic to guess 25%.

    480,000 / 63000 = 13%

    Let's see where it goes from here.

    Edited by balthazar
    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    23 minutes ago, Cubical-aka-Moltar said:

    Probably will be over 500k by Labor Day..

    Doubt it, but maybe, Musk says 1800 people a day are making reservations. that is only 32 days away or 57,600 and if the number is true then you have 455,000 + 57,600 = 512,600 but then minus those cancellations which is 63,000 from Jan 1st to July 31st. So take 63,000 divided by 212 days = 297.169 cancelations per day.

    32 days times 297.169 = 9,509.4339 cancelations.

    512,600 - 9,509 = 503,091 so you may be right, but also I really doubt Musk is getting 1,800 reservations a day. I still expect the reservations to be below 400,000 by the end of the year and only about 20 to 30,000 model 3's actually delivered.

    29 minutes ago, balthazar said:

    480,000 / 63000 = 13%

    Let's see where it goes from here.

    Would it not be 63,000 / 455,000 = 13.8%

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    If they even sell 200,000 Model 3's next year that would be more than the 3-series ever sold in a year.  At 350,000 they are at Camry and Accord levels, which are the best selling sedans in the US.  If sedan sales look bad now, wait till next year when the Model 3 takes a huge chunk of them.

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    11 minutes ago, surreal1272 said:

    They will not, I repeat, will not sell 200K Model 3s in one year. 

    Agreed, since the Tesla S & X sold 46,000 last year, If they can double that number to 46,000 Tesla S & X and 46,000 Tesla 3 for 2018 they will be doing good I think.

    Since they have clarified that they will be adding a Tesla Y CUV on the Tesla 3 platform, I think they really are pushing just how many auto's they can build.

    • Upvote 1
    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    5 hours ago, smk4565 said:

    If they even sell 200,000 Model 3's next year that would be more than the 3-series ever sold in a year.  At 350,000 they are at Camry and Accord levels, which are the best selling sedans in the US.  If sedan sales look bad now, wait till next year when the Model 3 takes a huge chunk of them.

    Thinking people are going to get tired of waiting...and their money may go to someone else....

    • Upvote 1
    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    14 hours ago, balthazar said:

    Anyone going to be surprised to see Model Y pre-ordering opened up in short order? Like before the end of 2017?

    Yes, a way to keep money for those fleeing the extra long wait for a Tesla 3 and really wanting a CUV. With all the other OEM's bringing out CUV's over the next 12 months, I think Tesla's cake is going to be eaten!

    9 hours ago, daves87rs said:

    Thinking people are going to get tired of waiting...and their money may go to someone else....

    Exactly, OEM's over the next 12 months will have various new CUV EV's. Tesla missed this boat big time as the Tesla 3 CUV should have been first not the car. Plus other options without long waits will have people going back to their favorite auto dealer.

    19 minutes ago, Cubical-aka-Moltar said:

    Wouldn't surprise me....Next Big Thing for Tesla...

    Only way to keep the cash flow going to prop up the company.

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    When are all these electric CUVs arriving?  Audi and Mercedes are targeting 2019, they are 2 years away.   The Buick Bolt is probably a year or two away and if it is the size of a Bolt, will be a lot smaller than a Model Y.  It's not like Lexus has an electric RX for $40k coming in 6 months.  Even if the Model Y is 2019, they aren't really behind the curve and they do already sell an electric SUV.

     

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    "No one buys" mercedes plug-ins - Bolt is moving SIX TIMES all MB EVs combined monthly.
    That's likely to continue no matter how Daimler repackages it. Meanwhile MB is just conceding more & more ground to General Motors by refusing to get serious about the segment and fix the uncompetitive models they already have out.

    • Upvote 1
    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    48 minutes ago, balthazar said:

    "No one buys" mercedes plug-ins - Bolt is moving SIX TIMES all MB EVs combined monthly.
    That's likely to continue no matter how Daimler repackages it. Meanwhile MB is just conceding more & more ground to General Motors by refusing to get serious about the segment and fix the uncompetitive models they already have out.

    Mercedes is making 10 electric vehicles.  I hope the Bolt and its Buick sibling can take on all 10.  Mercedes has also had a battery factory under construction, GM does not have a battery factory like Tesla and Mercedes do.

    I think the electric Mercedes will sell, they don't even advertise any of their plug ins, plus a plug in is not an EV.   The real EVs are coming in 2019 and we'll see what they got.  Which to my original point, who has an electric SUV now besides Tesla and people are critizicng Tesla for lack of electric suvs.

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    6 minutes ago, smk4565 said:

    Mercedes is making 10 electric vehicles.  I hope the Bolt and its Buick sibling can take on all 10.  Mercedes has also had a battery factory under construction, GM does not have a battery factory like Tesla and Mercedes do.

    I think the electric Mercedes will sell, they don't even advertise any of their plug ins, plus a plug in is not an EV.   The real EVs are coming in 2019 and we'll see what they got.  Which to my original point, who has an electric SUV now besides Tesla and people are critizicng Tesla for lack of electric suvs.

    Just stop. Tesla is just like every other make out there and every other make has prioritized CUVs over sedans because that is what's selling. To pretend otherwise is just an obvious case of bias to suit your argument of the day. 

     

    "Cadillac needs seven CUVs to compete"

     

    "Tesla doesn't need a CUV to compete"

     

    That's how you're coming off right now. 

     

    Finally, no one has an electric SUV including Tesla. They have an electric CUV and so does GM. 

    • Upvote 1
    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    1 hour ago, smk4565 said:

    When are all these electric CUVs arriving?  Audi and Mercedes are targeting 2019, they are 2 years away.   The Buick Bolt is probably a year or two away and if it is the size of a Bolt, will be a lot smaller than a Model Y.  It's not like Lexus has an electric RX for $40k coming in 6 months.  Even if the Model Y is 2019, they aren't really behind the curve and they do already sell an electric SUV.

    Latest news that I have read is showing that the german brands and a few asian brands along with Volvo are planning to roll out production version during the 2017-2018 auto shows with production and on sale in late 2018 at 2019 models. Even MB your superior brand has updated their news that their first EV will launch at dealerships in late Q3 or early Q4 of 2018 which means we will see it announced at one of the major shows during the 2017-2018 show time frame.

    End result is that Tesla is going to find it very hard very soon as other auto companies offer EV CUV's that people want and many will pass on waiting years to get a Tesla compared to buying MB, BMW, Audi, Volvo, Jaguar, GM, Ford, etc.

    • Upvote 1
    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    2 hours ago, smk4565 said:

    Mercedes is making 10 electric vehicles.  I hope the Bolt and its Buick sibling can take on all 10. 

    Bolt is ALREADY taking ALL 4 of MB's plug-ins on, right now.

    July '17~
    Bolt : 1,971
    Volt : 1,518
    total ~ 3,833
    ALL 4 MB plug-ins : 344

    So if 4 MB plug-ins average 86 sales each/mnth, 10 would be 860/mnth.

    I hope MB can take on all of the Bolt with their 10 vehicles.

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites



    Join the conversation

    You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




  • Similar Content

    • By David
      According to an interview done by Steve Fowler at Auto Express UK, Thierry Bollore the new CEO of Jaguar Land Rover is considering taking Jaguar pure EV to be a Tesla / Polestar competitor and would start with the new Baby Jaguar concept they built. This is a Tesla 3 sized luxury 4 door sedan.


      This comes after so many stories about the Flagship XJ EV being postponed as they focus on ICE auto's. Jaguar has confirmed that due to the success of their i-Pace CUV, they are moving forward with delivery of the XJ EV in 2021.
      Castle Bromwich will be home to all electric auto's that they make including the Road biased Range Rover EV. This comes after sales of the Jaguar XE dropped 28% in 2019. As such, the board with new CEO leadership feels it needs to aggressively move to an all new replacement of the XE with this all electric baby Jaguar.
      Jaguar management is also closely watching Polestar and especially their Polestar 2 EV. 
      The all new MLA EV platform would allow replacements of the E-Pace and F-Pace to be a priority once the XE and XJ are launched.
      Jaguar according to the story is on pace to launch plug-in hybrids of the E & F Pace that will get a facelift along with a move to a Hybrid as a stop gap measure till they are replaced with EVs.
      There are also talks of a smaller electric Jaguar as Jaguar has signed letters of agreement to work with BMW on a electric version of the BMW 1 & 2 series that will go electric and this would bring in a much smaller footprint Jaguar below the XE and i-Pace.
      A big question is that the F-Type sports car while being considered a must by some executives on the Board could fall to the history bin as it only sold 6,000 in the last financial year globally making it the second worst performing auto in their portfolio behind the XJ which will come out next year in the dramatic clean sheet design.
      https://www.autoexpress.co.uk/jaguar/353006/new-baby-electric-jaguar-take-tesla-model-3
    • By William Maley
      Nearly two years ago, I drove the then all-new Hyundai Kona crossover at a press event. It was a unique looking vehicle that was entering the growing subcompact crossover class. Out of the three Hyundai vehicles I drove, the Kona impressed me most with its performance and value for money. But if there is something I have learned over eight years with reviewing vehicles, is that I can’t take first impressions as final. It has been a long wait, but I finally got my hands on a 2020 Kona Ultimate AWD. Let’s see if my first impression can still hold up.
      The Outer Limits (of Exterior Design)
      You may be forgiven for thinking that the Kona has just arrived in a UFO from Planet Nine due to its shape. But Hyundai knew they needed to make a splash in what is becoming a very competitive class. Designers took some influence from the Jeep Cherokee with a rounded front end and the front lights being separated into daytime lights and headlights. Another design trait is the slit that sits between the grille and hood cutline. Finishing off the look is body cladding running along the lower edge and a bright green paint color only available on the turbo engine models. It may seem like an odd mashup of ideas, but it works surprisingly well.
      A Conventional Interior
      Some will be disappointed that Hyundai didn’t continue the wacky design for the Kona’s interior. But having an interior that is user friendly will always pull ahead of interesting design. That isn’t to say Hyundai hasn’t added some special touches such as vent surrounds and seat stitching matching the exterior color. Hard plastics are used throughout, but they don’t feel hollow or cheap when you run your hand across.
      There is a fair amount of space for those sitting upfront. Comfort is ok for short trips, but I found myself wanting more thigh support on longer trips. In the back, there is a large amount of headroom for most passengers. Legroom is a different story as tall people will find their knees pressed against the front seats. Cargo space is another area where the Kona is lacking. With the rear seats up, the Kona’s cargo area measures 19.2 cubic feet - about 0.1 cubic feet more than the Toyota C-HR. Fold them down and space increases to 45.8. This trails the likes of the Chevrolet Trax, Nissan Kicks, and Honda HR-V.
      The One To Still Be Beaten (Infotainment-wise)
      The Kona Ultimate comes equipped with an eight-inch touchscreen featuring Hyundai’s infotainment system. This system has consistently been one of my favorites as Hyundai nails the basics - simple interface, blazing-fast performance, and having features such as Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. My only complaint is that the design is starting to look dated when compared to other automakers and their updated infotainment. 
      Turbo Power!
      Two powertrains are available in the Kona. SE, SEL, and SEL Plus use the 2.0L four-cylinder offering 147 horsepower and 132 pound-feet of torque. It’s paired with a six-speed automatic. Limited and Ultimate come with the turbocharged 1.6L four producing 175 horsepower and 195 pound-feet. This is paired with a seven-speed dual-clutch transmission. Front or all-wheel drive is available for either engine.
      Zippy is the word to describe the performance of the turbo engine. The Kona easily accelerates away from a stop and has no issue with passing a slower vehicle. The dual-clutch transmission seems to stumble when leaving a stop, but does get itself together at higher speeds. I also found the transmission is slow to react when your floor the throttle, taking a few milliseconds to downshift.
      EPA fuel economy figures for the 1.6T with AWD are 26 City/29 Highway/27 Combined. My average for the week landed around 26.7 mpg, mostly due to cold weather during the week I had the Kona.
      Woah, This Crossover Handles
      If you wanted a subcompact crossover that handled decently, your choices were either the Mazda CX-3 or Toyota C-HR. The Kona enters the ring as the third choice, and possibly the best. On the backroads, the Kona feels quite agile and has almost no body roll. If I was to nitpick, the steering doesn’t have as much feel as you’ll find in the CX-3. But it feels noticeably better than the C-HR. Ride quality is impressive with most bumps being isolated from passengers sitting inside. Not too much wind and road noise come inside.
      Possibly the Best Subcompact Crossover At the Moment
      Hyundai has a very compelling package in the Kona. There is an excellent performance from the turbocharged engine, impressive driving dynamics, easy to use infotainment system, and a long list of standard equipment. There are some drawbacks with the small cargo area and rear legroom topping the list. If you need the space, a Honda HR-V would be my first pick. The dual-clutch transmission still needs a bit more work to iron out the hesitation issues I experienced. 
      That first impression I had still stands and moves the Kona not only being the best in the class at the moment, but also onto a very rarefied list; a vehicle I would considering buying.
      How I Would Configure A Kona: The only reason I see buying the Ultimate is for the adaptive cruise control as most of the other safety equipment such as blind spot monitoring, parking sensors, and forward collision avoidance are available on other models. So if I wanted the Turbo engine, then I would step down to the Limited at $26,100. For those who think that is a tad expensive still should consider the SEL Plus as it comes very well equipped for $23,950. You do sacrifice the turbo engine for the 2.0L four-cylinder which is fine if your planning to drive mostly around town. Add an additional $1,400 for all-wheel drive.
      Disclaimer: Hyundai Provided the Kona, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2020
      Make: Hyundai
      Model: Kona
      Trim: Ultimate
      Engine: 1.6L Turbocharged DOHC 16-Valve GDI Four-Cylinder
      Driveline: Seven-Speed Dual-Clutch, All-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 175 @ 5,500
      Torque @ RPM: 195 @ 1,500 - 4,500
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 26/29/27
      Curb Weight: 3,276 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Ulsan, South Korea
      Base Price: $29,150
      As Tested Price: $ 30,380 (Includes $1,095.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Carpeted Floor Mats - $135.00

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      Nearly two years ago, I drove the then all-new Hyundai Kona crossover at a press event. It was a unique looking vehicle that was entering the growing subcompact crossover class. Out of the three Hyundai vehicles I drove, the Kona impressed me most with its performance and value for money. But if there is something I have learned over eight years with reviewing vehicles, is that I can’t take first impressions as final. It has been a long wait, but I finally got my hands on a 2020 Kona Ultimate AWD. Let’s see if my first impression can still hold up.
      The Outer Limits (of Exterior Design)
      You may be forgiven for thinking that the Kona has just arrived in a UFO from Planet Nine due to its shape. But Hyundai knew they needed to make a splash in what is becoming a very competitive class. Designers took some influence from the Jeep Cherokee with a rounded front end and the front lights being separated into daytime lights and headlights. Another design trait is the slit that sits between the grille and hood cutline. Finishing off the look is body cladding running along the lower edge and a bright green paint color only available on the turbo engine models. It may seem like an odd mashup of ideas, but it works surprisingly well.
      A Conventional Interior
      Some will be disappointed that Hyundai didn’t continue the wacky design for the Kona’s interior. But having an interior that is user friendly will always pull ahead of interesting design. That isn’t to say Hyundai hasn’t added some special touches such as vent surrounds and seat stitching matching the exterior color. Hard plastics are used throughout, but they don’t feel hollow or cheap when you run your hand across.
      There is a fair amount of space for those sitting upfront. Comfort is ok for short trips, but I found myself wanting more thigh support on longer trips. In the back, there is a large amount of headroom for most passengers. Legroom is a different story as tall people will find their knees pressed against the front seats. Cargo space is another area where the Kona is lacking. With the rear seats up, the Kona’s cargo area measures 19.2 cubic feet - about 0.1 cubic feet more than the Toyota C-HR. Fold them down and space increases to 45.8. This trails the likes of the Chevrolet Trax, Nissan Kicks, and Honda HR-V.
      The One To Still Be Beaten (Infotainment-wise)
      The Kona Ultimate comes equipped with an eight-inch touchscreen featuring Hyundai’s infotainment system. This system has consistently been one of my favorites as Hyundai nails the basics - simple interface, blazing-fast performance, and having features such as Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. My only complaint is that the design is starting to look dated when compared to other automakers and their updated infotainment. 
      Turbo Power!
      Two powertrains are available in the Kona. SE, SEL, and SEL Plus use the 2.0L four-cylinder offering 147 horsepower and 132 pound-feet of torque. It’s paired with a six-speed automatic. Limited and Ultimate come with the turbocharged 1.6L four producing 175 horsepower and 195 pound-feet. This is paired with a seven-speed dual-clutch transmission. Front or all-wheel drive is available for either engine.
      Zippy is the word to describe the performance of the turbo engine. The Kona easily accelerates away from a stop and has no issue with passing a slower vehicle. The dual-clutch transmission seems to stumble when leaving a stop, but does get itself together at higher speeds. I also found the transmission is slow to react when your floor the throttle, taking a few milliseconds to downshift.
      EPA fuel economy figures for the 1.6T with AWD are 26 City/29 Highway/27 Combined. My average for the week landed around 26.7 mpg, mostly due to cold weather during the week I had the Kona.
      Woah, This Crossover Handles
      If you wanted a subcompact crossover that handled decently, your choices were either the Mazda CX-3 or Toyota C-HR. The Kona enters the ring as the third choice, and possibly the best. On the backroads, the Kona feels quite agile and has almost no body roll. If I was to nitpick, the steering doesn’t have as much feel as you’ll find in the CX-3. But it feels noticeably better than the C-HR. Ride quality is impressive with most bumps being isolated from passengers sitting inside. Not too much wind and road noise come inside.
      Possibly the Best Subcompact Crossover At the Moment
      Hyundai has a very compelling package in the Kona. There is an excellent performance from the turbocharged engine, impressive driving dynamics, easy to use infotainment system, and a long list of standard equipment. There are some drawbacks with the small cargo area and rear legroom topping the list. If you need the space, a Honda HR-V would be my first pick. The dual-clutch transmission still needs a bit more work to iron out the hesitation issues I experienced. 
      That first impression I had still stands and moves the Kona not only being the best in the class at the moment, but also onto a very rarefied list; a vehicle I would considering buying.
      How I Would Configure A Kona: The only reason I see buying the Ultimate is for the adaptive cruise control as most of the other safety equipment such as blind spot monitoring, parking sensors, and forward collision avoidance are available on other models. So if I wanted the Turbo engine, then I would step down to the Limited at $26,100. For those who think that is a tad expensive still should consider the SEL Plus as it comes very well equipped for $23,950. You do sacrifice the turbo engine for the 2.0L four-cylinder which is fine if your planning to drive mostly around town. Add an additional $1,400 for all-wheel drive.
      Disclaimer: Hyundai Provided the Kona, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2020
      Make: Hyundai
      Model: Kona
      Trim: Ultimate
      Engine: 1.6L Turbocharged DOHC 16-Valve GDI Four-Cylinder
      Driveline: Seven-Speed Dual-Clutch, All-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 175 @ 5,500
      Torque @ RPM: 195 @ 1,500 - 4,500
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 26/29/27
      Curb Weight: 3,276 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Ulsan, South Korea
      Base Price: $29,150
      As Tested Price: $ 30,380 (Includes $1,095.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Carpeted Floor Mats - $135.00
    • By William Maley
      Hyundai can’t seem to stop itself from tinkering with the Santa Fe crossover. This is apparent when you consider the nameplate first debuted on compact crossover in the early 2000s before growing into a two-model family up until last year. Hyundai has made another drastic change to the Santa Fe by making it a single model again - the three-row Santa Fe XL has been replaced by the Palisade. Does this re-focus make the model competitive?
      The overall shape of the 2019 Santa Fe is more upright than the outgoing Santa Fe Sport. This solves one of the biggest issues I had with the Sport, poor visibility. The upright shape and flatter belt line allowed Hyundai designers to increase the amount of glass used. Not only does this improve overall visibility. This also makes the interior feel more airy. Up front, Hyundai uses a hexagonal grille that is flanked by a split headlight layout. Slim LED daytime running lights sit on either side of the grille, while a pod housing the headlights sit underneath.
      Where the Santa Fe really shines is the interior. It’s a modern and clean design with a two-tone dashboard, unique fabric covering the pillars and headliner; and the use of polygons in the seat pattern and speaker grilles. Materials for the most part are soft-touch plastics and leather on my Ultimate tester. There are some hard plastics used here and there, but it will not detract from the premium feel Hyundai is going for. The layout for the controls is excellent with all in easy reach for driver or passenger. Also earning top marks is the eight-inch infotainment system which is simple to use, provides snappy performance, and allows a driver to use either Apple CarPlay or Android Auto.
      For those sitting up front, the Santa Fe Ultimate provides power adjustments, heat, and ventilation. Getting settled in and finding the correct position, I found the seats to be quite comfortable with enough padding to tackle any trip length. Back seat passengers will find plenty of leg and headroom. Those sitting in the back will also appreciate the rear seats can recline along with heat during the cold winter months. Cargo space is about average with 35.9 cubic feet with the rear seats up and 71.3 when folded.
      Most Santa Fes will come with the base 2.4L inline-four with 185 horsepower. My Ultimate AWD tester featured the optional turbocharged 2.0L inline-four with 235 horsepower. Both engines come paired with an eight-speed automatic. Whenever a Hyundai vehicle is equipped with a turbo-four, it falls into one of two camps - works perfectly or there is a performance issue. The Santa Fe falls into the latter. There is a noticeable amount of turbo-lag when leaving from a stop. Once up to speed, the engine can sometimes be a bit too responsive with a jumpiness that makes smooth acceleration a difficult task. Whether this is something with the programming of the engine, transmission, or throttle, I cannot say. I hope this gets fixed with the 2020 model.
      EPA fuel economy figures for the turbo-four with AWD are 19 City/24 Highway/21 Combined. I saw an average of 20.7 mpg during my week of testing. It should be noted this is the same as the Honda Passport with its slightly more powerful 3.5L V6 producing 280 horsepower.
      The Santa Fe’s ride is still smooth and relaxing over many of the bumps and imperfections that dot the roads of Metro Detroit. It is also surprisingly quiet with barely any wind or road noise coming inside. Handling is where the Santa Fe really surprised me as it felt agile when driven around a bend. There was barely any body roll and steering provided excellent response. 
      On the surface, the 2019 Santa Fe is an improvement over the Santa Fe Sport. It features a fetching design, comfortable ride, simple tech, and a lot of equipment for the money. My Ultimate tester came with an as-tested price of $39,905 and that includes adaptive cruise control with stop & go; blind spot monitoring, Infinity premium audio system, panoramic sunroof, and much more. Build up one of the Santa Fe’s competition to similar specs and you’re looking at spending on average around $5,000 more.
      But the Santa Fe is soured by the turbocharged 2.0L four-cylinder engine which appears to have two settings - slow off the line performance and unpredictable acceleration at higher speeds. Until Hyundai can figure out what is going on, stick with the base 2.4L four-cylinder. It may be a little bit underpowered, but at least it is more consistent in its power delivery.
      Disclaimer: Hyundai Provided the Santa Fe, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2019
      Make: Hyundai
      Model: Santa Fe
      Trim: Ultimate
      Engine: Turbocharged 2.0L GDI 16-Valve DOHC CVVT Four-Cylinder
      Driveline: Eight-Speed Automatic, All-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 235 @ 6,000
      Torque @ RPM: 260 @ 1,450 - 3,500
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 19/24/21
      Curb Weight: 4,085 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Montgomery, Alabama
      Base Price: $38,800
      As Tested Price: $39,905 (Includes $980.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Carpeted Floor Mats - $125.00
    • By William Maley
      Hyundai can’t seem to stop itself from tinkering with the Santa Fe crossover. This is apparent when you consider the nameplate first debuted on compact crossover in the early 2000s before growing into a two-model family up until last year. Hyundai has made another drastic change to the Santa Fe by making it a single model again - the three-row Santa Fe XL has been replaced by the Palisade. Does this re-focus make the model competitive?
      The overall shape of the 2019 Santa Fe is more upright than the outgoing Santa Fe Sport. This solves one of the biggest issues I had with the Sport, poor visibility. The upright shape and flatter belt line allowed Hyundai designers to increase the amount of glass used. Not only does this improve overall visibility. This also makes the interior feel more airy. Up front, Hyundai uses a hexagonal grille that is flanked by a split headlight layout. Slim LED daytime running lights sit on either side of the grille, while a pod housing the headlights sit underneath.
      Where the Santa Fe really shines is the interior. It’s a modern and clean design with a two-tone dashboard, unique fabric covering the pillars and headliner; and the use of polygons in the seat pattern and speaker grilles. Materials for the most part are soft-touch plastics and leather on my Ultimate tester. There are some hard plastics used here and there, but it will not detract from the premium feel Hyundai is going for. The layout for the controls is excellent with all in easy reach for driver or passenger. Also earning top marks is the eight-inch infotainment system which is simple to use, provides snappy performance, and allows a driver to use either Apple CarPlay or Android Auto.
      For those sitting up front, the Santa Fe Ultimate provides power adjustments, heat, and ventilation. Getting settled in and finding the correct position, I found the seats to be quite comfortable with enough padding to tackle any trip length. Back seat passengers will find plenty of leg and headroom. Those sitting in the back will also appreciate the rear seats can recline along with heat during the cold winter months. Cargo space is about average with 35.9 cubic feet with the rear seats up and 71.3 when folded.
      Most Santa Fes will come with the base 2.4L inline-four with 185 horsepower. My Ultimate AWD tester featured the optional turbocharged 2.0L inline-four with 235 horsepower. Both engines come paired with an eight-speed automatic. Whenever a Hyundai vehicle is equipped with a turbo-four, it falls into one of two camps - works perfectly or there is a performance issue. The Santa Fe falls into the latter. There is a noticeable amount of turbo-lag when leaving from a stop. Once up to speed, the engine can sometimes be a bit too responsive with a jumpiness that makes smooth acceleration a difficult task. Whether this is something with the programming of the engine, transmission, or throttle, I cannot say. I hope this gets fixed with the 2020 model.
      EPA fuel economy figures for the turbo-four with AWD are 19 City/24 Highway/21 Combined. I saw an average of 20.7 mpg during my week of testing. It should be noted this is the same as the Honda Passport with its slightly more powerful 3.5L V6 producing 280 horsepower.
      The Santa Fe’s ride is still smooth and relaxing over many of the bumps and imperfections that dot the roads of Metro Detroit. It is also surprisingly quiet with barely any wind or road noise coming inside. Handling is where the Santa Fe really surprised me as it felt agile when driven around a bend. There was barely any body roll and steering provided excellent response. 
      On the surface, the 2019 Santa Fe is an improvement over the Santa Fe Sport. It features a fetching design, comfortable ride, simple tech, and a lot of equipment for the money. My Ultimate tester came with an as-tested price of $39,905 and that includes adaptive cruise control with stop & go; blind spot monitoring, Infinity premium audio system, panoramic sunroof, and much more. Build up one of the Santa Fe’s competition to similar specs and you’re looking at spending on average around $5,000 more.
      But the Santa Fe is soured by the turbocharged 2.0L four-cylinder engine which appears to have two settings - slow off the line performance and unpredictable acceleration at higher speeds. Until Hyundai can figure out what is going on, stick with the base 2.4L four-cylinder. It may be a little bit underpowered, but at least it is more consistent in its power delivery.
      Disclaimer: Hyundai Provided the Santa Fe, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2019
      Make: Hyundai
      Model: Santa Fe
      Trim: Ultimate
      Engine: Turbocharged 2.0L GDI 16-Valve DOHC CVVT Four-Cylinder
      Driveline: Eight-Speed Automatic, All-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 235 @ 6,000
      Torque @ RPM: 260 @ 1,450 - 3,500
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 19/24/21
      Curb Weight: 4,085 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Montgomery, Alabama
      Base Price: $38,800
      As Tested Price: $39,905 (Includes $980.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Carpeted Floor Mats - $125.00

      View full article
  • Posts

    • It's an impressive beast.    Visually, I find it quite attractive. BMW bikes just kind of do it for me.  right now....falling off the wagon buying things myself. Setting up a home stereo with decent used components, and negotiating on antoher large heavy woodworking tool I have no bisness owning. 
    • Only have ridden it 3 times so far because of the weather here, but I'm getting more comfortable with it. The clutch is heavy, I'm going to need to do hand exercises or just ride it a heck of a lot more to work up the muscles in my left hand.  I brought it to work this morning so I can drop it off for state inspection. Thinking back, this is the biggest bike I think I've ridden, maybe not the heaviest, but certainly the largest engine and most powerful.  It's a lot of bike and I'm still getting used to it. One of the nicest things that makes me glad I bought it is that once I'm rolling, it doesn't really matter what gear I'm in, I can just roll on the throttle and go without having to downshift. Love the torque.
    • The only reason ICE vehicles considerably increased in costs is because now active safety systems became standard.  That alone increased costs of all vehicles by at least $3-5k.  Before active safety systems came into play the yearly increase in vehicle cost was only few hundreds at most to compensate for the inflation. The price disparity between comparable  ICE and BE vehicle is still significant and so far doesn't seem to decrease.  It might change in the future, but as of right now it is a valid argument.  It is a dead horse argument already but so is getting daily bombarded about other side of the argument which you seems to ignore.  
  • Social Stream

  • Today's Birthdays

    1. F&K
      F&K
      (57 years old)
  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • My Clubs

About us

CheersandGears.com - Founded 2001

We ♥ Cars

Get in touch

Follow us

Recent tweets

facebook

×
×
  • Create New...