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    Toyota Revises Their Powertrain Plans


    William Maley

    Staff Writer - CheersandGears.com

    October 3, 2012

    Besides hybrid powertrains, Toyota's powertrain line has been lacking some key features that competitors are now offering. Those features include direct-injection, Continuously Variable Transmissions (CVT), and turbochargers to balance performance and fuel economy.

    According to Autoweek, Toyota will be adding those features to their lineup over the next few weeks. At the moment, Toyota employs direct-injection in the Scion FR-S, Lexus GS, and LS: But in the next two years, Toyota will introduce two new engines,

    • 2.5L Atkinson cycle engine for hybrids (Next Year)
    • 2.0L turbocharged (2014)

    Toyota will also add direct-injection to certain number of vehicles including the Camry and Venza.

    Also coming to Toyota vehicles will be more CVTs, and six- and eight-speed transmissions for its bigger cars.

    Source: Autoweek

    William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.

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    They don't lead in much of anything other than sales to people who don't care about what they drive.

    The FRS/BRZ is mostly a subie prodeuct, and the rest of the Scion lineup is back of the pack bad....

    Camry is bland as dead wood...

    W

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    when they give their bulk entry car something competitive (corolla) like a 6 speed and more than only the 1.8L, then "we" might sit up interested again, maybe not for the styling, but because maybe they are moving forward (and not just with the prius, or lexus)

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