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    Quick Drive: 2015 Lexus ES 300h


    • Does Hybrid Power Make the ES More Appealing?

    Late last year, I had the chance to pilot the 2014 Lexus ES 350. In my review I said that while the new ES is a noticeable improvement over the old one, competitors such as the Buick LaCrosse have surpassed it. But Lexus has an possible ace up their sleeve and it happens to be the hybrid version of ES. Not many competitors offer a fuel efficient version, so does it give the ES an edge?

     

    What differentiates the ES 300h from the ES 350? Not much from the exterior aside from blue tint on the badge, hybrid badges on the door sills, and the"h" on the rear badge. The interior is the same aside from a new instrument cluster with an eco/power gauge and a EV mode button. One item I do have to call out on the ES 300h’s interior is the optional Bamboo trim. Not only is it sharp looking, but adds a nice touch of class to the interior.

     

    Power comes from Lexus’ Hybrid Drive system which pairs a 2.0L four-cylinder and a electric motor producing a total output of 200 horsepower. A CVT sends power to the front wheels. This powertrain seems more attune the ES’ mission of providing a smooth and quiet ride. The powertrain is able to get the vehicle moving without much stress or noise in city traffic. Merging onto freeway or trying to make a pass does reveal some noisy clatter from the engine. The CVT doesn’t help matters as the drone that plagues many CVTs when you push further down on the accelerator pedal comes in. Fuel economy for the ES 300h is rated 40 City/39 Highway/40 Combined. My week saw an average of 37 MPG. This was slightly disappointing, but at the time I was driving the ES Hybrid, temps were below freezing which would explain the drop.

     

    As for ride and handling, the ES 300h follows in the footsteps of the standard ES 350. The suspension provides a smooth ride. Any imperfections on the road are dealt with and don’t make they way into the cabin. Also not making an appearance inside the cabin is road and wind noise, Thanks to thicker windows and added insulation, the ES is a very quiet car. Helping matters is one of the smoothest transitions from hybrid power to electric power. The only way to know that the hybrid system has kicked on or off is a EV Mode light in the instrument cluster. If your planning to tackle the winding roads, then leave the ES Hybrid at home. Like the standard ES, the hybrid shows a bit of body roll and steering doesn’t have any sign of feel.

     

    If I was considering an ES, I would go for the 300h since it fits the ideals of the model - a quiet and comfortable ride paired with a somewhat upscale cabin. Add in the fuel economy and the ES 300h might be a compelling choice for those who just want something luxurious. But for almost the same price as this ES 300h, you can get into a fully loaded Toyota Avalon Hybrid which offers most of the same features as the ES, along with a much better look and a more sporty drive if you are interested in that. So while the ES 300h does give a slight edge to ES, it gets undercut by another member of the family.

     

    Disclaimer: Lexus Provided the ES300h, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas

     

     

    Year: 2015
    Make: ES
    Model: 300h
    Trim: N/A
    Engine: 2.5L DOHC, 16-Valve with VVT-i Four-Cylinder, Electric Motor
    Driveline: Front-Wheel Drive, CVT
    Horsepower @ RPM: (Gas) 156 @ 5,700, (Total) 200
    Torque @ RPM: (Gas) 156 @ 4,500
    Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 40/39/40
    Curb Weight: 3,660 lbs
    Location of Manufacture: Miyawaka, Fukuoka
    Base Price: $40,430
    As Tested Price: $46,995 (Includes $925.00 Destination Charge)

     

    Options:
    Hard Disk Drive Navigation system with Backup Camera - $1,795
    Luxury Package - $1,370
    HID Headlamps - $565.00
    Blind Spot Monitoring with Rear Cross Traffic Alert - $500.00
    Intuitive Parking Assist - $500.00
    Power Trunk Closer - $400.00
    Bamboo & Leather Trimmed Steering Wheel - $300.00
    Power Rear Sunshade - $210.00

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    Interesting, sounds like a tad better than the ES350 but not by much.Such a bland exterior / Interior even with the wood accents, still looks 1980's to me.

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    Interesting, sounds like a tad better than the ES350 but not by much.Such a bland exterior / Interior even with the wood accents, still looks 1980's to me.

    Nice review.  We don't see a lot of Lexus around here (or any luxury brands other than  Cadillac and Lincoln), so it's nice to now how some of them compare to non luxury options like the Avalon, too.  I'm not going to lie, this sounds like a great tool to help me sell an Avalon if it is equal to or better than it's luxury sibling.  Unfortunately we just don't sell too many of those, anyway.  When we do they definitely trend towards an older crowd.  In fact I would say the current Avalon customer is basically the old image of a Buick customer, since the ES has an even homelier visage I would imagine that it would invite an even older crowd yet.  Sounds like Lexus needs to work a bit on their styling with this one.  I don't worry so much about the handling bit, this wasn't meant to be a canyon carver and I'm sure it is plenty adequate for what it's meant to be (though I would be interested in how those bits compare to it's main rivals), so from reading this and looking at pictures it seems like the visuals are the biggest knock on this car, besides the way it is undercut by the Avalon.  Great review, thanks!

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    Bamboo trim has another advantage - It is ecologically friendly because it is a highly renewable resource. Probably a big reason it is on the hybrid car.... the green conscious drivers don't have to feel bad about chopping down old-growth trees just to have wood trim in their hybrid.   I wish more auto makers would use bamboo. 

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    I really like the wood-trim used in the top of the line GS and LS models. It's some really nice stuff. I think either C/D or MT said that the wood portion of the steering wheel was the most smoothly polished wood grain they'd ever grasped with their hands. 

     

    The wood is like treated 5-6 times to get that finish. It's really an excellent trim choice for a car south of a S550 S-Class.

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    And it comes in exciting beige!

     

    Bamboo can be stained any color you might like.

     

    I meant the outside of the car.  Seems like every Camry, Avalon and ES is sold in wallpaper paste beige.   I guess to match the hearing aides of their owners.

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    Lexus owners must be a happy bunch. The reason why. There cars still looks basically the same 10 years in a row with changes so small and subtle most owners will never notice them. As is the case with this car. Pull off a little chrome, give is a semi  predator  grille and make it as plain boring and generic as ever and literally no one will ever notice. Ditto the beige exterior. That says it all!

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