Jump to content
  • William Maley
    William Maley

    Review: 2014 Hyundai Accent SE

    Sign in to follow this  

      Sitting In The Middle

    At one time, the subcompact was seen as the penalty box in the automotive marketplace. The reasons for buying one were the low cost and high fuel economy. But in return, subcompacts were devoid of many comforts found in larger vehicles such as air conditioning, power windows, and automatic transmissions. Now subcompacts are seen as a real choice in the marketplace and automakers have had to step up to make their models feel like an actual vehicle. One of the automakers who has made this change was Hyundai. Their entrant in the subcompact marketplace, the Accent, was the poster child of the no frills, cheap commuting vehicle. But with the most recent model, Hyundai has moved it up the food chain to better compete with the likes of the Chevrolet Sonic, Ford Fiesta, and Honda Fit. But does the Accent belong in this playground, or is it just a pretender?

    There are two ways you can describe the Accent Hatchback’s design. One is that the model is quite boring and plain looking when compared to other subcompacts. The other way is to say the Accent Hatchback is sophisticated and matured. The Accent doesn’t have quite the flair of the fludic sculpture as other models, but does feature some sculpted curves along the doors, a distinctive character line running from the front fender to the rear, and a set of sixteen-inch alloy wheels that come standard on the SE model.

    Much like the exterior, the Accent Hatchback’s interior can be described as being plain or classy. Like most subcompacts, the Accent does feature its fair share of hard plastics. But the plastic is very solid and Hyundai used textured plastics on certain parts of the interior to make it feel somewhat premium. The center stack is well laid out and easy to glance at. My Accent SE tester came very well-equipped with Bluetooth, iPod and USB connections, tilt and telescoping steering wheel, and satellite radio all as standard.

    One complaint I have with Hyundai and Kia vehicles is the lack of thigh support in the front seat when sitting in them for long periods. The Accent falls into this category as well. I don’t know if it's the way I have the seats adjusted or if there isn’t enough padding on the seat that causes this for me. Moving to the back, the Accent Hatchback does pretty well in this regard with a decent amount of head and legroom. Being 5’7”, I was very comfortable sitting in the back. Cargo space stands at 21.2 cubic feet with the seats up and 47.5 cubic feet which puts its in the mid-pack of the subcompact class.

    All Accents come equipped with a 1.6L DOHC four-cylinder producing 138 horsepower and 123 pound-feet of torque. This is paired up to a six-speed automatic. The Accent does take a little bit of wringing to get to the sweet spot in the powertrain. But when you’re leaving a stop, it doesn’t feel like the vehicle is gasping for power. Hyundai made sure it was very easy to get up speed on city streets. On the fuel economy front, the Accent SE is rated by the EPA at 27 City/37 Highway/31 Combined. My week’s average landed around 30 MPG.

    The Accent’s ride quality feels like a bigger vehicle with the suspension doing an excellent job of minimizing impacts from bumps and potholes. Noise isolation is also pretty decent with wind and road noise kept to a minimum. Those who are thinking of taking the Accent on their favorite road will be slightly disappointed. The Accent doesn’t quite have the same handling characteristics as the Chevrolet Sonic as it leans a little bit more and doesn’t quite feel as solid. Steering is light, but has a decent amount of feel for those who feel on going a sporting drive.

    The 2014 Hyundai Accent SE shows that it belongs in this playground. While it might not have the looks or driving dynamics as many of the subcompact competitors, the Accent has some positives to it. It begins with a fair number of standard equipment, followed by a engine that delivers very good grunt and a ride that feels like a bigger vehicle. It’s a very compelling choice in the class.

    Disclaimer: Hyundai Provided the Accent SE, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas

    Year: 2014

    Make: Hyundai

    Model: Accent Hatchback

    Trim: SE

    Engine: 1.6L DOHC GDI Four-Cylinder

    Driveline: Six-Speed Automatic, Front-Wheel Drive

    Horsepower @ RPM: 138 @ 6,300

    Torque @ RPM: 123 @ 4,850

    Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 27/37/31

    Curb Weight: 2,635 lbs

    Location of Manufacture: Ulsan, Korea

    Base Price: $17,395

    As Tested Price: $18,315 (Includes $810.00 Destination Charge)

    Options:

    Carpeted Floor Mats - $110.00

    William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached atwilliam.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.

    Sign in to follow this  


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    Decent write up and what appears to be a decent commuter car. Clearly not a long distance trip car though.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Nicer than the Corolla for sure.

     

    Not sure about that one.. Considering I drove one a few weeks after the Accent. Review incoming.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Nice little car.

     

    We rented one from Enterprise in Austin, TX with 3 miles on it and baby ice blue color. Clearly a small, economical car, but it felt decent, very solid, smooth and the touch points were good. Lacking power but so is everything in the class, and it had XM satellite on and cranking.

     

    Hyundai's never win the driving dynamics race, but this little one isn't bad at all. How much do they cost anymore, anyway?

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Join the conversation

    You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




  • Similar Content

    • By William Maley
      I’ve driven my fair share of Challengers on both extremes - from the standard V6 to the high-performance SRT and Hellcat models. But I never had any time behind the wheel of the R/T with its 5.7 V8. That changed in the summer when a bright orange Charger R/T Shaker was dropped off for a week. This allowed me to ask a question that has been sitting in my head for some time: Is the R/T the best bang for your buck in the Challenger family?
      The Shaker sets itself apart from other Challenger models with the use of a ‘Shaker’ scoop that prominently pops up from the hood. There is also a blackout treatment on several trim pieces and wheels that make it look even more imposing on the road. Along with the scoop, the Shaker package does add a new cold-air intake seated right in front of the driver’s side corner. This addition should boost the output of the 5.7L HEMI V8 (372 horsepower and 400 pound-feet of torque when paired with the eight-speed automatic. But FCA’s spec sheet doesn’t say anything about the Shaker Package adding more oomph or not. When you first start up the R/T Shaker, it makes presence known with a deep and loud exhaust note. I had to do a double-take the first time as I was wondering if I was given either an R/T Scat Pack or a Hellcat by mistake. While it may lack the high power numbers of the 6.4 and supercharged 6.2 V8s, the 5.7 is no slouch. 60 mph comes in at just over five seconds and power is seemingly available at any speed. My tester came with the optional Performance Handling Group that adds upgraded springs, sway bars, and a set of Bilstein shocks. This does improve the handling by a fair amount with less body roll. But it doesn’t feel nimble due to a curb weight of around 4,158 pounds. The steering has a quick response, but there is a noticeable lack of road feedback. If you want your muscle car to have some handling, consider the Camaro or Mustang. Nothing new to report on the Challenger’s interior. It still has the angled center stack, retro-inspired gauges, and easy to use UConnect infotainment system. The seats are where the Challenger loses some points as it feels like you’re sitting on top of cinderblocks. The Shaker package is surprisingly good value, adding $2,500 to the base price of the R/T which begins at $34,295. But you’ll need to be careful on the option sheet, or you’ll end up with something quite expensive. My tester came with an as-tested price of $46,555, which is $300 more than an R/T Scat Pack Widebody with the 6.4 HEMI V8.  The Dodge Challenger is getting up there in age and sadly cannot compete with the likes of the Camaro and Mustang in terms of handling. But Dodge is still able to offer a lot of performance in the form of the R/T. With a potent V8 engine, old school styling, and different packages like the Shaker to make your Challenger stand out, the R/T is possibly the best value and well-rounded model in the lineup. Disclaimer: Dodge Provided the Challenger, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2019
      Make: Dodge
      Model: Challenger
      Trim: R/T
      Engine: 5.7 HEMI VVT V8 Engine
      Driveline: Eight-Speed Automatic, Rear-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 372 @ 5,200
      Torque @ RPM: 400 @ 4,400
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 16/25/19
      Curb Weight: 4,158 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Brampton, Ontario
      Base Price: $34,295
      As Tested Price: $46,555 (Includes $1,495.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      "Shaker" Package - $2,500.00
      TorqueFlite Eight-Speed Automatic Transmission - $1,595.00
      Performance Handling Group - $1,495.00
      Driver Convenience Group - $1,295.00
      Power Sunroof - $1,295.00
      UConnect 4C Nav with 8.4-inch Display - $1,095.00
      Alpine Sound Group with Subwoofer - $995.00
      Shakedown Graphics - $495.00

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      I’ve driven my fair share of Challengers on both extremes - from the standard V6 to the high-performance SRT and Hellcat models. But I never had any time behind the wheel of the R/T with its 5.7 V8. That changed in the summer when a bright orange Charger R/T Shaker was dropped off for a week. This allowed me to ask a question that has been sitting in my head for some time: Is the R/T the best bang for your buck in the Challenger family?
      The Shaker sets itself apart from other Challenger models with the use of a ‘Shaker’ scoop that prominently pops up from the hood. There is also a blackout treatment on several trim pieces and wheels that make it look even more imposing on the road. Along with the scoop, the Shaker package does add a new cold-air intake seated right in front of the driver’s side corner. This addition should boost the output of the 5.7L HEMI V8 (372 horsepower and 400 pound-feet of torque when paired with the eight-speed automatic. But FCA’s spec sheet doesn’t say anything about the Shaker Package adding more oomph or not. When you first start up the R/T Shaker, it makes presence known with a deep and loud exhaust note. I had to do a double-take the first time as I was wondering if I was given either an R/T Scat Pack or a Hellcat by mistake. While it may lack the high power numbers of the 6.4 and supercharged 6.2 V8s, the 5.7 is no slouch. 60 mph comes in at just over five seconds and power is seemingly available at any speed. My tester came with the optional Performance Handling Group that adds upgraded springs, sway bars, and a set of Bilstein shocks. This does improve the handling by a fair amount with less body roll. But it doesn’t feel nimble due to a curb weight of around 4,158 pounds. The steering has a quick response, but there is a noticeable lack of road feedback. If you want your muscle car to have some handling, consider the Camaro or Mustang. Nothing new to report on the Challenger’s interior. It still has the angled center stack, retro-inspired gauges, and easy to use UConnect infotainment system. The seats are where the Challenger loses some points as it feels like you’re sitting on top of cinderblocks. The Shaker package is surprisingly good value, adding $2,500 to the base price of the R/T which begins at $34,295. But you’ll need to be careful on the option sheet, or you’ll end up with something quite expensive. My tester came with an as-tested price of $46,555, which is $300 more than an R/T Scat Pack Widebody with the 6.4 HEMI V8.  The Dodge Challenger is getting up there in age and sadly cannot compete with the likes of the Camaro and Mustang in terms of handling. But Dodge is still able to offer a lot of performance in the form of the R/T. With a potent V8 engine, old school styling, and different packages like the Shaker to make your Challenger stand out, the R/T is possibly the best value and well-rounded model in the lineup. Disclaimer: Dodge Provided the Challenger, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2019
      Make: Dodge
      Model: Challenger
      Trim: R/T
      Engine: 5.7 HEMI VVT V8 Engine
      Driveline: Eight-Speed Automatic, Rear-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 372 @ 5,200
      Torque @ RPM: 400 @ 4,400
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 16/25/19
      Curb Weight: 4,158 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Brampton, Ontario
      Base Price: $34,295
      As Tested Price: $46,555 (Includes $1,495.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      "Shaker" Package - $2,500.00
      TorqueFlite Eight-Speed Automatic Transmission - $1,595.00
      Performance Handling Group - $1,495.00
      Driver Convenience Group - $1,295.00
      Power Sunroof - $1,295.00
      UConnect 4C Nav with 8.4-inch Display - $1,095.00
      Alpine Sound Group with Subwoofer - $995.00
      Shakedown Graphics - $495.00
    • By Drew Dowdell
      Model Sales
      Vehicle
      Dec-19
      Dec-18
      2019 YTD
      2018 YTD
      Accent
      2,311
      3,830
      25,628
      29,090
      Elantra
      18,720
      15,076
      175,094
      200,415
      Ioniq
      1,164
      1,275
      19,574
      15,076
      Kona
      6,678
      8,319
      73,326
      47,090
      Nexo
      15
      8
      267
      44*
      Palisade
      5,654
      0
      28,736
      0
      Santa Fe
      10,350
      11,347
      127,373
      117,038
      Sonata
      7,105
      8,705
      87,466
      105,118
      Tucson
      11,224
      15,384
      137,381
      142,263
      Veloster
      712
      1,161
      12,849
      10,871
      Venue
      787
      0
      1,077
      0
       
      Dec-19
      Dec-18
      2019 YTD
      2018 YTD
      Hyundai
      64,720
      65,107
      688,771
      667,634
    • By Drew Dowdell
      My wheels for the week are a 2020 Toyota Corolla XLE sedan. This one is well equipped with Toyota Safety Sense now standard, Toyota Entune with Apple CarPlay, Adaptive lighting system with automatic high beams, headed seats, and a JBL Premium audio system. It is rated for 29 city / 37 highway and we'll be putting that highway number to the test. We will be taking the Corolla to Northern Virginia for the weekend to visit family for the holidays. 
      The XLE differs from the 2019 Corolla SE hatchback that @William Maley recently tested in that it has the 1.8 liter engine instead of the 2.0 liter. This engine puts out 139 horsepower at 6100 RPM and 126 lb-ft of torque at 3900 rpm. About a 30 horsepower deficit compared to the SE.
       In my initial drive, I found the car to be snappy around town, but things got a little raucous when I went to merge onto the highway. Though it is a CVT, it has a fixed first gear. The fixed first gear does take away from the rubber band feeling most CVTs have. I took the Corolla on a set of twisty roads that I take all test vehicles on and the sedan, while no sports car, felt firmly planted and predictable around the curves. 
      One thing that is surprising is the sticker price; $28,084 for a Corolla without even the biggest engine seems quite steep. 
      So while I'm loading up the trunk with Christmas cheer, fire off any questions you have about the 2020 Toyota Corolla XLE.


      View full article
    • By Drew Dowdell
      My wheels for the week are a 2020 Toyota Corolla XLE sedan. This one is well equipped with Toyota Safety Sense now standard, Toyota Entune with Apple CarPlay, Adaptive lighting system with automatic high beams, headed seats, and a JBL Premium audio system. It is rated for 29 city / 37 highway and we'll be putting that highway number to the test. We will be taking the Corolla to Northern Virginia for the weekend to visit family for the holidays. 
      The XLE differs from the 2019 Corolla SE hatchback that @William Maley recently tested in that it has the 1.8 liter engine instead of the 2.0 liter. This engine puts out 139 horsepower at 6100 RPM and 126 lb-ft of torque at 3900 rpm. About a 30 horsepower deficit compared to the SE.
       In my initial drive, I found the car to be snappy around town, but things got a little raucous when I went to merge onto the highway. Though it is a CVT, it has a fixed first gear. The fixed first gear does take away from the rubber band feeling most CVTs have. I took the Corolla on a set of twisty roads that I take all test vehicles on and the sedan, while no sports car, felt firmly planted and predictable around the curves. 
      One thing that is surprising is the sticker price; $28,084 for a Corolla without even the biggest engine seems quite steep. 
      So while I'm loading up the trunk with Christmas cheer, fire off any questions you have about the 2020 Toyota Corolla XLE.

  • Posts

    • Different views for different people adapting and adopting different hurdles of and for different fuel propulsions.   Like I said in another post, its up to the people to decide for themselves how much and how far they are to accept and change for EVs.  In my neck of the woods, the citizens, the government, the local businesses and our local economy are on the same page regarding EVs. Its to everybody's benefit in our community for us to adapt and adopt EVs.  Ill agree with the "who gives a phoque what Koenigsegg thinks", but Koenigsegg doesnt really build pedestrian family sedans therefore not really slamming his own products.    PS:  I dont give a phoque what he thinks of the Tesla Model 3 myself if I wasnt clear enough.  But...Ill say this about that...HIS attention to detail in his products are second to none in the automotive business. Tesla...not so much.  Well....the electronics and software and stuff, Tesla is second to none. The finishing details...are admittedly lacking. The world IS full of small inconveniences and  God Bless capitalism for allowing everybody a more or less equal chance of profiting from that.  But then again...unchecked capitalism is also responsible for incredulous business practises.   Is a 9000 dollar option for AWD one of these incredulous instances?  A fool and his money and buyer beware are two of my favorite sayings.  I dont know about anybody else though, if they share those thoughts...   But then again, capitalism does dictate market value for some of these things some find incredulous. Others find need and pay for it negating the negative feed back... Tesla products are luxury only in price and the luxury in question is the technology.  Luxury as in precious metals and excessive comfort is not a Tesla quality.  State of the art technology however...        
    • I wonder if anyone actually gives a shit what Koenigsegg thinks about 'the best pedestrian family sedan'. Also, isn't his comment more a slam of his own product?? - - - - - "The world is full of small inconveniences that people simply profit off of." says guy in $57,000 car where AWD cost $9000. BTW, shouldn't a self-proclaimed "luxury" car have more than 5 paint colors (and 4 colors other than white are $1000 more, and the red is $2000 more) and 2 wheels to choose from?? The same basic Red Tintcoat on a 400% larger GMC Sierra is like $500.
    • There are definitely hurdles to mass adoption of EVs..  will be interesting to see how the reality is in 5 years, 10 years...
    • Article just barely brushes over the #1 issue- purchase price, quickly dismissing it with "there may be an initial price premium". Ya think? And what of depreciation- that albatross somehow limited only to IC vehicles? These are the lion's share of the cost to own an EV, and it's patently ignored here. It's actually more likely it's MORE expensive than you think.
  • Social Stream

  • Today's Birthdays

    1. 67impss
      67impss
      (60 years old)
    2. Darrell Knee
      Darrell Knee
      (65 years old)
  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • My Clubs

About us

CheersandGears.com - Founded 2001

We ♥ Cars

Get in touch

Follow us

Recent tweets

facebook

×
×
  • Create New...