mustang84

Long-Term '06 Sonata Test

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Is the 100,000 mile warranty really worth it?

2006 Hyundai Sonata LX -Third-Quarter Update

AutoWeek | Published 10/17/06, 12:10 pm et

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After half of a year of mostly around-town driving in our long-term 2006 Hyundai Sonata, the third quarter brought some serious long-distance running—and uncovered a passel of previously unnoticed problems. On one hand, this speaks highly of Sonata’s value as a commuter car. Conversely, if you plan long trips or face a substantial daily drive to work, you might want to think again when weighing the Sonata’s price advantage over more competent competitors in the midsize segment.

“The ride is adequate, but there are elements of under-controlled body motion that at first seem inconsequential but contribute to that sense of road burn at the end of a long day at the wheel,” noted the staffer. And steering through long mountainous sweepers required constant steering adjustments.

“It doesn’t take a set and stay on track,” the editor complained.

Inside, materials and equipment that seem reasonable to anyone driving short distances begin to wear thin after a few miles in the saddle. In particular, the passenger seat is punishing not only for its lack of height or tilt adjustment, but also for its poor positioning and thigh support that tend toward dumping the passenger into the footwell instead of holding the rider in the shotgun seat.

Finally, quietness tends to disappear on longer jaunts, where road roar and suspension bump-thumping pervade the cabin.

“Hyundai needs to set some of its development engineers on a long cross-country trip in America to experience these differences for themselves,” our tester suggested.

http://www.autoweek.com/apps/pbcs.dll/arti...E/61011003/1011

Edited by mustang84

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Not surprising in the least. I called this car as rental material, the sales show its rental material, and now these reviews show its rental material.

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duh, who couldn't see this coming>?

oh, the hordes of camry banging, CR humping, "I want to a buy a Toyota but I want to outsmart society so I will buy something equal to toyota but is cheaper, with a longer warranty and MADE in the good ole US of A by NON UNION God fearing people because we don't want to support any companies that have blaoted union structures because we are against business inefficiencies, Detroit, preserving our own economic strength worldwide, and we just think those scrappy upstart Koreans are really darn cute in their zeal and all while screwing us blind" kinds of people.

People who are trying to latch on to the 'next big thing' because somebody told them so.

Do you think SOMEDAY folks will revisit the positives of American marques? Or do they just continuously need to get the next big Asian car thing out of their systems all the time?

Bet this car starts to fall apart 3 days after the end of their test period. I bet half these Sonatas don't outlast the 6 year loans they were bought on.

Edited by regfootball

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I have noticed how poorly these Korean cars are holding up on the used car lots. Scruffy looking wheels, broken pieces of plastic, worn off paint here and there, rattles etc. I even saw a used 2002 Sonota that was starting to rust in the rear wheel wells and a Kia minivan that had a rusting tailgate.

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I have noticed how poorly these Korean cars are holding up on the used car lots. Scruffy looking wheels, broken pieces of plastic, worn off paint here and there, rattles etc. I even saw a used 2002 Sonota that was starting to rust in the rear wheel wells and a Kia minivan that had a rusting tailgate.

212569[/snapback]

exactly, the stuff the buff books never report about.

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My nephew traded a VW for a hyundai a couple of years ago. The VW suffered much more deteriation than has the Hyundai. Some of the scuffiness you observe on the used car lots represents the kind of people that buy super cheap cars.

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I rode in a 2006 Sonata. At high speeds. On the highway. I was scared.

Seriously, the interior was WAY cheap. Everything felt "wrong" and looked even wronger. It's the warranty that sold this car to the guy I worked with, nothing more, nothing less.

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NOt that I want to defend Hyundai, but I have long maintained that poor maintenance and benign neglect have oft haunted GM products, too.

If someone looks at a Camry and it will set them back $30K (Canadian, guys, don't have a fit!) and the same Malibu will cost them $27k, yet a Sonata is $25k but that is all they can afford, I am convinced there is a psychological wedge there and the person simply doesn't look after the vehicle. Let's face it - if you deliberately spend $5k more on the Camry, you are damned well going to wash it, wax it and look after it!

This could help explain why many used Hyundais look so bad. Plus, a lot of them were leased because they were cheap and then driven into the ground!

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NOt that I want to defend Hyundai, but I have long maintained that poor maintenance and benign neglect have oft haunted GM products, too.

  If someone looks at a Camry and it will set them back $30K (Canadian, guys, don't have a fit!) and the same Malibu will cost them $27k, yet a Sonata is $25k but that is all they can afford, I am convinced there is a psychological wedge there and the person simply doesn't look after the vehicle.  Let's face it - if you deliberately spend $5k more on the Camry, you are damned well going to wash it, wax it and look after it!

  This could help explain why many used Hyundais look so bad.  Plus, a lot of them were leased because they were cheap and then driven into the ground!

212714[/snapback]

Agreed on the basis of how many utterly lousy Daewoos I've seen. In reference to cars like the Camry (and Accord), they are the types of cars people wash when they get it for free with an 8gal fillup. The less passion a car inspires, the less appreciative an owner is. I've seen Cutlass Cieras in better condition than '02+ Camries.

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But this is where the domestics versus import debate gets interesting. Was the Ciera a better built vehicle, or was it the age/financial backing of the buyers of the Oldsmobile that had the means/wherewithal to look after their vehicles?

It is an interesting thesis. For example, look at how many '65 Impalas are still on the road. Can you find any '65 wagons? Were they any less well built? Or were they just driven into the ground?

Camry/Accord buyers have been brainwashed into taking their vehicles to the dealer, where for all intents and purposes the vehicle eventually gets rebuilt. GM and Ford have always been pretty lenient that way (if you told my dad 35 years ago that he MUST take his '69 300 in to the dealer for an oil change, he would've bought a Pontiac!) and many vehicles NEVER go back to the dealer, which means that service bulletins, etc. may never get addressed.

I know that around here many "new Canadians" are buying used Toyotas (and I do mean USED Toyotas) because they are told by their fellow countrymen that Toyotas are better, but these people have no money so the cars are looking pretty ratty, indeed.

Frankly, you just don't see that many older Hyundais around here. They can't take the salt!

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I rode in a 2006 Sonata.  At high speeds.  On the highway.  I was scared.

Seriously, the interior was WAY cheap.  Everything felt "wrong" and looked even wronger.  It's the warranty that sold this car to the guy I worked with, nothing more, nothing less.

212711[/snapback]

what i've been always saying, Hyundai's sales have been driven entirely by that one thing. Just like why my sister bought hers.

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But this is where the domestics versus import debate gets interesting.  Was the Ciera a better built vehicle, or was it the age/financial backing of the buyers of the Oldsmobile that had the means/wherewithal to look after their vehicles?

  It is an interesting thesis.  For example, look at how many '65 Impalas are still on the road.  Can you find any '65 wagons? Were they any less well built?  Or were they just driven into the ground?

  Camry/Accord buyers have been brainwashed into taking their vehicles to the dealer, where for all intents and purposes the vehicle eventually gets rebuilt.  GM and Ford have always been pretty lenient that way (if you told my dad 35 years ago that he MUST take his '69 300 in to the dealer for an oil change, he would've bought a Pontiac!) and many vehicles NEVER go back to the dealer, which means that service bulletins, etc. may never get addressed.

  I know that around here many "new Canadians" are buying used Toyotas (and I do mean USED Toyotas) because they are told by their fellow countrymen that Toyotas are better, but these people have no money so the cars are looking pretty ratty, indeed.

  Frankly, you just don't see that many older Hyundais around here.  They can't take the salt!

212733[/snapback]

in my experience, GM products take the salt the best of any mfr. I was beyond shocked, my sister put 200,000+ on her Beretta in harsh MN climate and it still had no major rust problems when she FINALLY unloaded it. Nearly everyone else I know of with GM products in winter salt has outperformed most furrin competition.

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in my experience, GM products take the salt the best of any mfr.  I was beyond shocked, my sister put 200,000+ on her Beretta in harsh MN climate and it still had no major rust problems when she FINALLY unloaded it.  Nearly everyone else I know of with GM products in winter salt has outperformed most furrin competition.

212744[/snapback]

got to agree there. around here (greater cleveland) there are large numbers of 15-20 yr old ford and gm cars, but the korean and japanese cars don't seem to get past 10 yrs before they start colapsingunder their own weight. my old winter beater 91 grand marquis is still going, 250k and finally has a rusthole in the lower left quarter. and i don't baky it at all. hasn't seen a carwash in at least 2 yrs. try that with a hyundai.

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