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It would be nice if Toyota would follow the ingenius marketing model of Ford.

Ford 500=Ford Taurus

Mercury Montego=Mercury Sable

Toyota Camry=Toyota Blandry

Honda Accord=Honda Imbored

LOL!

Edited by carman21

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It would be nice if Toyota would follow the ingenius marketing model of Ford.

Ford 500=Ford Taurus

Mercury Montego=Mercury Sable

Toyota Camry=Toyota Blandry

Honda Accord=Honda Imbored

LOL!

:scratchchin:

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Toyota isn't dumb.

True, Camry may be a VASTLY recognized name, but Corona reminds people of beer, and the kickbacks from the bottling company will offset the slight decrease in sales.

:P

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Not that anybody here cares, but Toyota actually did make a car called the Corona at one time:

Posted Image

At one time? The (Toyopet) Corona was only in production from 1957 to 2001. The last generation was the Corona Premio, which was replaced by a new sedan called simply Premio. The current model and it's Toyota sister car the Allion (formerly the Carina), and the corresponding Caldina wagon are at present lwb compacts like the new Civic—they fill the same niche and price segment at Toyota and Toyopet dealers as the Corolla does at Corolla dealers. The Scion tC, like earlier Celicas, is a coupe version (there was also a corresponding Corona coupe before the last Celica, which though nominally T-body like the Allion/Premio/Avensis was actually an E-body Corolla coupe like the earlier Levin). While Corolla dealers get the Camry and Netz dealers the European Avensis, Toyota and Toyopet dealers get either Crown or sportier Mark X (in it's first iteration the Corona Mark II—exported as the Cressida) rwd sedans respectively. Edited by thegriffon

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Not that anybody here cares, but Toyota actually did make a car called the Corona at one time:

Posted Image

Are those people dressed as pimples or part of a Twister mat?

Edited by AxelTheRed

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"American Customer, M and F. They shall be marked with red dot. Soon, everyone in America be marked with red dot. Behold the powuh of Corona!" <evil laugh with Japanese accent>

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O.B. :lol:

Corona was a cool name for a car. :P

Last time I saw one was in NY, NY in April of 2006 when I went there

to see the Camaro concept, it was sitting on a street like any beige

Corolla or Camry. I think it was like a 1970 or 1972. Looked mint.

There's also a few at local junkyards.

The Cressida was a cool name... and the Carina is worth a mention.

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Posted Image

This was when Toyota was making cars that did not completely suck in eevry way.

They were still the underdog and their niche stealing ideas off US manufacturers

so god-damn blatantly they'd brag about ti in their advertising.

I'd take a hardtop 1970s Toyota over any modern Toy-Lex made.

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Are those people dressed as pimples or part of a Twister mat?

Hard to say... I found it difficult to find a flattering picture of that car. :lol:

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I'd take a hardtop 1970s Toyota over any modern Toy-Lex made.

My wheelhouse is more 80s/90s, but I agree their older stuff killed what they do today. Much more passion to those cars. Corolla coupe/Sprinter, Supra, Celica, and MR2 were all cool stuff. Even the turbo truck and the older Land Cruisers. You had a real hunk of car worth playing with if you bought one...today, a Toyota is just another blandmobile, not to mention their brass and their customers like it that way.

I don't think it would be a half-bad move if the next Avalon was the Crown the rest of the world got.

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Posted Image

This was when Toyota was making cars that did not completely suck in eevry way.

My parents had a '79 Corona for a few months. It sucked in every way you can possibly imagine. The hedgasket blew repeatedly (even after regular oil changes) the hoses were constantly coming loose. The interior was falling apart the rear seatbelts didn't quite work the way they were supposed to (Aren't they supposed to PREVENT you from being flung forward in an accident?! Is THAT what they mean by "Moving Forward"?) It developed a hole in the radiator, but the thing that really turned it into scrap metal was when it dropped it's driveshaft on the 101 from the transmission side and completely ripped up the underside of the car. Replacing the entire transmission, chassis pan area, and surrounding damaged parts would have cost more than the piece of crap was worth, so it was totaled.

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Coronas are actually slotted between the Camry and the Corolla back then. Much like the Malibu, in between the Cobalt and Impala.

Not in this market. Camry was Corona's absolute replacement here. In Europe and Japan, Corona was a smaller car. Plus our first true midsize Camry (the '92) was Japan's Scepter, with their Camry also being a smaller car.

The first world Camry I remember was the last generation.

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I may be a bit confused, but wasn't the Corona (with lime) Toyota's bigger car here in the States, before the Cressida came along? Wasn't it just Corolla, Corona and Celica there for a while?

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I may be a bit confused, but wasn't the Corona (with lime) Toyota's bigger car here in the States, before the Cressida came along? Wasn't it just Corolla, Corona and Celica there for a while?

That's pretty much my recollection of Toyota's lineup, other than the trucks.

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So, in MI, when you decide to get rid of this new Corona.. will you still be able to get the 10 cents for recycling it?

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Until recently the Corolla was a subcompact. It's still smaller than the Premio (formerly Corona), but is now around the same price in the only market where both are sold. The Cressida was the export name for the (Corona) Mark II, a more premium model which remained rwd, competing with the Nissan Skyline. The Camry name was first attached to an extension of the Celica line (in name at least) and a sister car to the last rwd Carina. That car was replaced by the fwd V1 Camry in 1982, along with the Japan-only Camry Vista (later simply Vista) hardtop for the new Vista network (recently merged into the youth-oriented Netz network). 4 successive generations followed culminating in the V4 of 1994, however the V3 had earlier spawned a lwb widebody version for the American market—the V1 F, in Japan called the Scepter. In a similar manner the V4 A Camry spawned the American market V2 F Camry, called the Camry Gracia in Japan. Meanwhile the 2nd gen Camry spawned a more luxurious hardtop version called the Camry Prominent, as did the 3rd generation. This also spawned a lwb wide-body version, the first Lexus ES 300, or Toyota Windom. The V4 A was succed by the next wide-body American version, the V3 A, but the Vista survived one further generation (V5) before the Vista channel was merged into Netz, which gained the more-expensive, imported Avensis.

The first V-body fwd Camry started out a compact even smaller than the T14 Corona/Carina (in Japan a brief stop-gap rwd model on the older A-body platform of the previous Carina, Celica Camry and Celica coupe—a lwb version was the first Supra, at that time called the Celica XX in Japan), but the first fwd T15 Corona and Carina actually shrank (smaller than a Suzuki Aerio), despite having a longer wheelbase, and has remained smaller than the Camry ever since. T16 was a longer hardtop version (slightly longer, but lower than the new US Focus), effectively a 4-door version of the returning Corona coupe (notchback version of the T16 Celica). The T15 was followed by the T17 and corresponding T18 hardtop and coupe. The T19 Corona/Carina moved to a longer wheelbase in 1992 and the wagon versions merged into the Caldina, while the T20 coupes and hardtop sedans used a shorter version only slightly bigger than the T16/T18. The T21 Corona Premio and Carina were joined by the European T22 Avensis, while the T23 Celica switched to the Corolla platform. The T24 sedans became the Premio and Allion, still compacts (the Premio is less than an inch longer than the Cobalt, the Allion just an inch longer than the Civic), although on a longer 2700 mm wheelbase shared with the T24 Caldina and the European T25 Avensis, now a true (lower) midsize sedan. The new coupe version is the T1 Scion tC. Since the Corolla sedan is just as expensive as the Allion/Premio, but much smaller than its key rivals, I can't help thinking that the latter would be a better rival for the Civic and Sentra in markets where a sedan is favored over the hatchback.

The Camry surpassed the X-body rwd Cressida in size with the widebody V3, hence the need to develop a larger sedan, which although based on a stretched Camry platform, retained the X-body designation still used by the smaller rwd Mark II and the current Mark X.

The S-body Crown, although larger than the Mark X, is no bigger than the Camry. Even the larger V8 Crown Majesta is not much bigger, although it does accommodate Toyota's UZ- and UR-series V8 engines.

Edited by thegriffon

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