knightfan26917

Little Town Life

26 posts in this topic

I mentioned in the "I can only imagine" thread that I'd love to get a home on the outskirts of town or in the country or in a small town. I've lived "city life" (well, between Chicago-type city life and small town life, anyway) all of my life, except for when I was in college ... and the short time I lived in Nashville TN in 1996. I know some think it nuts to live in a small town, but the following, which was given to me by a family friend years ago, gives some of the reasons why I'd like to live in a small town. Course, room for a big garage ... and the idea of not having many "city ordinances" to contend with ... are big factors as well ... he he....

Life in a small town? If you've never lived there, you're going to read about it and protest, "Aw, get outta here." But, those who do live there would not trade with you.

A little town is where...

...everybody knows everybody else's car by sight, and also where and when it goes. [if it is a Monte Carlo in the greater Elgin area, I pretty much know this anyway ;).]

...when you get the wrong number, you can talk for 15 minutes (at least) anyhow.

...it's hard for anybody to walk to work for exercise, because it takes too long to stop and explain to people in cars who stop, honk, and offer you a ride.

...businessmen struggle for survival against city stores and shopping centers.

...those same businessmen dig deep to help with countless fund-raising projects.

...everyone becomes a neighbor in time of need.

...you don't have to lock your doors.

...some people even leave the keys in the car ignitions....

...city folks say there's nothing to do, but those who do live there don't have enough nights in the week to make all the meetings and get-togethers.

A little town? Believe it ... when all is said and done, it's a nice place to live.

How about you ... have any other ways to end the "A little town is where..." sentence?

Cort:33swm."Mr Monte Carlo.Mr Road Trip".pig valve.pacemaker

PICS:lego.HO.model.MCinfo.RT.CHD = http://www.chevyasylum.com/cort

"How much longer will they be around?" ... Don Williams ... 'Old Coyote Town'

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Sounds exactly like the little town I grew up close to. Only about 400 people, and I know all of them. Almost everyone in town leaves their car unlocked even though we are only 10 mintutes from Fargo. Even if they lock their car, there is usually a spare in the gas tank. I like living in the city now, but would move back out their in a heartbeat if I got the chance.

EDIT: Sorry Balthazar, I guess I did it somewhat unconscienciously, fixed though.

Edited by scharmer05
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scharmer05- a question: why quote the entire opening post (including sig) when you are post #2?? Some of us schlubs still have dial-up connections (imagine!) and the needless repetition only slows page loading down.

My family moved when I was 10, to a completely rural township: 3-4 miles away were 2 towns of about 2100 each. I have also lived in the city (Detroit & Baltimore)- and there is no comparison: give me rural life anyday.

Right now I am in the suburbs and it's OK, but if I could snap my fingers I'd move farther out into the boonies.

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I spent part of my childhood rural--lived on a 150-acre place in hilly eastern Ohio, 2 1/2 miles from the nearest town, which had about 250 people. I knew kids in town, went to elementary school there, my dad was the school superintendent, so my folks knew everyone..1 gas station in town, 1 resturant, 1 small grocery store.

When I was 8, my dad took a superintendents job in a larger town (about 30,000) fifty miles away, we bought a house there and split our time between both places...by the time I was 12, my dad retired, we bought a house in the Florida Keys and split time between there and the 'farm' (we didn't grow anything). Went to junior high and high school in Florida--small town of 3000 with a lot of retirees and part-time residents..interesting experience.

My mom still lives on the farm, my older brother nearby.

It was interesting as a kid, but as an adult I find it deadly dull...too isolated, too insular...but the garage space is great (on the farm, we have two 2 car garages and a barn--at one time, between my folks and my brother and I, we had 15 cars, a Winnebago, and a tractor there).

As an adult, I've lived in big cities (Chicago), college towns-- Ann Arbor, Kent), and decent-sized metro areas (Cleveland, Colorado Springs, Denver, Phoenix), and find I'd rather be in a metro area, either downtown or in close-in suburbs.

The isolation, lack of metro area amenities (no Starbucks, no Target, no ethnic restaurants, no bookstores, computer/electronics stores, etc within 50 miles) , the distance from airports (100 miles from Pittsburgh, Columbus, Cleveland), no software companies, make small towns or rural living unattractive to me at this stage of my life...

Edited by moltar
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As an adult, I've lived in big cities (Chicago), college towns-- Ann Arbor, Kent), and decent-sized metro areas (Cleveland, Colorado Springs, Denver, Phoenix), and find I'd rather be in a metro area, either downtown or in close-in suburbs.

The isolation, lack of metro area amenities (no Starbucks, no Target, no ethnic restaurants, no bookstores, computer/electronics stores, etc within 50 miles) , the distance from airports (100 miles from Pittsburgh, Columbus, Cleveland), no software companies, make small towns or rural living unattractive to me at this stage of my life...

Yeah, I can certainly understand that.

Sadly, with my health concerns, a small town, unless "relatively close" to a major hospital, is a bit out of the question....

Ah, well.

Hmm...one other thing I want to add ... and I'm not sure I could've written it better myself, so I quote ChevyTalk's DeeGee:

"A small town is my hometown, the place I'm from, the community that made me what I am; it's called Ames, and it's in Oklahoma. Oh, and I almost forgot. A small town is where your roots and the roots of a CT member from Illinois can converge in a BBQ restaurant 50 years and many miles later."

He is describing this:

http://www.chevyasylum.com/cort/1106/DSC07591r8_jpg.html

Cort:33swm."Mr Monte Carlo.Mr Road Trip".pig valve.pacemaker

PICS:lego.HO.model.MCinfo.RT.CHD = http://www.chevyasylum.com/cort

"The world rolls by a million miles away" ... James Taylor ... 'Our Town'

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I"ve lived in both large (Toronto & Vancouver) and small (Collingwood, Ontario; Bolton, Ontario) towns. I guess it depends on your view point. I am gay, so small towns can be a (no pun intended) drag :rolleyes: Even though many, many people in Collingwood (pop. at that time about 17,000) knew I was gay, it was good and bad. There were people who stayed away from my business because of this knowledge and there were people who supported my business because of this knowledge.

Growing up in Bolton during the early '70s, let me tell you the kids were pretty bored and got into a lot of bad stuff: break-ins, pot, you name it. When a friend of mine moved to Waubashene in '75 (pop. 300 or so) it was worse: most of the kids were sniffing glue, doing LSD or something. Personally, if I had kids (ha, ha) I would prefer to raise them "downtown," although I can't comment on specific American cities with their conspicuous crime.

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Went to junior high and high school in Florida--small town of 3000 with a lot of retirees and part-time residents..interesting experience.

I'll bet.

I'm all for "second-tier" metropolitan areas.

As much as I enjoyed growing up in L.A., I think that chapter is closed. New York is waaaayyyy too much. And I don't like Chicago's geographic position and weather. And San Francisco is waaaayyyy too expensive.

Ok, so where does the second tier begin? Probably 2 to 3 million and on down to about 1 million in the metro area. This would include Atlanta (which I loved), Seattle (too Nordic and uptight) and Portland (too close to Eugene, OR and too filled with hate for California transplants).

I have to live in a metro area because I require more mental stimulus than what a small town can bring. Plus, I like the whole multi-ethnic patchwork that one can't find in a small town.

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I'll bet.

I'm all for "second-tier" metropolitan areas.

As much as I enjoyed growing up in L.A., I think that chapter is closed. New York is waaaayyyy too much. And I don't like Chicago's geographic position and weather. And San Francisco is waaaayyyy too expensive.

Ok, so where does the second tier begin? Probably 2 to 3 million and on down to about 1 million in the metro area. This would include Atlanta (which I loved), Seattle (too Nordic and uptight) and Portland (too close to Eugene, OR and too filled with hate for California transplants).

I have to live in a metro area because I require more mental stimulus than what a small town can bring. Plus, I like the whole multi-ethnic patchwork that one can't find in a small town.

That's why I like Denver...there are about 2.8 mil in the metro area, it's big enough to have an excellent airport, light rail, diverse population and loads of dining options, major sports teams, etc, but not overwhelmingly big...after 5 years, I feel like I really know the city and the metro area. The only real downside for me is no ocean..I've got the mountains nearby, though..

Phoenix is about 3.5 mil, I like it also, but mostly because I have family there more than the weather..it's still a growing place, but the tech industry economy seems less strong than Denver, and the pay rates tend to be lower.. the desert is pretty interesting also.

I've been to Sacramento once, I've heard it's pretty nice...my sister works there and commutes from Phoenix every week and likes it..

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I've been to Sacramento once, I've heard it's pretty nice...my sister works there and commutes from Phoenix every week and likes it..

Grrrrrrr.....

I tell everybody "Draw the line at Sunrise Boulevard which runs for at least 10 miles in a N-S direction and clips I-80 to the north and US 50 to the south." Anything west of there is hideous, including most of the city, because it's flat and bleak. To the east of Sunrise Blvd., the terrain starts to undulate and, in about 15 miles, there are some interesting hills and ravines in the foothill communities. In fact, real estate in Folsom, Fair Oaks, Roseville, Rocklin, El Dorado Hills, and Auburn is generally of newer stock and more expensive.

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Grrrrrrr.....

I tell everybody "Draw the line at Sunrise Boulevard which runs for at least 10 miles in a N-S direction and clips I-80 to the north and US 50 to the south." Anything west of there is hideous, including most of the city, because it's flat and bleak. To the east of Sunrise Blvd., the terrain starts to undulate and, in about 15 miles, there are some interesting hills and ravines in the foothill communities. In fact, real estate in Folsom, Fair Oaks, Roseville, Rocklin, El Dorado Hills, and Auburn is generally of newer stock and more expensive.

Heh-heh... I'll admit, I've only really been to the airport, Arco Arena, and downtown... I went in an old Tower Records somewhere (this was in 2003, before they shut down), went to a Thai place near the Capitol that was very good, saw some GM EV-1s in a parking garage, etc. In 2005 I drove from San Jose to Denver (I-80) and remember it being very flat west of Sac along I-80).

My sister started a 3yr consulting gig on a massive state government project somewhere in Sac a few months... not sure where her corporate apt. or the client site is... I'm planning to go out some weekend this summer and head up to Yosemite for some sightseeing...

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I have to live in a metro area because I require more mental stimulus than what a small town can bring. Plus, I like the whole multi-ethnic patchwork that one can't find in a small town.

I love Minneapolis/St. Paul for that fact. I lived down there for part of the summer between my Junior and Senior years of high school. I lived with my cousin very close to the UofM and downtown Minneapolis. Something to do ALL the time, you are never bored, and much more cultural diversity than you get up here in North Dakota believe it or not. If I ever decided I wasn't going to farm, I would move down there in a second.

In the end though, I am a small town boy. I know that is where I will end up someday, no matter where life takes me. I know that is where I want to raise my kids someday.

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I love Minneapolis/St. Paul for that fact. I lived down there for part of the summer between my Junior and Senior years of high school. I lived with my cousin very close to the UofM and downtown Minneapolis. Something to do ALL the time, you are never bored, and much more cultural diversity than you get up here in North Dakota believe it or not. If I ever decided I wasn't going to farm, I would move down there in a second.

In the end though, I am a small town boy. I know that is where I will end up someday, no matter where life takes me. I know that is where I want to raise my kids someday.

It's good to know where your from and where your headed. I hate big cities, I have lived in some of the biggest, New York, Detroit, Washington DC, Rome, Bonn, Quito, Mexico City, Houston, Dallas. I like suburbia, it's where I am now and I don't think I will trade my malls for the big cities or the country life any time soon. I like gated communities, nice houses and great lawns. I guess I'm kinda boring in that regard, but it's what I like.

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I'm all for "second-tier" metropolitan areas.

...

Ok, so where does the second tier begin? Probably 2 to 3 million and on down to about 1 million in the metro area. This would include Atlanta (which I loved), Seattle (too Nordic and uptight) and Portland (too close to Eugene, OR and too filled with hate for California transplants).

Hmmm...wonder if Nashville TN fills this bill, too?

Funny thing is ... I've lived near Chicago nearly all of my life ... and HATE driving in that traffic ... and hate trying to navigate around the city.

Yet, I get to TN, Nashville area in particular, and have no problem with the traffic OR navigating.....

Cort:33swm."Mr Monte Carlo.Mr Road Trip".pig valve.pacemaker

PICS:lego.HO.model.MCinfo.RT.CHD = http://www.chevyasylum.com/cort

"It's kinda like Nashville, with a tan" ... Shawn Mullins ... 'Rockabye'

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In my little town

I grew up believ--ing

God keeps his eye on us all

And he used to lean upon me

As I pledged allegiance to the wall

Lord I recall

My little town

Coming home after school

Flying my bike past the gates

Of the factories

My mom doing the laundry

Hanging our shirts

In the dirty breeze

And after it rains

Theres a rainbow

And all of the colors are black

Its not that the colors arent there

Its just imagin-ation they lack

Everythings the same

Back in my little town

Nothing but the dead and dying

Back in my little town

Nothing but the dead and dying

Back in my little town

In my little town

I never meant nothin

I was just my fathers son

Saving my money

Dreaming of glory

Twitching like a finger

On the trigger of a gun

Leaving nothing but the dead and dying

Back in my little town

Repeat and fade:

Nothing but the dead and dying

Back in my little town

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I like gated communities, nice houses and great lawns.

Do you have any ascots in your armoire? :AH-HA_wink:

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I'll bet.

I'm all for "second-tier" metropolitan areas.

As much as I enjoyed growing up in L.A., I think that chapter is closed. New York is waaaayyyy too much. And I don't like Chicago's geographic position and weather. And San Francisco is waaaayyyy too expensive.

Ok, so where does the second tier begin? Probably 2 to 3 million and on down to about 1 million in the metro area. This would include Atlanta (which I loved), Seattle (too Nordic and uptight) and Portland (too close to Eugene, OR and too filled with hate for California transplants).

I have to live in a metro area because I require more mental stimulus than what a small town can bring. Plus, I like the whole multi-ethnic patchwork that one can't find in a small town.

BOISE is so YOU.!

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Do you have any ascots in your armoire? :AH-HA_wink:

No, I'm a German not a Brit, and we don't use words like armoire! :AH-HA_wink:

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BOISE is so YOU!

Yeah, right -- Mormons don't like Catholics, in case you didn't know. :AH-HA_wink:
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what do you call a Mormon gynecologist? A box elder.

Sorry, heard it this morning and though it was funny. :duck:

WMJ, WMJ....

What if a Southeast Asian gynecologist was named Dr. Poon? Wouldn't that be a hoot?

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I wouldnt say that Little towns have less ordinances, ive looked at my towns municipal codes and ordinances and they have just as many (far as i can tell) ordiances in our town of a 1000. Our ordinance enforcer (and parking meters) we call the "Meter Nazi" told me when i was asking about the rabbit and chicken ordinance said that most towns and cities adopt codes and regulations from already established cities.

Edited by Charger4U
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Our ordinance enforcer (and parking meters) we call the "Meter Nazi" told me when i was asking about the rabbit and chicken ordinance said that most towns and cities adopt codes and regulations from already established cities.

Chargerino:

Are you "well known" in the town there...maybe as being just a little bit assertive for your age? LOL. You know I'm just kidding you, right?

It doesn't sound like you miss Las Vegas very much at all!

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I grew up in the small town Zhawk & I currently live in. WHen we moved in we were not welcomed. This small town everyone was related to everyone else.

Back then you could ride your horses down main street with out a problem & Children were allowed to go anywhere & everywhere with out thought of them being hurt by someone.

Now adays you keep your kids close to home & you get a ticket for riding your horses down the main street unless its for the parade.

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Chargerino:

Are you "well known" in the town there...maybe as being just a little bit assertive for your age? LOL. You know I'm just kidding you, right?

It doesn't sound like you miss Las Vegas very much at all!

:lol: no i do not miss nevada at all although in las vegas when i would get in trouble in school the whole state didnt know. gotta miss that.

Edited by Charger4U
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WHen we moved in we were not welcomed.

Gee, it's Washington state, so why am I not surprised!

I lived on the eastside of Seattle for a little over 3 years -- In Bellevue and Kirkland. Beautiful communities to be sure.

However, the transplants hung out with the transplants and the natives hung out with the natives. I take it back: I had one "native Seattle" friend but he was Greek and had this fascination with going over to Greece to rummage around the same way I have the same fascination with Italy. And, it wasn't much of a friendship, because when I left to come south to my native California, the friendship ended and other friends I've had in other places remain friends despite the distance. I guess those are the real friends.

Other than that, that's the way it was up there IMO. And, prior to that, I lived in the Portland OR area....and guess what, it was the same way.

As pretty as it was, I don't think I would return to the Northwest (even though my parents chose to make that their home)....once bitten, twice shy.

Edited by trinacriabob
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Gee, it's Washington state, so why am I not surprised!

I lived on the eastside of Seattle for a little over 3 years -- Bin ellevue and Kirkland. Beautiful communities to be sure.

However, the transplants hung out with the transplants and the natives hung out with the natives. I take it back: I had one "native Seattle" friend but he was Greek and had this fascination with going over to Greece to rummage around the same way I have the same fascination with Italy. And, it wasn't much of a friendship, because when I left to come south to my native California, the friendship ended and other friends I've had in other places remain friends despite the distance. I guess those are the real friends.

Other than that, that's the way it was up there IMO. And, prior to that, I lived in the Portland OR area....and guess what, it was the same way.

As pretty as it was, I don't think I would return to the Northwest (even though my parents' chose to make that their home)....once bitten, twice shy.

Well it doesnt matter anymore back in 1980 when My family moved in to town there wasnt very many Military families living in Yelm. Now there are many of us living here & they dont care.

I am finding the people I grew up with really liked me they just werent sure how to come up to me.

I am still a person who speaks her mind & dont care who thinks bad about me

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