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2007 Duesenberg Torpedo Coupe

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Duesenberg Torpedo® Coupe

A new Duesenberg luxury automobile to bring the United States back into the top segment of the World automotive marketplace - the Duesenberg Torpedo® Coupe. It is now being designed by famed California automobile designer Jeff Teague, of Teague Design Inc. (teaguedesigninc@earthlink.net), with a planned market introduction in January, 2007. The Duesenberg Torpedo® Coupe will offer the ultimate luxury motoring for four passengers, along with a unique blend of automotive innovation and the finest comfort features.

The Torpedo® Coupe will be driven by a revolutionary new power plant, the CEM engine now in final development by E.P. Industries (eddiepaul@epindustries.com), an air-cooled and self lubricating, forced-air inducted (supercharged), 12 cylinder, double ended, ported, multi-fueled, four-stroke engine with a calculated 70 MPG and 300 horsepower from an economical 100 pound package measuring 18 inches in diameter and 24 inches in length, which will provide an unparalleled power-to-weight ratio.

Be sure to check back for updates on the progress on America's newest luxury automobile, updates will be posted frequently.

Currently in development with planned market introduction January 2007.

Duesenberg website
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The pictures make it look huge.....and maybe it's not........but 300 HP will not:

bring the United States back into the top segment of the World automotive marketplace


Yeah, 70 mpg and 300 HP is awesome.....but maybe they should put it in something a little smaller that could really benefit from the 300 HP.
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Air Cooled?--Will it pass emitions?----Duble Ended??--WHAT???----300HP??-((V12???))-And (SUPERCHARGED) at that??? It must be like 3.0L's or something! The idea of a new AMERICAN MADE DUESENDERG sounds ((GREAT!!)) But 300HP from a V12 with 70MPG?? Does not add up.
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Double ended may mean its reversable like a Detroit diesel was. Everything could be bolted to either end of the block, Im not sure why this would be needed, if it is what double ended means ? What baffels me is 18X24 @ 100 lbs. Thats small and light but much casting can be saved by eliminating water jacket. Id be concerned about reliability. It cant even be 3 litre I dont believe. Deutz diesel was a widely used air cooled diesel of decent reputation. At 100 lbs it doesnt sound like the crank or other necessary iron parts are strong enough. Well I hope they pull it off not pull it over.
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NICE!!! Maybe GM should buy this company, at least for the technology. Of course... Having a dream and achieving it are 2 different things. Examples: Tucker, revolutionary cars that never made it to mass market. Packard, recently (2000 time frame) Packard tried to make a comeback and, as far as I know was unsuccessful. They even used GM parts. Then comes Cunningham, Lutz baby, awesome credetials, big time backing and a complete flop, never came to market. Hopefully they can make it though... Didn't Morgan make a comeback from the dead? P.S. That Maybach concept is an AMAZING car!!! I love it!
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I am not liking the sketches of this proposal at all.

Eddie Paul must be a differet guy than the one who engineers/build so many Hollywood movie & TV cars, like the General Lee & the Merc from Cobra.

And I agree- there is something greatly amiss about the engine's specs...
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I am hopeing there are some MISPRINTS when refering to the Engine. I like the look of the rendering over all I just hope it works and works well. I would LOVE to see DUSI make a GREAT COME BACK with ADVANCED WORLD BEATING PREMIUM LEVEL PRODUCTS!!
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NICE!!!

Maybe GM should buy this company, at least for the technology.

Of course... Having a dream and achieving it are 2 different things.

Examples: Tucker, revolutionary cars that never made it to mass market. Packard, recently (2000 time frame) Packard tried to make a comeback and, as far as I know was unsuccessful. They even used GM parts. Then comes Cunningham, Lutz baby, awesome credetials, big time backing and a complete flop, never came to market.

Hopefully they can make it though... Didn't Morgan make a comeback from the dead?

P.S. That Maybach concept is an AMAZING car!!! I love it!

[post="43524"]<{POST_SNAPBACK}>[/post]



Morgan never died, they just withdrew from the American market. This Duesenberg is the latest iteration. The previous Duesenberg Motors company folded and the assets were acquired by this new company, Duesenberg Coachworks. The Murphy Roadster is carryover, the Estate Car is much improved. The licensor, Duesenberg LLC, remains unchanged. If GM were to build a Maybach and Rolls-Royce competitor (and the feeling is there is not a big enough market), then licencing the Duesenberg name would work well.
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Sounds like a smoke-and-mirrors thing...700mpg and 300 hp...riiiiight..
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I see now its got something to do with the cam halfs. It is a 12 piston engine and I understand what double ended means now. Very very interesting indeed !
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I see now its got something to do with the cam halfs. It is a 12 piston engine and I understand what double ended means now.

Very very interesting indeed !

[post="43600"]<{POST_SNAPBACK}>[/post]


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Morgan never died, they just withdrew from the American market. This Duesenberg is the latest iteration. The previous Duesenberg Motors company folded and the assets were acquired by this new company, Duesenberg Coachworks. The Murphy Roadster is carryover, the Estate Car is much improved. The licensor, Duesenberg LLC, remains unchanged. If GM were to build a Maybach and Rolls-Royce competitor (and the feeling is there is not a big enough market), then licencing the Duesenberg name would work well.


Actually, Morgan never withdrew from the American market either. Before the recent introduction of the Aero 8, there were two American distributors of the old Morgan designs; one in Virginia and one in San Francisco.

The old Duesenberg Motors built what I am told were excellent recreations of old Duesenberg designs. I have seen a couple in person and they're interest...they look like real Dueseys from a distance, but up-close, you can see the "PRNDL" gear shift lever and modern equipment like stereo systems and air conditioning. As I recall, they're based on Ford F-Series chassis, which makes sense for their size.

This "new" Duesenberg won't make it to production. There's no way that this comany could get a new design and an all-new engine certified for sale in the US. And what point is there on having an American-built luxury car if you can't sell it in the US?

There have been quite a few attempts at reviving old brands: Duesenberg (three other times), Packard (no fewer than two times), Tucker (Preston himself was working on it at the time of his death), among others. None have succeeded. I'm still amazed that Panoz is in production.

This is a very tough market to get into. I've seen financial statements that lead me to believe that it would take somewhere north of $50 million to launch an all-new vehicle with a dedicated engine and platform. I just don't see many people viewing this as a "niche waiting to be filled." As sad as that may be.

I have a list of more than 40 companies that have attempted to begin car production in the last quarter century, but between them all, may have built 200 vehicles including prototypes. It's a tough market.
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Technically even Russian SUV-maker UAZ has a US distributor, but that doesn't mean they have any real presence in the US market, nor that their vehicles are designed for US regulations. There any number of low-volume imports that don't have formal factory support in the same way a US-compliant Lotus or Morgan does.
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[post="43818"]<{POST_SNAPBACK}>[/post]


Ya know I still dont completely get it. What makes the pistons stroke, I know its got to do with the cam halfs but I dont see them in the working clip.

then how did they turn this pump into an engine ?

Maybe the cam halfs ride on the pins ?
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I see now, this is pretty swift. Now they need to utilize the ore tecnology used in professional chainsaws and that inner body can be made of light alloy with the cylinders coated for wear resistance. Which may very well be what they are doing. Now we have the heads to seal, thats gotta be the problem area. Rotary seals with chambers to isolate, hmm? I like this guy !
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Each end of a piston is effectively a seperate cylinder (2x6=12 cyl). While one side is expanding the other is compressed etc.. The stroke is caused by a normal combution process. The pins ride in a channel between the cam halves, converting the linear motion of the pistons into a radial motion about the driveshaft axis.
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Actually, Morgan never withdrew from the American market either. Before the recent introduction of the Aero 8, there were two American distributors of the old Morgan designs; one in Virginia and one in San Francisco.

The old Duesenberg Motors built what I am told were excellent recreations of old Duesenberg designs. I have seen a couple in person and they're interest...they look like real Dueseys from a distance, but up-close, you can see the "PRNDL" gear shift lever and modern equipment like stereo systems and air conditioning. As I recall, they're based on Ford F-Series chassis, which makes sense for their size.

This "new" Duesenberg won't make it to production. There's no way that this comany could get a new design and an all-new engine certified for sale in the US. And what point is there on having an American-built luxury car if you can't sell it in the US?

There have been quite a few attempts at reviving old brands: Duesenberg (three other times), Packard (no fewer than two times), Tucker (Preston himself was working on it at the time of his death), among others. None have succeeded. I'm still amazed that Panoz is in production.

This is a very tough market to get into. I've seen financial statements that lead me to believe that it would take somewhere north of $50 million to launch an all-new vehicle with a dedicated engine and platform. I just don't see many people viewing this as a "niche waiting to be filled." As sad as that may be.

I have a list of more than 40 companies that have attempted to begin car production in the last quarter century, but between them all, may have built 200 vehicles including prototypes. It's a tough market.

[post="43861"]<{POST_SNAPBACK}>[/post]


I find this very interesting.. Any idea where I could find more info on the topic?

BTW, I guess Saleen is an exception to the rule? I mean, I guess the S7 has to be certified doesn't it? Well, unless it's low volume enough not to be.
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