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Vehicle : 1940 Ford C.O.E.


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Thanks a lot, Escoda!!  :angry:

 

I pulled up my 'other computer' money spent list for this truck. What I used to do is 'apply' side profits to this truck to 'defray costs'… such as I sold the shell of a Nova convertible for $1000. So the bottom line number was artificially low.

 

AFTER stripping out all that sort of 'feel-good' accounting, my spread sheet on this truck is already at 4750… and I know it will clear 5000 just in adding in the receipts from 2014-2015. I also paid 1750 for it initially, not 1250.

 

Not mad, it's good to know these things & keep track. And I still shouldn't complain- that's still cheap for a running antique.  :D

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Yesterday I installed the passenger rear bearings, fully & freshly greased, the brake drum & the axle shaft. After fiddling with the shoe adjustments, it seems to spin fine. The shoes probably need to just get reacquainted with the drums MOVING past them again.

 

Scrubbed 2 rear tires up.

 

Also attempted to loosen the front bumper brackets & level the bumper. Had some success, but still not quite perfect. Then I promptly undid the bumper… well; 2 of the 3 bolts- the 3rd is too heavily rusted & I'm going to have to cut it off. Will use galvanized carriage bolts, unfortunately new… unless I decide to run it sans bumper. Hmmm...

 

Also, poking around on my 'COE shelves' revealed a straight inner crossmember (that the grille latches to) and a 'chin' piece that hangs from it and continues the sheet metal lines from the grille. I'd have to cut & weld the crossmember in… but I likely will since the one on the truck is badly tweaked & rattled around, making latching the grille improbable at best. 

 

Imagine my joy if I run over my own $800 grille on my maiden voyage. :(

 

Ordered a 1960s wiring 'how-to' book, which should be the perfect speed for this truck… as sniffing around for wiring advice has not been helpful as far as boosting confidence. You'd think converting tail lights to integral blinkers info would be easily found online… but apparently not.

Edited by balthazar
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Went to Fastenal, HD truck repair shop, 98-yr old hardware store & big lumber yard, apparently 9/16-in carriage bolts are no longer readily available. 2 of the 3 from the front bumper are usable, the 3rd is not. Going to try another decades-old hardware store tomm, and check online tonight. I'm kind of surprised I don't have any in my hardware collection, but I do not. This is just like the brake line fittings I was looking for last fall… fun with 75 yr old vehicles!

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Tried a total of 3 old time hardware stores hoping for some old stock… but I knew things were bad when the aforementioned 98-yr old store didn't have them (they are really good). 9/16-in carriage bolts are OUT of production- they jump from 1/2-in (usually the largest anyone carries) to the rare 5/8-in.

 

One store owner today told me "…if they even ever made them." I'll be hurrying back over there to be called 'stoopid' real soon. 

 

I have a line on some used bolts from another old Ford trucker online...

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I am absolutely LOVING every bit of this! Makes me want to go out and wrench on my F-100, for which I'm taking the same approach: get it roadworthy and reliable. 

Edited by Thed
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I am absolutely LOVING every bit of this! Makes me want to go out and wrench on my F-100, for which I'm taking the same approach: get it roadworthy and reliable. 

 

Do it man. Life is too short to think too much. This and another one from Camino (It's just a wire or something like that) have been good threads about vehicle projects.

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Got the differential cover & gasket back on, tightened down the rear brakes lines, and pumped 13 pints of gear oil in. There's still some minor amount of rust bits inside, but thankfully there's a drain plug at the bottom- I can run it some then change out the fluid- let it self clean.

 

I think all I have brake-wise is to connect/tighten up the front lines, install the master cylinder and get bleedin'.

 

Stopped at a small old-time junkyard I've passed numerous times before. I know they have some early '50s trucks because I'd previously been in from the backside. ;) He's going to check his bolt selection and supposedly call me. Still waiting on an online connection to see what he has.

 

April and into May was mad busy, hopefully I can get back on the COE regularly now.

Edited by balthazar
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Hope the junkyard can come up with something for you ...or your online connection ... or both!

 

Will be nice to see progress on this!

 

 

Cort :) www.oldcarsstronghearts.com

1979 & 1989 Caprice Classics | pigValve, paceMaker, cowValve
"Windows open on the rest of the world" __ Suzy Bogguss __ 'Drive South'
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  • 1 month later...

Month of June & July sucked for working on the truck (too much work!), this week looks light from here tho.

 

Junkyard guy said 'no' to bolt request. So I bought 3 galvanized 1/2-in bolts & nuts… by measuring both the new & original bolt shoulders, they are only about 1/32nd apart, so they won't turn in the bumper holes. I do want to get the bumper brackets loose/off so I can align the bumper- it was mad crooked. 

 

Took the last rear drum, knocked the last bearing out & cleaned it up… right before my parts washer goose neck broke off the (plastic} motor. I can fix it… but at least I got the last usage out of it I'll need for the truck. I hope. Outer bearing has one really rough roller, but I'm going to use it anyway. Races are excellent. Cleaned the retaining ring & grease seal also.

 

Drum brake surface is not as awesome as the other side's. Lot of rust on the surface with only maybe 20% of machined surface left. However, I worked at it with a razor blade, sandpaper and a Scotch Brite pad and I CAN get the surface completely smooth under the scientific 'closed eyes/ fingertip drag' method. I believe I can get the whole drum into smooth, useable shape. There's plenty of iron on the liner but I'd rather try this first.

 

I need to get the rear brake buttoned back up before I forget how. ;) Then wash the rear tires and install them, and the rolling stock is done.

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  • 2 months later...

Trying to get back into this project.

Got a buddy of mine being point man on the electrical segment, which is a great help. Today we disassembled the taillights/bracketry and the 3rd stoplight, cleaned all the grounding surfaces, smeared a pinch of dielectric grease on them and buttoned them all back up. Ran continuity tests, fixed one grounding situation in one tail, and got both tail's running & brake lights, plus the 3rd brake light operational (off 6V lantern battery). Felt pretty good to see a flicker of 'life' from the beast.

 

STOP_zpsa7y3oatt.jpg

 

Rest of the wiring is a hot mess, good thing there's just not much to it.

Edited by balthazar
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I'm still leaving my buddy as the lead on the electrical walnut. We talk every day or 2, I've been throwing him some monkey wrenches because I'd like to have turn signals. Truck has an aftermarket turn signal unit… but research so far seems to point to needing dedicated tail lights for turn signals, and I don't want to put 4 lights (plus the 3rd stop) hanging off the rear. I can tell he's getting stressed. ;)

May have to shop for a different signal unit. What puzzling about this one (a 'Signal Stat 700') is that it's marked "front" and "rear", NOT 'left' and 'right'. Still puzzling on that one. 
Here's a pic of a NICE one, mine looks like it's every day of 50 yrs old. 

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  • 1 month later...

My buddy has been an amazing help on the truck. He's thrown himself completely into the process of learning automotive electrics. We have a semi-generic, Ford-created wiring schematic, and he's been tracing wires, identifying circuits & continuity testing everything. He works on it at least 3 days a week now. Taillights are temporarily wired & work. Headlight assembles have both been removed to get the original wiring out of them. Headlights & their sockets all work. Gauges are out, so is the fuse block. Lots of jury-rigging has occurred on this truck's (estimated) 35 years of active service, including questionable wiring 'splitting' and added toggle switches. 97% of the wiring has to be replaced as it's in terrible condition, but I happen to have 3 spools of 10 & 12 gauge stranded wire on hand.

 

I have much nicer replacement gauges that I'm going to use, and tomm I plan of fabricating a new fuse block… pics to come.

 

Meanwhile, here is the current state of wiring affairs :

 

DSC04481_zpsvlqpooea.jpg

 

DSC04485_zpseqhmwjg3.jpg

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Some great progress today. 

Took the headlights off- the buckets are on 'stalks' (see the pics in Post #86), which had integral parking lights. 1939 & prior, the parking lights were incorporated into the headlights, '40 is the first year for sealed beam headlights, so the PLs were installed on the stalks for '40. However, my PLs were in rough shape- one lens fell off on it's own and the underlying bucket looks like it'll never come off. After removing them from the fenders, one mounting bolt was MIA.

DSC04494_zpsf74k3ajq.jpg

 

 

According to my state's vehicular code, they have an equipment mandate for trucks built after (what sure sounds like a wildly random date of) July 2, 1954. As long as all existing lights are functional, I believe I'm in the clear. There's no mention of PLs for vehicles prior to '54. I have a pair of rough spare fenders and they had PL-less stalks- they're either '38s or '39s. Shot everything up with Kroil, took both sides apart and swapped out the stalks, eliminating the PLs up front. The stalks are black, but they blend in fine

DSC04496_zps94o2anuq.jpg

 

 

Cleaned everything up, checked all the grounds, cut new rubber gaskets, ran new wires from the headlight sockets thru the dimmer switch and to the headlight switch- everything checks out continuity-wise! I've yet to buy a 6V battery, as 2 ganged 6V lantern batteries don't have enough juice to run 2 headlights, so we didn't test them. Tails, brake & headlight wiring is all done & checked now.

 

Also fabricated the new fuse block. Old one is the most sparsely-equipped fuse block I've ever seen. 2 fuses & a circuit breaker:

DSC04497_zpsugqrwyfr.jpg

 

DSC04495_zpsyiilj6ww.jpg

Edited by balthazar
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I was extremely lucky to score an NOS speedometer at a swap meet a few years ago (duh- the one on the right).

DSC04498_zpssjke9z93.jpg

 

The one on the left is what someone, at some point, installed. It's a period Ford passenger car unit. It interchanges physically, but it's incorrect (& quite optimistic). It's also rather deteriorated.

Note the correct HD truck unit's shift point recommendations.

 

 

The COE speedo & the gauge pod are side-lit by the newly-cleaned, checked & fully functional twin bulbs, transferred over from the pass car unit.

40%20dash%20light_zpsryg5wrie.jpg

 

Tiny signs of life.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Been working steady on the old girl. 

 

Wiring is about 95% replaced now. Compare pics in post# 96 with the below :

 

DSC04504_zpsdhgsptb6.jpg

 

DSC04503_zpsjjvsty8x.jpg

 

Still testing circuits but once all is done, will adjust lengths & wrap/tuck everything. So far, so good. Only area left is the motor/ignition electrics.
You can see my new fuse block with the hardware transferred over. 

Also looked at the horn & opened it up- all 'looks' good inside, uses a metal plate to vibrate rather than any sort of diaphragm. Have a tiny bit of cleanup at the steering column, run a wire and it'll be ready to test. Just about time to buy a new battery for the truck. :)

 

- - - - -

Also 'learned' the key system & tested it out. The column drop (holds the column to the dash) has a key and an 'ON/OFF' toggle. Ford addressed car theft in the '30s with a locking steering column.
To stop the truck you toggle to 'OFF', turn the steering wheel until it locks, then remove the key. To start, you insert key, rotate to unlock column, toggle 'ON' and press the starter button. As with a surprising quantity of things on this truck, all seems to be working well RE locking/unlocking. (And yea; big flipping deal RE the modern move to starter buttons. What's old is new again… ;) )

Edited by balthazar
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