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Vehicle : 1940 Ford C.O.E.


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Weather here in Jersey FINALLY broke, and hopefully for good. I believe it was in the low 60s, I was working outside in just a t-shirt (OK, I was ALSO wearing pants). ;)

 

Had cleared some of the off-season flotsam from around the COE yesterday, and tonight I finished cleaning the crud out of the driver's rear brake, pulled the shoes & cleaned/lubed everything & reinstalled the shoes. They have funky brass 'bearings' at the bottom anchor point, that allows the shoes to pivot there. Shoes have excellent material with no visible cracking or other deterioration.

 

Want to get the rear brakes done & back together. This is the Year of the Re-Roading; the '40 is 75 years old this year!! 

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Makin' lil' sketches…..

DSC03996_zpssrjiftqc.jpg

 

 

...makes for quick reassembly:

DSC03998_zpsrzo0eb2z.jpg

 

 

Driver's rear brake assembly all buttoned up:

DSC03997_zpsw9ajkaie.jpg

 

Also did some reassembly on the carb… tho I am missing a few screws after leaving it sit out for, umm, what feels like 6 months. Some of it is straightforward, but other bits are leaving me searching for a decent exploded view. For a tiny 2bb, it sure has a lot of gaskets. Luckily I have a spare complete carb I bought at an estate auction for $4. 

Edited by balthazar
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Grew up in my dads auto repair business, rebuilt plenty of Holly carbs and Isuzu carbs. Love the work, but just does not pay like working in the computer industry. :P

 

Now I am just about everything DI so never will probably touch them especially after I change out the top end of my Suburban so it can support DI for Petrol and CNG.

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Forgot to paint the MC cap- did that today. Busted down the rear pass brake & cleaned all the grime off everything. Put that wheel cylinder back on.
Cleaned the threads on the intake for the new shorter carb studs I had to buy; my truck came with a governor below the carb which I am not reinstalling. Also found some missing nuts & bolts for the carb I had misplaced. 

 

- - - - -

NEXT WEEK : Planning on taking the tires/rims, 2 at a time, to a 'country' tire store that is used to farm equipment, and had previously told me breaking down 20" Budd rims with retaining rings was no problem. I need to get new tubes but want to clean everything up on the rim & really check the tires out in & out, then I'll have them remount them. 

The tires are REALLY old. :scratchchin:

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Curious if anyone here has rebuilt a carburetor?

I myself have done a 1bbl, a couple 2bbls, a Carter AFB & Holly 4bbl.

Rebuilt a couple 2BBLs and a couple Quadrajets, and some small engine carbs, including several that really was too far gone.  I'm amazed how much one can do, as far as bushings and repairs go. 

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Finished the pass side rear brake hardware assembly today. want to do a final 'hose out' of the differential, then I will button that back up. 

 

Going to try and drop my tires off this week to get them broken down.

 

- - - - -

If 2 ply then I would replace them. Hate you to have a blow out on the road.

No- they are Atlas Plycron 7.00 x 20 10-ply 'Truck & Coach' tires.

 

If anyone is familiar with tire sidewall date codes, they follow a week/year format. For EX, '2711' would be the 27th week of 2011.

Mine, in that inset oval where modern date codes go, says '12108'. 

No. 1, there are but 52 weeks in a year. No. 2, I've owned the truck since '03, and I certainly didn't put tires on it.

Guess what I am looking at is something other than a date code.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Wow! Great thread, great project, great pictures.  Thanks for sharing.  I, too, think you will reach your goal!

 

"Want to get the rear brakes done & back together. This is the Year of the Re-Roading; the '40 is 75 years old this year!!

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Hot water/Dawn/HD scrub brush really cleaned up tire #1 this afternoon. If you look at the pic in post #1, they've always had this fine silt stain on just about all of them, plus they just looked dingy. I'm happy to see them clean up a bit. Physically they are in excellent shape including like no tread wear, PLUS they all match size/brand…. only detraction is fine 'dry rot' cracking. I've looked into 'care' for older tires & I have a procedure I'm going to try out. The 10-ply construction makes for a sidewall that feels like an inch thick (I will try and measure it) and none of the cracks are deep at all. Going to place my order for 2 new tubes and put those on the front, where what must be 90% of the weight. The bare chassis + bare frame rails out back + dually tires there would have almost no stress on them at all. All 6 hold air fine. Post-'procedure' pic to come...

 

Started wrapping my brain around the wiring situation- I've yet to wire a vehicle. This one has to be about the best possible volunteer to learn on; there are TWO fuses in the fuse block. Wiring is the last untapped frontier on this truck, all other systems are finished or mostly so. 

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Here's the 2 dismounted tires, one obviously cleaned and the other 'as-bought':

DSC04043_zpsqpntgxax.jpg

Started my aforementioned 'experiment' RE said tire… so far it's not going as well as I had hoped; waiting until morning to see if any difference is noted.

 

I will say this; even tho they are akin to Load Range E and 10-ply nylon carcasses, the dry rot is not necessarily…. reassuring.
Still unable to date these via the sidewalls OR vintage ads, but I suspect they are from the late 1960s.
I did order 2 new tubes today.

 

Also finished reassembly of my rebuilt carb, a Ford '91/94' 2-bbl :

DSC04045_zpskwugwxok.jpg

Won't have any idea if it's going to be cool about things, or randomly leak gas all over from numerous fissures… until I run it.

 

Also greased one inner bearing & set it & it's grease seal in one rear drum.  

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Well… after reading whatever I can find on old tires, it seems the vast majority of tire blow-outs happen with radials. The rubber is supposedly not as 'pure' & when they begin to dry rot, the steel belts rust & cut thru the tire. The sidewalls are not as strong since the reinforcement belts aren't in the sidewalls but only along the tread. I can see the criss-crossed reinforcement belts on the inside of my tires, from bead to bead.

 

If I didn't say this before, a few summers ago I cut a bad tire off a rim I wanted to keep, MANUALLY. Using a collection of cutters, saws, pry bars and a Sawz-All, it still took me about 1.5 hrs (IIRC) to get the tire cut all the way thru. I'll never tackle that job the same way again.

 

Either way, I believe the mitigating factors (weight around 4000 lbs on 10 ply tires, bias ply construction and low-speed local operation (45 MPH max) minimizes my risk. If I were closer to it's original weight as a tanker truck (16000 lbs) it would be a much higher demand on the tires, also if I were running at 60 MPH they would develop a lot more heat than they will @ 40. Going to give them a whirl.

Edited by balthazar
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If I didn't say this before, a few summers ago I cut a bad tire off a rim I wanted to keep, MANUALLY. Using a collection of cutters, saws, pry bars and a Sawz-All, it still took me about 1.5 hrs (IIRC) to get the tire cut all the way thru. I'll never tackle that job the same way again.

 

Either way, I believe the mitigating factors (weight around 4000 lbs on 10 ply tires, bias ply construction and low-speed local operation (45 MPH max) minimizes my risk. If I were closer to it's original weight as a tanker truck (16000 lbs) it would be a much higher demand on the tires, also if I were running at 60 MPH they would develop a lot more heat than they will @ 40. Going to give them a whirl.

1.5hrs... not bad.  I did the same thing back in 1994ish... probably 2.5~3 hrs beforeI gave up... I got through most of the tire, but couldn't cut the steel going through the bead with the tools I had.

I would try the tires and just keep an eye on them.  I had some 20 year old bias tires tires I used a for a short time once and they held up pretty good... with no tubes, even.  I probably don't even want to think about the bias tires on the big trailer right now... they are probably over 20 years old.

I thought using tubes in tires was illegal in NJ... or are these designed for that?

 

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In this era, it was all tubes. These rims in particular have retaining rings- I think it would be impossible to get one of these to seal without a tube.

Never heard of any law against tubes- certainly tube-intended tires are OK with them.

I'm also unaware of any retro-active laws that have superseded those in place the year the vehicle was produced. 

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Here's a snapshot from a 1949 Ford truck brochure:

 

48%20Ford%20F-6_zpsccqw4kmz.jpg

 

It has some interesting factoids. The difference between 'tractor' & 'truck' should be well known, and the gearing is the primary difference. "7.2" means a 7.20:1 axle, which is why the tractor is 'so much' slower at 46 MPH vs. the 5.83-geared truck at 53 MPH.

 

Whoo-hoo! I should be able to top 50 MPH!!

 

I've had a few discussions with my brother, who -as the owner of a tandem-axle Mack- sniffs at my truck as 'medium duty at best, but more like light duty'. Sure, compared to a Mack that can haul 18 tons payload, but 16000 lbs as a truck is pretty decent, IMO. As a tractor moving 28,000… that's no light duty truck.

 

- - - - - 

Got 5 junk tires demounted this week, might be 2 sellable rims in there but the rest are garbage.

DSC04047_zpsvyq5kbok.jpg

 

Monday I get the new tubes/flaps installed w/ the cleaned-up old tires on the cleaned-up rims. Reading up on wiring practices in the meantime…..

Edited by balthazar
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Tire outfit (which does a lot of HD truck & farm equipment) gave my 2 front tires a thumbs up. All mounted, new tubes, flaps, valves stems. Put them up front, where the bulk of the weight is. Hoping to button up the axle & rear drums this week. 

 

Also cut a chunk out of one of the junk tires. It was 'only' 8-ply, had dry rot cracking on the sidewall… but there's no way in hell you could blow them apart unless maybe they got really hot- those plys run bead-to-bead and the woven nylon belts are really hard to tear. I'm reassured.

 

New pic to pump (well, probably just me) up :

DSC04067_zpsfqrjulnz.jpg

Edited by balthazar
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What an awesome vehicle, seeing old cars like this always saddens me because in my country they are simply to expensive to buy even if they are rusty all the way through. 

 

Do you perhaps have an estimate on what you have spended so far and plan on spending in total? Always curious to see how much difference there is, especially since you are doing so much yourself which I admire. 

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How much spent? Hmm… I bought it for $1250 without a grille, which cost 800. Rebuilding the seats/upholstery cost 500. Beyond those costs, I would guess I only have about 400 more into it- I have a log on another computer but haven't kept it updated over the last 12 months I've been back to work on it… but I would estimate I only spent 150 in that 12 months. That's about $2950 total.

 

I would like to keep the overall number as low as possible. This is a 'get it running & drive it' project; the plan is preservation, not restoration. If I could get this driving relatively reliably for 3500, that would be pretty awesome. 

 

Escoda- where are you located?

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That sounds like a fairly good number! Of course it isn't cheap but nothing too expensive either, a car that old (and cool) driving for 3500 is a good deal. I also like the preservation part, too many people out there restoring old cars and not actually driving them for their pleasure.

 

I'm located in the Netherlands, any import car is overpriced and we don't have that many European old timers that I think are worth restoring to driving condition. For example if I'd want to buy a Mustang shell that needs an incredible amount of work I'd easily pay between 10.000 - 15.000, quite a chunk of money for a non driving car. 

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