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William Maley

VW News: Volkswagen Issues A Stop-Sale On TDI Models, CEO Apologizes

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In light of the announcement made by the EPA on Friday about certain Volkswagen vehicles equipped with the diesel engine violating emission standards, the German automaker has been at work on damage control. The Detroit News reported on Saturday that the company had pulled all of their ads and videos promoting the diesel engines on their YouTube page and asked dealers to put a stop-sale on Beetle, Jetta, and Passat models equipped with TDI engines. No word on how many vehicles are affected by this.

 

Yesterday, Volkswagen CEO Martin Winterkorn issued a statement apologizing for violating emission standards in the U.S. and said the company would launch an internal investigation.

 

The Board of Management at Volkswagen AG takes these findings very seriously. I personally am deeply sorry that we have broken the trust of our customers and the public. We will cooperate fully with the responsible agencies, with transparency and urgency, to
clearly, openly, and completely establish all of the facts of this case. Volkswagen has ordered an external investigation of this matter," said Winterkorn.

 

Source: The Detroit News, USA Today, Volkswagen

 

Press Release is on Page 2


 

STATEMENT OF PROF. DR. MARTIN WINTERKORN, CEO OF VOLKSWAGEN AG

 

Wolfsburg, September 20, 2015 – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the California Air Resources Board (EPA and CARB) revealed their findings that while testing diesel cars of the Volkswagen Group they have detected manipulations thatviolate American environmental standards.
The Board of Management at Volkswagen AG takes these findings very seriously. I personally am deeply sorry that we have broken the trust of our customers and the public. We will cooperate fully with the responsible agencies, with transparency and urgency, to
clearly, openly, and completely establish all of the facts of this case. Volkswagen has ordered an external investigation of this matter.

 

We do not and will not tolerate violations of any kind of our internal rules or of the law.
The trust of our customers and the public is and continues to be our most important asset. We at Volkswagen will do everything that must be done in order to re-establish the trust that so many people have placed in us, and we will do everything necessary in order to reverse the damage this has caused. This matter has first priority for me, personally, and for our entire Board of Management.


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Dear VW, You want to overcome your back room dealing Nazi past and lying to the public till now, then hire an INDEPENDENT 3rd party company to investigate and state what should be done. Then incorporate it and FIRE all involved in this play.

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Dear VW, You want to overcome your back room dealing Nazi past and lying to the public till now, then hire an INDEPENDENT 3rd party company to investigate and state what should be done. Then incorporate it and FIRE all involved in this play.

 

 

Uhhhhh...

 

 

 

Volkswagen has ordered an external investigation of this matter

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Dear VW, You want to overcome your back room dealing Nazi past and lying to the public till now, then hire an INDEPENDENT 3rd party company to investigate and state what should be done. Then incorporate it and FIRE all involved in this play.

 

 

Uhhhhh...

 

 

 

Volkswagen has ordered an external investigation of this matter

 

 

DOOOHHHHHH  :banghead:

 

Talk about totally missing the word External. I could have sworn when I read it, it was an internal investigation.

 

Glad to see external.  :thumbsup:  :gitfunky:

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Before y'all get excited, let's compare recent recalls:

 

VW: We lied.

 

GM: People died. 

 

#justsayin

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Before y'all get excited, let's compare recent recalls:

 

VW: We lied.

 

GM: People died. 

 

#justsayin

Don't jump the gun..

 

http://www.environmentalhealthnews.org/ehs/newscience/2013/11/diesel-lung-cancer-deaths/

 

"An estimated 6 percent of lung cancer deaths in the United States and the United Kingdom – 11,000 deaths per year – may be due to diesel exhaust, according to a new study.

Emission standards for diesel engines have become more stringent in recent years, but their exhaust still plays a significant role in lung cancer deaths among truckers, miners and railroad workers, the authors wrote. In addition, diesel exhaust still poses a major cancer threat for people living in dense cities or near highways, they said.

...

In addition, people in urban areas face a lifetime risk of lung cancer that is 10 times higher than the acceptable risk used in U.S. health standards, according to the study. An estimated 21 per 10,000 people exposed to the amount of diesel exhaust commonly found near U.S. highways would be at risk of dying of lung cancer over their lifetime. That compares to the risk of one death per 100,000 people that is used to set air-quality standards."        

Edited by ccap41
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This mess is going to be a big litmus test for the concept of government regulation of the automobile. This isn't a situation like with GM, where the media talking heads already have it in for them. This is VW, the darling of the hippie generation who went on to infest the chattering classes.

I suspect that within five years, VW will have weathered the storm. Either the old hippies will circle the busses, or the buying public will shrug their shoulders at the EPA's screaming.

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Looks like others will have to show their cards soon as well,

 

 

https://www.yahoo.com/autos/why-vw-might-not-be-the-only-automaker-with-a-129578004067.html

 

 

Think what you want, but if Diesel was so clean, why are automakers lying about it.

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Looks like others will have to show their cards soon as well,

 

 

https://www.yahoo.com/autos/why-vw-might-not-be-the-only-automaker-with-a-129578004067.html

 

Think what you want, but if Diesel was so clean, why are automakers lying about it.

The same reason some manufacturers got busted for lying about FE-their marketing folks wrote checks the engineers couldn't cash.

My truck uses urea. Still gets awesome FE. Urea usage is pretty modest too

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Looks like others will have to show their cards soon as well,

 

 

https://www.yahoo.com/autos/why-vw-might-not-be-the-only-automaker-with-a-129578004067.html

 

Think what you want, but if Diesel was so clean, why are automakers lying about it.

The same reason some manufacturers got busted for lying about FE-their marketing folks wrote checks the engineers couldn't cash.

My truck uses urea. Still gets awesome FE. Urea usage is pretty modest too

 

 

Sorry,

overshooting and then correcting mpg hybrid figures, based on the updated drive cycles of extreme variability like a hybrid.....is hardly the same thing as intentionally falsifying software to cover your lies, and the whole time you are spewing cancer causing emissions into the environment in HUGE numbers.

 

Ford has nothing to do with this news here.

Bring them up again and it's good for some downvotes.......and we all know how you lose it when you get downvotes.

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VW stock down 17% today.

Yep. I saw that earlier as well. I don't expect it to go up for awhile either. At least until official fine numbers and whatnot get released.

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Looks like others will have to show their cards soon as well,

 

 https://www.yahoo.com/autos/why-vw-might-not-be-the-only-automaker-with-a-129578004067.html

 

Think what you want, but if Diesel was so clean, why are automakers lying about it.

The same reason some manufacturers got busted for lying about FE-their marketing folks wrote checks the engineers couldn't cash.

My truck uses urea. Still gets awesome FE. Urea usage is pretty modest too

 

Sorry,

overshooting and then correcting mpg hybrid figures, based on the updated drive cycles of extreme variability like a hybrid.....is hardly the same thing as intentionally falsifying software to cover your lies, and the whole time you are spewing cancer causing emissions into the environment in HUGE numbers.

 

Ford has nothing to do with this news here.

Bring them up again and it's good for some downvotes.......and we all know how you lose it when you get downvotes.

I didn't mention Ford ONCE in that post.

Perhaps you've heard of Hyundai/Kia?

So, tell me... when do you get fitted for your tinfoil hat? :D :D :D

Turnips. Yeesh

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Looks like others will have to show their cards soon as well,

 

 

https://www.yahoo.com/autos/why-vw-might-not-be-the-only-automaker-with-a-129578004067.html

 

Think what you want, but if Diesel was so clean, why are automakers lying about it.

The same reason some manufacturers got busted for lying about FE-their marketing folks wrote checks the engineers couldn't cash.

My truck uses urea. Still gets awesome FE. Urea usage is pretty modest too

 

I don't think it was as much of a lie as it was their internal testing procedure was just wrong, for all of them that had to make adjustments. But that's just my opinion.

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If you're referring to VW, they're as guilty as sin. That software existed since, what, '09? I mean, this is a huge, and hugely deliberate, attempt to pull a fast one on the EPA. And mark my words, they will be hammered for it.

But they'll bounce back.

Edited by El Kabong
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Looks like others will have to show their cards soon as well,

 

 

https://www.yahoo.com/autos/why-vw-might-not-be-the-only-automaker-with-a-129578004067.html

 

Think what you want, but if Diesel was so clean, why are automakers lying about it.

The same reason some manufacturers got busted for lying about FE-their marketing folks wrote checks the engineers couldn't cash.

My truck uses urea. Still gets awesome FE. Urea usage is pretty modest too

 

I don't think it was as much of a lie as it was their internal testing procedure was just wrong, for all of them that had to make adjustments. But that's just my opinion.

 

 

No matter what we all think, Bloomberg is now saying that VW is stating this actually affects 11 million auto's they made. Their stock has dropped 25% in the last 2 days so a Market loss of 25 Billion Euros in value. VW estimates 6.8 Billion Euros to fix. The following countries have now stated they will investigate and possibly fine VW. Germany, France, South Korea and Italy on top of the US and Canada.

 

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-09-22/vw-to-set-aside-7-3-billion-as-diesel-emissions-scandal-widens

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Guest wings4life

 

 

Looks like others will have to show their cards soon as well,

 

 

https://www.yahoo.com/autos/why-vw-might-not-be-the-only-automaker-with-a-129578004067.html

 

Think what you want, but if Diesel was so clean, why are automakers lying about it.

The same reason some manufacturers got busted for lying about FE-their marketing folks wrote checks the engineers couldn't cash.

My truck uses urea. Still gets awesome FE. Urea usage is pretty modest too

 

I don't think it was as much of a lie as it was their internal testing procedure was just wrong, for all of them that had to make adjustments. But that's just my opinion.

 

Ford took liberties when they were establishing mpg ratings with several hybrids that shared the same exact powertrains, batteries, etc.  That much is clear. But it’s not the first time automakers do this kind of thing when you share so much on a vehicle.  It turned out that the much higher sensitivity in mpg based on varied use, combined with the taller C-Max profile, simply over-emphasized the delta, and Ford re-configured.  Plain and simple.  High mpg is most sensitive to aerodynamics than most other factors.  Weight is barely even a factor at 65mpg, and we know this because when we add several passengers, are mileage barely changes.  But throw a roof rack on your SUV, and your will suddenly see a 3-4mpg drop just from that, as I did with my Explorer many times.

 

And Ford was clearly the target here, in this VW thread, even though our crafty Anti-Fordite did not say the four letter word….and I doubt there is one person here that would deny that.

 

Back to VW.

 

Yeah, Ouch.

Criminal prosecution is next up they say.

 

 

Of course, as mentioned, that is nothing compared to over-reaching with mpg’s…..for ‘some brands.’

 

LOL

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Hey, I didn't make you look like a moron. That was all on you.

Sure was funny to watch you absolutely lose it tho :D :D :D

And since you brought it up... Ford was as underhanded as VW.

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Looks like others will have to show their cards soon as well,

 

 

https://www.yahoo.com/autos/why-vw-might-not-be-the-only-automaker-with-a-129578004067.html

 

Think what you want, but if Diesel was so clean, why are automakers lying about it.

The same reason some manufacturers got busted for lying about FE-their marketing folks wrote checks the engineers couldn't cash.

My truck uses urea. Still gets awesome FE. Urea usage is pretty modest too

 

I don't think it was as much of a lie as it was their internal testing procedure was just wrong, for all of them that had to make adjustments. But that's just my opinion.

 

Ford took liberties when they were establishing mpg ratings with several hybrids that shared the same exact powertrains, batteries, etc.  That much is clear. But it’s not the first time automakers do this kind of thing when you share so much on a vehicle.  It turned out that the much higher sensitivity in mpg based on varied use, combined with the taller C-Max profile, simply over-emphasized the delta, and Ford re-configured.  Plain and simple.  High mpg is most sensitive to aerodynamics than most other factors.  Weight is barely even a factor at 65mpg, and we know this because when we add several passengers, are mileage barely changes.  But throw a roof rack on your SUV, and your will suddenly see a 3-4mpg drop just from that, as I did with my Explorer many times.

 

And Ford was clearly the target here, in this VW thread, even though our crafty Anti-Fordite did not say the four letter word….and I doubt there is one person here that would deny that.

 

Back to VW.

 

Yeah, Ouch.

Criminal prosecution is next up they say.

 

 

Of course, as mentioned, that is nothing compared to over-reaching with mpg’s…..for ‘some brands.’

 

LOL

 

Absolutely aero plays a MAJOR factor in fuel mileage. Just take a glance at an instant mpg readout going with and against the wind to find that out.

 

I also didn't realize THAT was their error in measuring/testing the ratings on those cars and it is good to know. Thanks for the insight.

 

Aaaaaaaaand somebody is already gone.

 

http://jalopnik.com/vw-ceo-martin-wintekorn-being-replaced-by-matthias-muel-1732285443

Edited by ccap41

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:roflmao:

 

This was to good not to copy from the other discussion thread from jalopnik.

 

:roflmao:

 

post-12-0-29933800-1442951407_thumb.jpg

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    • By William Maley
      The three-row full-size crossover has taken the place of large SUVs as the vehicle of choice for growing families. Crossovers offer the tall ride height and large space, but not at the cost of fuel economy and ride quality. Recently, I spent a week in the 2018 Mazda CX-9 and Volkswagen Atlas. These two models could not be any different; one is focused on providing driving enjoyment, while the other is concerned about providing enough space for cargo and passengers. Trying to determine which one was the best would prove to be a difficult task.
      Exterior
      There is no contest between these two when it comes to design as the CX-9 blows the Atlas out of the water. The overall look balances aggressive and elegance traits. For the front, Mazda has angled the clip to give off a sporting profile while a large grille and a set of slim headlights accentuate this. Move around to the side and you’ll notice the CX-9 has quite a long front end and the rear roof pillars are angled slightly forward. These design cues help make the CX-9 look slightly smaller than it actually is.
      Someone once described a Volkswagen vehicle as “looking like a bit of a square, but a posh square.” That’s how I would sum up the Atlas’ design; it is basically a box on wheels. There are some nice touches such as the LED headlights that come standard on all models and chunky fenders. The 18-inch alloy wheels that come with the SE w/Technology look somewhat small on the Atlas, but that is likely due to the large size of the vehicle.
      Interior
      The Atlas’ interior very much follows the ideals of the exterior, which are uncomplicated and utilitarian. While it does fall flat when compared to the CX-9’s luxury design, Volkswagen nails the ergonomics. Most of the controls are within easy reach of driver and passenger. One touch that I really like is the climate control slightly angled upward. Not only does this make it easier to reach, but you can quickly glance down to see the current settings. There is only a small amount of soft-touch material used throughout the Atlas’ interior, the rest being made up of hard plastics. While that is slightly disappointing as other crossovers are adding more soft-touch materials, Volkswagen knows that kids are quite rough to vehicles.
      If there is one benefit to Volkswagen’s plain styling on the outside, it is the massive interior. I haven’t been in such a spacious three-row crossover since the last GM Lambda I drove. Beginning with the third-row, I found that my 5’9” frame actually fit with only my knees just touching the rear of the second-row. Moving the second row slightly forward allows for a little more legroom. Getting in and out of the third-row is very easy as the second-row tilts and moves forward, providing a wide space. This particular tester came with a second-row bench seat. A set of captain chairs are available as an option on SE and above. Sitting back here felt like I was in a limousine with abundant head and legroom. The seats slide and recline which allows passengers to find that right position. The only downside to both rear rows is there isn’t enough padding for long trips. For the front seat, the driver gets a ten-way power seat while the passenger makes do with only a power recline and manual adjustments. No complaints about comfort as the Atlas’ front seats had the right amount of padding and firmness for any trip length.
      The cargo area is quite huge. With all seats up, the Atlas offers 20.6 cubic feet of space. This increases to 55.5 cubic feet when the third-row is folded and 96.8 cubic feet with both rows folded. Only the new Chevrolet Traverse beats the Atlas with measurements of 23, 58.1, and 98.2 cubic feet.
      As a way to differentiate itself from other automakers, Mazda is trying to become more premium. This is clearly evident in the CX-9’s interior. The dash is beautiful with contouring used throughout, and a mixture of brushed aluminum and soft-touch plastics with a grain texture. If I were to cover up the Mazda badge on the steering wheel and ask you to identify the brand, you might think it was from a German automaker. Ergonomics aren’t quite as good as the Atlas as you have to reach for certain controls like those for the climate system.
      The CX-9’s front seats don’t feel quite as spacious when compared to the Atlas with a narrow cockpit and the rakish exterior are to blame. Still, most drivers should be able to find a position that works. The seats themselves have a sporting edge with increased side bolstering and firm cushions. I found the seats to be quite comfortable and didn’t have issues of not having enough support. Moving to the second row, Mazda only offers a bench seat configuration. This is disappointing considering all of the CX-9’s competitors offer captain chairs as an option. There is more than enough legroom for most passengers, but those six-feet and above will find headroom to be a bit tight. Getting into the third-row is slightly tough. Like the Atlas, the CX-9’s second row slides and tilts to allow access. But space is noticeably smaller and does require some gymnastics to pass through. Once seated, I found it to be quite cramped with little head and legroom. This is best reserved for small kids.
      Cargo area is another weak point to the CX-9. With both back seats up, there is only 14.4 cubic feet. This puts it behind most of the competition aside from the GMC Acadia which has 12.8. It doesn’t get any better when the seats are folded. With the third-row down, the CX-9 has 38.2 cubic feet. Fold down the second-row and it expands to 71.2 cubic feet. To use the GMC Acadia again, it offers 41.7 cubic feet when the third-row is folded and rises to 79 with both rows. Keep in mind, the Acadia is about six inches shorter than the CX-9.
      Infotainment
      All CX-9’s come equipped with the Mazda Connect infotainment system. The base Sport comes with a 7-inch touchscreen, while the Touring and above use a larger 8-inch screen. A rotary knob and set of redundant buttons on the center console control the system. Using Mazda Connect is a bit of a mixed bag. The interface is beginning to look a bit dated with the use of dark colors and a dull screen. Trying to use the touchscreen is an exercise in frustration as it is not easy to tell which parts are touch-enabled and not. On the upside, moving around Mazda Connect is a breeze when using the knob and buttons. Currently, Mazda doesn’t offer Apple CarPlay or Android Auto compatibility. Thankfully, this is being remedied with the 2019 model as Touring models and above will come with both.
      For the Atlas, Volkswagen offers three different systems. A 6.5-inch touchscreen is standard on the S. Moving up to either the SE, SE w/Technology, or SEL nets you an 8-inch screen. The top line SEL Premium adds navigation to the 8-inch system. All of the systems feature Apple CarPlay and Android Auto compatibility. The current Volkswagen system is one of the easiest to use thanks in part to intuitive menu structure and quick responses. Moving through menus or presets is easy as the system reacts to the swiping gesture like you would do on your smartphone. There are a couple of downsides to the Volkswagen system. One is there is no haptic feedback when pressing the shortcut buttons on either side of the screen. Also, the glass surface becomes littered with fingerprints very quickly. 
      I did have an issue with the system when trying to use Apple CarPlay. At times, applications such as Spotify would freeze up. I could exit out to the CarPlay interface, but was unable to get the apps unfrozen until I shut the vehicle off. After resetting my iPhone, this problem went away. This leaves me wondering how much of this problem was with my phone and not the infotainment system.
      Powertrain
      Both of these crossovers are equipped with turbocharged four-cylinder engines. The CX-9 has a 2.5L producing either 227 or 250 (on premium fuel) horsepower and 310 pound-feet of torque. The Atlas has a 2.0L producing 235 horsepower and 258 pound-feet. An optional 3.6L V6 with 276 horsepower is available for the Atlas. For the Mazda, power is routed to a six-speed automatic and the choice of front or all-wheel drive. The Volkswagen makes do with an eight-speed automatic and front-wheel drive only. If you want AWD, you need the V6.
      Thanks to its higher torque figure, the CX-9 leaves the Atlas in the dust. There is barely any lag coming from the turbo-four. Instead, it delivers a linear throttle response and a steady stream of power.  NVH levels are noticeably quieter than the Atlas’ turbo-four. The six-speed automatic delivers seamless shifts and is quick to downshift when you need extra power such as merging.
      The turbo-four in the Atlas seems slightly overwhelmed at first. When leaving a stop, I found that there was a fair amount of turbo-lag. This is only exacerbated if the stop-start system is turned on. Once the turbo was spooling, the four-cylinder did a surprising job of moving the 4,222 pound Atlas with no issue. Stab the throttle and the engine comes into life, delivering a smooth and constant stream of power. The eight-speed automatic provided quick and smooth shifts, although it was sometimes hesitant to downshift when more power was called for.
      Fuel Economy
      Both of these models are close in fuel economy. EPA says the CX-9 AWD should return 20 City/26 Highway/23 Combined, while the Atlas 2.0T will get 22/26/24. During the week, the CX-9 returned 22.5 mpg in mostly city driving and the Atlas got 27.3 mpg with a 60/40 mix of highway and city driving. The eight-speed transmission in the Atlas makes a huge difference.
      Ride & Handling
      The CX-9 is clearly the driver’s choice. On a winding road, the crossover feels quite nimble thanks to a well-tuned suspension. There is a slight amount of body roll due to the tall ride height, but nothing that will sway your confidence. Steering has some heft when turning and feels quite responsive. Despite the firm suspension, the CX-9’s ride is supple enough to iron out most bumps. Only large imperfections and bumps would make their way inside. Barely any wind and road noise made it inside the cabin.
      The Atlas isn’t far behind in handling. Volkswagen’s suspension turning helps keep body roll in check and makes the crossover feel smaller than it actually is. The only weak point is the steering which feels somewhat light when turning. Ride quality is slightly better than the CX-9 as Atlas feels like riding on a magic carpet when driving on bumpy roads. Some of this can be attributed to smaller wheels. There is slightly more wind noise coming inside the cabin.
      Value
      It would be unfair to directly compare these two crossovers due to the large gap in price. Instead, I will be comparing them with the other’s similar trim.
      The 2018 Volkswagen Atlas SE with Technology begins at $35,690 for the 2.0T FWD. With destination, my test car came to $36,615, The Technology adds a lot of desirable features such as three-zone climate control, adaptive cruise control, automatic emergency braking, blind spot monitoring with rear-cross traffic alert, forward collision warning, and lane departure alert. The Mazda CX-9 Touring is slightly less expensive at $35,995 with destination and matches the Atlas on standard features, including all of the safety kit. But we’re giving the Atlas the slight edge as you do get more space for not that much more money.
      Over at the CX-9, the Grand Touring AWD begins at $42,270. With a couple of options including the Soul Red paint, the as-tested price came to $43,905. The comparable Atlas V6 SEL with 4Motion is only $30 more expensive when you factor in destination. Both come closely matched in terms of equipment with the only differences being the Grand Touring has navigation, while the SEL comes with a panoramic sunroof. This one is a draw as it will come down whether space or luxury is more important to you.
      Verdict
      Coming in second is the Mazda CX-9. It may have the sharpest exterior in the class, a premium interior that could embarrass some luxury cars, and pleasing driving characteristics. But ultimately, the CX-9 falls down on the key thing buyers want; space. It trails most everyone in passenger and cargo space. That is ultimately the price you pay for all of the positives listed. 
      For a first attempt, Volkswagen knocked it out of the park with the Atlas. It is a bit sluggish when leaving a stop and doesn’t have as luxurious of an interior as the CX-9. But Volkswagen gave the Atlas one of the largest interiors of the class, a chassis that balances a smooth ride with excellent body control, impressive fuel economy, and a price that won’t break the bank.
      Both of these crossovers are impressive and worthy of being at the top of the consideration list. But at the end of the day, the Atlas does the three-row crossover better than the CX-9.
      Disclaimer: Mazda and Volkswagen Provided the Vehicles, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2018
      Make: Mazda
      Model: CX-9
      Trim: Grand Touring AWD
      Engine: Turbocharged 2.5L Skyactiv-G Four-Cylinder
      Driveline: Six-Speed Automatic, All-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 227 @ 5,000 (Regular), 250 @ 5,000 (Premium)
      Torque @ RPM: 310 @ 2,000 rpm
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 20/26/23
      Curb Weight: 4,361 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Hiroshima, Japan
      Base Price: $42,470
      As Tested Price: $43,905 (Includes $940.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Soul Red Metallic - $595.00
      Cargo Mat - $100.00
      Year: 2018
      Make: Volkswagen
      Model: Atlas
      Trim: 2.0T SE w/Technology
      Engine: Turbocharged 2.0L DOHC 16-Valve TSI Four-Cylinder
      Driveline: Eight-Speed Automatic, Front-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 235 @ 4,500
      Torque @ RPM: 258 @ 1,600
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 22/26/24
      Curb Weight: 4,222 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Chattanooga, TN
      Base Price: $35,690
      As Tested Price: $36,615 (Includes $925.00 Destination Charge)
      Options: N/A
    • By William Maley
      It seems like ages since Mazda announced plans to bring over a diesel engine. Many things have transpired since then with various delays and the Volkswagen diesel emission scandal. While the company said the diesel engine was still in the cards, we started to think it was as real as bigfoot or the loch ness monster. But the engine is one step closer to reality as the EPA has posted the fuel economy figures for the CX-5 diesel.
      For the front-wheel variant, the CX-5 diesel will return 28 City/31 Highway/29 Combined. All-wheel drive see a slight drop to 27/30/28. Major improvement over gas model, right? Not really. The FWD gas model does trail the diesel in the city by three, but there is only a one mpg difference in the highway and the combined figure is the same. The AWD gas model is pretty much the same story; three mpg difference in the city, two mpg difference on the highway, and the same figure for combined.
      It gets even worse if we compare it to the Chevrolet Equinox and GMC Terrain Diesel. In FWD guise, EPA figures stand at 28 City/39 Highway/32 Combined. AWD models return 28/38/32.
      We're guessing that new emissions equipment and harder testing likely affected CX-5 diesel's fuel economy figure. Mazda might sell the diesel engine as a performance upgrade - the 2.2L turbodiesel produces 170 horsepower and 310 pound-feet of torque. 
      No timeframe has been given on when the CX-5 diesel will finally go on sale.
      Source: EPA

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      It seems like ages since Mazda announced plans to bring over a diesel engine. Many things have transpired since then with various delays and the Volkswagen diesel emission scandal. While the company said the diesel engine was still in the cards, we started to think it was as real as bigfoot or the loch ness monster. But the engine is one step closer to reality as the EPA has posted the fuel economy figures for the CX-5 diesel.
      For the front-wheel variant, the CX-5 diesel will return 28 City/31 Highway/29 Combined. All-wheel drive see a slight drop to 27/30/28. Major improvement over gas model, right? Not really. The FWD gas model does trail the diesel in the city by three, but there is only a one mpg difference in the highway and the combined figure is the same. The AWD gas model is pretty much the same story; three mpg difference in the city, two mpg difference on the highway, and the same figure for combined.
      It gets even worse if we compare it to the Chevrolet Equinox and GMC Terrain Diesel. In FWD guise, EPA figures stand at 28 City/39 Highway/32 Combined. AWD models return 28/38/32.
      We're guessing that new emissions equipment and harder testing likely affected CX-5 diesel's fuel economy figure. Mazda might sell the diesel engine as a performance upgrade - the 2.2L turbodiesel produces 170 horsepower and 310 pound-feet of torque. 
      No timeframe has been given on when the CX-5 diesel will finally go on sale.
      Source: EPA
    • By William Maley
      Under the current standards for vehicle emissions, automakers have a variety of ways to achieve compliance. These are known as "compliance flexibilities" which allows an automaker to sell electric vehicles to off-set gad-guzzlers like SUVs as an example. But the recent proposal by the Trump administration to ease emission standards, will remove these flexibilities.
      The proposal unveiled last week would freeze fuel-economy and emissions standards at their 2020 levels for several years beyond that. This would seem like a positive for automakers as trucks and SUVs/crossovers are selling like hotcakes. But the removal of this provision has automakers crying fowl, saying these help with global vehicle development. The heads of the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers and the Association of Global Automakers wrote a letter to Trump stating that the “flexible compliance pathways that pave the way for research and deployment in advanced fuel-saving technologies”.
      “We are global manufacturers; to compete around the world, we must continue to invest in both more efficient internal combustion engine technologies, electric-drive technologies and fuel cells,” said Mitch Bainwol of the Alliance, and John Bozzella of the Global Automakers.
      But there is a reason the government is removing those compliance flexibilities as it "existing fuel-economy program easier to administer and more transparent". This makes it easier for regulators and consumers to verify an automaker's claim. The current system is somewhat confusing, as thirstier automakers can buy into compliance by trading emission credits from more efficient ones. The trades and prices can be shielded from public viewing.
      Source: Bloomberg

      View full article
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