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New York Auto Show: 2017 Mitsubishi Mirage G4 & Outlander PHEV: Comments


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Mitsubishi seems to be in a pattern of unveiling two models for an auto show. At the LA Auto Show, the Japanese automaker introduced the updated 2017 Mirage and Outlander Sport. For New York, Mitsubishi introduced the 2017 Mirage G4 sedan and Outlander PHEV.

 

We'll begin with the Mirage G4 which takes the Mirage hatchback and adds a trunk. Personally, I think it looks somewhat nicer than the refreshed hatch. Power comes from a 1.2L three-cylinder with 78 horsepower and 74 pound-feet of torque. There is a choice of either a five-speed manual or CVT. Standard on the G4 will be Apple Carplay and Android Auto integration. The Mirage G4 goes on sale this spring.

 

Next is the Outlander PHEV. This model was originally supposed to go on sale back in 2014, but a number of delays have pushed the launch back to this fall. The hybrid system is composed of a 2.0L four-cylinder, an electric motor on each axle, and 12-kWh lithium-ion battery. There are three modes the hybrid system can be in based on driver demands,

  • EV Mode: Runs on electric power only
  • Series Hybrid: Engine acts as a generator for the batteries (think Chevrolet Volt)
  • Parallel Hybrid: Engine and electric motors work together


Mitsubishi hasn't revealed power figures or fuel economy figures for the Outlander PHEV.

 



Source: Mitsubishi

 

Press Release is on Page 2


 

MITSUBISHI UNVEILS ALL-NEW 2017 MIRAGE G4: A SPIRITED SEDAN WITH STYLE, VALUE, AGILITY AND CONNECTIVITY

  • Superior fuel economy and super-low Greenhouse Gas Emissions make the Mirage G4 one of the top environmentally conscious gas-powered sedans in the industry
  • Offers unexpected connectivity in a sub-compact car with Apple CarPlay support and Android Auto


Mitsubishi Motors North America, Inc. (MMNA) today unveiled the all-new 2017 Mitsubishi Mirage G4. A sibling to the well-established and popular Mirage hatchback, the all-new Mirage G4 brings consumers a fresh dose of clean style, environmental consciousness, agility, connectivity, affordability and value. The Mirage G4 goes on sale this spring at Mitsubishi showrooms across the country.

 


“A few years ago we entered the subcompact segment with the Mirage hatchback and its popularity with consumers has grown every year with its combination of top fuel economy, attractive pricing and one of the industry's best new car warranties. The new Mirage G4 repeats that value equation in a four-door sedan package,” said MMNA executive vice president, Don Swearingen. “The Mirage hatchback and now the Mirage G4 sedan will form a formidable one-two punch in the subcompact segment.”

 

The Mirage G4 will utilize the same powertrain of the 2017 hatchback, a revised 1.2-liter three-cylinder engine. The small displacement engine provides a harmonious blend of lively acceleration and efficiency. The Mirage G4 will be at the top of its class in combined fuel efficiency and C02 emissions. Inside, the Mirage G4's long wheelbase provides for a spacious interior cabin and trunk.

 

Adding an element of surprise and delight to the subcompact segment, the Mirage G4 will come equipped with available smartphone integrations, features typically reserved for higher priced vehicles. Support for Apple CarPlay™, the smarter, safer way to use your iPhone in the car, lets drivers make calls, get directions optimized for traffic conditions, listen to music, and access messages. Android Auto™ extends the Android™ platform into the car in a way that's purpose-built for driving.

 

Staying true to its value-driven roots, the Mirage G4 is supported by Mitsubishi's phenomenal warranties: fully transferable 5-year/60,000 mile new vehicle limited warranty; 10-year/100,000 mile powertrain limited warranty; 7-year/100,000 mile anti-corrosion perforation limited warranty and a 5-year/unlimited mile roadside assistance.

 


MITSUBISHI OUTLANDER PHEV MAKES U.S. DEBUT AT THE 2016 NEW YORK INTERNATIONAL AUTO SHOW

  • 2017 Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV to go on sale in United States in fall 2016
  • Already the top-selling PHEV in Europe, Outlander PHEV is the world's first plug-in hybrid SUV
  • Outlander PHEV delivers SUV capabilities and EV fuel economy


Mitsubishi Motors North America, Inc. (MMNA) today showed the much-anticipated production model of the all-new 2017 Mitsubishi Outlander Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) at the 2016 New York International Auto Show. The Outlander PHEV is a perfect culmination of Mitsubishi's history of automotive excellence: 50 years of electromobility and decades of four-wheel drive technology honed on the international rally circuit. Featuring a highly efficient 2.0-liter gas engine and two high-performance electric motors, and Mitsubishi's superior Super All-Wheel Control (S-AWC) system, the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV is a very capable PHEV. The Outlander PHEV will arrive at Mitsubishi showrooms in fall 2016.

 


"What makes the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV so special is that it offers the best of both worlds with a balance of electric efficiency and long-range practicality," said Don Swearingen, executive vice president, MMNA. "Mitsubishi put its engineering prowess and knowledge to work to create a vehicle that meets the demand of a growing number of consumers who need a car that is capable and environmentally friendly. The Outlander PHEV will offer a high electric range and combined miles per gallon (MPG)."

 

The Outlander PHEV is highlighted by the full-time, twin-electric motor 4WD system that provides quick and optimized torque distribution. The motors are mounted separately at the front and rear axles to deliver precise, responsive 4WD performance with the S-AWC system ensuring excellent driving stability and intuitive, linear handling. The battery that supplies the electricity for the motors is a high-capacity 12kWh lithium-ion battery pack.

 

Three drive modes are available: EV (full electric mode), series hybrid (electric power with generator operation) and parallel hybrid (engine power and electric motor assistance). The PHEV system automatically selects the most efficient drive mode given the road conditions and other factors. The system also features a regenerative braking mode, where electricity is captured under braking.

 

The S-AWC system found on the Outlander PHEV is a specialized application of Lancer Evolution-derived Super All-Wheel Control developed specifically for the Outlander PHEV's unique twin electric motor configuration for maximum performance, efficiency, tractability and safety.

 

Advanced safety and convenience features will be available on Outlander PHEV, including: Multi-Around view Camera Monitor, Forward Collision Mitigation with pedestrian detection capability, Blind Spot Monitoring with Rear Cross Traffic Alert (RCTA), and available smartphone integrations including Apple CarPlay™, the smarter, safer way to use your iPhone in the car, lets drivers make calls, get directions optimized for traffic conditions, listen to music, and access messages. It will also support Android Auto™ extends the Android™ platform into the car in a way that's purpose-built for driving.

 

"As previously stated, Mitsubishi's future is crossover utility vehicles and electrified vehicles. Today we are showing the first piece of that plan," said Swearingen.


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Interesting, the Mirage reminds me of cheap entry little run about for your highschool or college kid. The Outlander PHEV seems to have some cool tech, but the front nose yells Lexus Predator Knock off.

 

Neither one inspires me to want to own them.

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Interesting, the Mirage reminds me of cheap entry little run about for your highschool or college kid.

 

Fun Fact: 95% of all students would ask for extra homework and abstinence education over a Mitsubishi Mirage. 

 

:roflmao:

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one of my recent places of a work,  a young kid fresh out of tech school and his first real job, bought a new Versa and was pretty amped about it.  He was never going to get money from his family to buy anything and he wasn't getting paid much.  But the low price of the Versa and being new meant it was something the first time buyer could get into.

 

And he likes it....i think the Mirage sedan looks nicer than the hatch and if all it does is provide a decent entry into the city car / low cost / first time buyer car, to me that's alright.  Especially with the warranty Mits has.

 

Its not serious machinery......but that's ok here.  As long as its relatively safe.  I wish it had about 40 more hp though.

 

Local mits dealer had some new carry over mirages listed as best price right under 10k recently.......

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Interesting, the Mirage reminds me of cheap entry little run about for your highschool or college kid.

 

Fun Fact: 95% of all students would ask for extra homework and abstinence education over a Mitsubishi Mirage. 

 

Hahahaha I love it! 

 

People buy Mitsubishis..? 

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