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William Maley

This Isn't the Lamborghini Urus Mule You're Looking For

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The internet was ablaze this morning when a picture popped up on twitter showing what looked to be a mule for the upcoming Lamborghini Urus SUV. Top Gear magazine’s Editor-at-Large Rowan Horncastle took a picture of the vehicle sitting in a parking lot at Munich airport. But when we took a look at said picture, something felt off. If you closely at the front, you'll notice tape that has 'Lamborghini' printed on it. I don't know about you, but I don't think an automaker would put tape with their name on it for a test vehicle.

It seems our feeling was correct. CarScoops was able to obtain another picture which reveals this isn't a Urus mule. Instead, it is an Audi Q7 wrapped in camouflage and featuring 'Lamborghini' stickers. This vehicle is being used by a dealer located in Nürnberg to promote it. We should note that the Urus will use the platform that underpins the Q7.

Source: Twitter, CarScoops
Pic Credit: Rowan Horncastle on Twitter


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