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William Maley

GM News: More Downtime Comes To GM's Lordstown Plant

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General Motors has extended the plant shutdown at their Lordstown, Ohio plant by 'several weeks' as a way to help cut back on the inventory of the Chevrolet Cruzes.

According to The Detroit News, workers at the plant were notified of the extension this morning. GM did not say how long the extension would be. Robert Morales, president of UAW Local 1714 said the union doesn't have any information on how long the shutdown will last.

GM has been trying to reduce the amount of Cruzes sitting around. Back in November, GM cut a shift at the plant which affected 1,243 workers. The good news is that Cruze inventory has dropped from a 121-day supply that we reported in December to around a 100-day supply. 

Cruze sales in January increased 38.9 percent to 19,949 units.

Source: The Detroit News
Pic Credit: William Maley for Cheers & Gears


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Small car market is still slow plus way too big msrp's = plant shutdown. 

Gas prices will go up though.  

Old Cruze was so well known and recognized. The new one isn't recognizable in comparison. There hasn't been any advertising either really. 

Get the price down. Advertise it. Hope gas prices go up a bit. 

New equinox will sell yuge

 

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While it does not need to drop to cavalier/cobalt prices, a drop is really needed.

They have cheap leases, which will help, but it's going to dump a bunch back in a few years driving down value to cavalier like levels. Time to throw some cash on the hood and get it back under 20 grand for a start....

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Here is what I see.

#1 The car looks too much like most other cars on the market. The last gen at least stood out.

#2 I would not lower the price but I would do a better job on packages and bring more added value to the models going head to head with Kia and Hyundai. Price per month is the major point to this class and if you can offer a better optioned car for the same price the better you will do. Lest face it the better car in this class does nto always lead sales.

#3 Market this car better. I see so little on it and I suspect with it blending in with the other imports many miss out what it is. They recently marketed the hatch but not so much the sedan.

Finally. lets face it this is not the most styling car GM has. Not bad but they have and could do better. Even the Volt with the slight changes looks better. Even the Hatch was an improvement.

The last Cruze was really a well balanced and well done car and the going will be tougher for this car now that it has fallen in line with the others.

I know someone will come in here saying oh we need a SS and the Diesel but even then that is going to account for less than 15K cars at best.  They need to address the core mid pack model in price, options and styling.

I suspect there will be changes but not for 2 years.

Edited by hyperv6

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When did the new Cruze go on sale?  I think I've only seen two so far, both on a Chevy dealer's lot.  They seem invisible.  

When did the new Cruze go on sale?  I think I've only seen two so far, both on a Chevy dealer's lot.  They seem invisible.  

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