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Fumes: Stop Re-naming My Car!

fumes

Cort Stevens
Editor/Reporter - CheersandGears.com
March 21, 2012


Toyota Camry. Honda Accord.

Since 1982 and 1976 respectively, these two models have evolved and changed with the times, without enduring a name change. Similar history can be traced for such entries as the Honda Odyssey. The first one wasn't much about which to write, but Honda persevered with the name and developed it into a top seller in its segment.

While some examples of continuous monickers don't celebrate similar history, the names have stuck. For instance, the Nissan Quest, first available in 1993 (with a re-badge model sold as the Mercury Villager), is today in its fourth generation even though none of the variations have particularly resonated with buyers.

Yet, American manufacturers have a knack for giving us a plethora of different names for virtually the same model. GM, Ford and Chrysler do this, perhaps too well.





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15 Comments

Good read!

It does make it hard to be brand loyal when you're not sure your car is even going to be sticking around in a few years...
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True. The only (partial) defense I can make is the switch from RWD to FWD requiring a new name. The Accord was never a RWD car and the Camry replaced the RWD Corona in '83. Chevy is the worst offender here, but that is mostly because the (car) product line is confused. The trucks (all three domestics) are mostly quite consistent over the last 30 years or more.
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Why I love my Suburban, Escalade, etc. All of my vehicles are GM trucks or SUV's and so I have not had this name headache to deal wtih. :P

I do agree, GM and Ford seem to be the worst at changing names for the same bloody car line.
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Changing the names so often confuses buyers and makes it difficult to achieve brand loyalty! The cars that established GM as a great auto manufacturer had iconic names that endured for decades--Corvette, Bonneville, Eldorado, etc. Learn from history, GM!
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IT is kinda headache inducing trying to keep up with the name changes, GM take note, stop renaming your vehicles every few years. If you are gonna have a new vehicle put it on a new platfor and call it a day!!
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IT is kinda headache inducing trying to keep up with the name changes, GM take note, stop renaming your vehicles every few years. If you are gonna have a new vehicle put it on a new platfor and call it a day!!


Not even that. They should keep the names consistent in a given segment. At least they got Regal right when they brought it back by putting it on a mid-size car as it has always been. Impala is at least going to remain the top of the Chevy sedan heap regardless of which wheels are driving it. Changing the name to Caprice at this point would be a mistake even though the current Impala is at the bottom of the pile in perception in its segment.

The platform can change over and over, look at how many platforms the Accord has been on, but the naming needs to be consistent.
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Olds, nuff said right there man!!
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One plus side to the name changing - if you say "I have a Cobalt", you know exactly what they have (outside of particular specs).

Still, since most of the public doesn't pay enough attention to cars to keep track of the gazillion different model names, I agree that it is probably very helpful toward image building (and thus marketing) to stick with the same names long-term. That way when someone says "I love my Impala", it may help sell a new one, even if the person who said it was talking about their early 90's car that has absolutely nothing to do with the current model.
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"I've always driven Toronados" is a badge I'd wear with pride.
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Y'know, Lamborghini, Ferrari, and Rolls-Royce have almost never used the same car name for two generations in a row. Granted, their generations seem to last longer than typical passenger cars, and it probably has more to do with maintaining a perception of exclusivity, but I just thought I'd bring it up.
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different kind of market. Jaguar has the XJ since forever
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I would not be happy if GM kept changing the name of the Suburban or Yukon. Names need to carry on through good and bad times. This is the name recognition one wants.

Only time a name change should be warranted is like the Nova I believe in spanish community it ment "No Go" or something like that.

Names really need to be thought out for the sake of the image of a company, good will it builds.
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Only time a name change should be warranted is like the Nova I believe in spanish community it ment "No Go" or something like that.


That was never the case. Snopes has a great debunk of this myth. http://www.snopes.co...sxlate/nova.asp
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Only time a name change should be warranted is like the Nova I believe in spanish community it ment "No Go" or something like that.


That was never the case. Snopes has a great debunk of this myth. http://www.snopes.co...sxlate/nova.asp


Thanks for the post as that was an outstanding read on the history of this story. I actually heard it the first time from a worker at my local family owned Chevy dealership. I had also heard it from my dad and others in the industry and never thought to research it more.

I forwarded the link to a friend who is a mechanic at that dealership and he read it and could not believe it as he swears that is the truth. Now they have a debate going on as to if snopes has this right or not. :P

Amazing how someone from a position of knowledge can keep a story like this going on for a long time.
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The only (partial) defense I can make is the switch from RWD to FWD requiring a new name. The Accord was never a RWD car and the Camry replaced the RWD Corona in '83.


Trouble with this, as I see it, though, is that GM isn't even consistent, especially when you look at the Citation that replaced the Nova, while the Omega name remained. On TOP of that, while the Accord was never a RWD car, if I remember correctly, the Civic was....


At any rate ... as I've told Drew and others, I had a blast writing this editorial, partly because I love history & timelines of cars, roads, etc. I hope that shows through in the article....




Cort | 38.m.IL | pigValve + paceMaker + cowValve | 5 MCs + 1 Caprice Classic
CHD.MCs.CC + RoadTrips.hobbies.RadioShows.us66 = http://www.chevyasylum.com/cort
* rNw-CC+event: http://rdwhl-caprice...rd=whatsgoingon *
"We missed a page or 2 somehow" __ Suzy Boggus __ 'Cinderella'
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