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  • William Maley
    William Maley

    Acura Investigating CDX Crossover For U.S.

      A crossover being sold in China could be arriving in the U.S.

    The appetite Americans have for crossovers is quite large and automakers are trying their best to appease this. Acura for its part is looking at whether it should bring the subcompact CDX crossover to the U.S.

    Introduced for Chinese market last year, the CDX is underpinned by the same platform as the Honda HR-V. Power comes from a 1.5L turbo-four from the Civic and an eight-speed DCT. 

    “It’s a model that interests a lot of our people, so we have our R&D guys looking into the possibility,” said Jon Ikeda, group vice president for Acura to Wards Auto.

    For Acura to bring the CDX over to the U.S., they would need to make a number of changes for the vehicle to meet the various regulations here.

    Ikeda also revealed the brand is looking into derivatives of existing models to build up its crossover lineup. A possibility is a larger CUV with a more spacious third-row. But Ikeda does say Acura "needs to be mindful of its performance and luxury direction."

    “There are many, many things we could do with derivatives of our vehicles. I’m never going to say never…(but) we have to be smart with how we approach it.”

    Source: Wards Auto

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    Seems like a no brainer to try.  A less utilitarian HRV with the 1.5t would probably find some buyers if priced and equipped right.  It has more cargo room than most subcompact CUV's and compact hatchbacks.  

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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    I would say it is a 100% chance that they bring it here.  Crossovers are on fire, small crossovers are on fire.  And as far as Acura being worried about image as a "performance brand" outside of the NSX their most powerful vehicle has 320 hp, they are not a performance brand.  Ford has faster sedans and SUVs than Acura.

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    Who would Buy a subcompact CUV such as the Acura CDX here in the USA, particularly a luxury one?  I fail to see where there would be any space to sit in it and drive it.  It is not as if subcompact CARS are on fire from a sales perspective.

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    18 hours ago, riviera74 said:

    Who would Buy a subcompact CUV such as the Acura CDX here in the USA, particularly a luxury one?  I fail to see where there would be any space to sit in it and drive it.  It is not as if subcompact CARS are on fire from a sales perspective.

    Me.

    I bought an Encore when it was first released and it has served us well.

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    19 minutes ago, Drew Dowdell said:

    Me.

    I bought an Encore when it was first released and it has served us well.

    A small vehicle is just the berries for an urban city like Pittsburgh or Columbus where you have to get in and out of tight spaces and park in weird places.

    23 hours ago, Drew Dowdell said:

    Of course they'll bring it here.... it's the fastest growing segment

    Exactly.

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    On 4/29/2017 at 3:03 PM, Drew Dowdell said:

    Me.

    I bought an Encore when it was first released and it has served us well.

    Not luxury like the Buick, but my sister loves her Trax.  I fit in it just fine, and it's quite pleasant to drive, around town and on road trips..subcompact vehicles today seem quite refined compared to '80s models I've experienced long ago..(a new 4cyl subcompact SUV was way more desirable to her than a dying Northstar Caddy). 

    It's a no-brainer that they will sell it here, since they already have the HR-V here.  

    Edited by Cubical-aka-Moltar
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    19 hours ago, Cubical-aka-Moltar said:

    Not luxury like the Buick, but my sister loves her Trax.  I fit in it just fine, and it's quite pleasant to drive, around town and on road trips..subcompact vehicles today seem quite refined compared to '80s models I've experienced long ago..(a new 4cyl subcompact SUV was way more desirable to her than a dying Northstar Caddy). 

    It's a no-brainer that they will sell it here, since they already have the HR-V here.  

    The Trax/Encore specifically have an unusually good amount of front driver room for such small vehicles.

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    26 minutes ago, A Horse With No Name said:

    Seating position in both is rather agreeable as well.

    Indeed... I feel very comfortable in the car when it's just the two of us. It's when we try to put 4 adults in there for a long trip that it becomes an issue.  We can do it... but it's tight. 

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    40 minutes ago, Drew Dowdell said:

    Indeed... I feel very comfortable in the car when it's just the two of us. It's when we try to put 4 adults in there for a long trip that it becomes an issue.  We can do it... but it's tight. 

    Try taking a long trip with 4 adults in my MINI Cooper S...you will love the Buick afterwards....

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    2 hours ago, A Horse With No Name said:

    Try taking a long trip with 4 adults in my MINI Cooper S...you will love the Buick afterwards....

    At least on the older ones... I dislike how much outside noise gets into the Mini Cooper that I wouldn't want to take a long trip with just myself.

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    8 minutes ago, Drew Dowdell said:

    At least on the older ones... I dislike how much outside noise gets into the Mini Cooper that I wouldn't want to take a long trip with just myself.

    ..this is why i am really looking forward to getting a better highway cruiser for the next ride.

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    27 minutes ago, A Horse With No Name said:

    ..this is why i am really looking forward to getting a better highway cruiser for the next ride.

    That is why I love my Escalade, so quiet, perfect for comfy road trips. Even buying a 2 or 3 year old version is worth it when you want a great highway cruiser.

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    6 minutes ago, dfelt said:

    That is why I love my Escalade, so quiet, perfect for comfy road trips. Even buying a 2 or 3 year old version is worth it when you want a great highway cruiser.

    You could probably fit an Acura CDX into the bed of an Escalade EXT...... such opposites.

    It seems to be more difficult to make smaller cars quiet. I don't know why that seems to be.  

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    2 hours ago, Drew Dowdell said:

    You could probably fit an Acura CDX into the bed of an Escalade EXT...... such opposites.

    It seems to be more difficult to make smaller cars quiet. I don't know why that seems to be.  

    I believe that without Quiet steel technology and a humongous does of sound deadening material, the short wheel base just transmits all the noise. 

    I notice that the Regular Escalade is more noisy than an ESV version. I also have relatives that own both an RDX and MDX and of course the MDX is quieter than the RDX, Have to believe less sound material is being used in the cheaper RDX.

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    On 4/28/2017 at 11:04 PM, riviera74 said:

    Who would Buy a subcompact CUV such as the Acura CDX here in the USA, particularly a luxury one?  I fail to see where there would be any space to sit in it and drive it.  It is not as if subcompact CARS are on fire from a sales perspective.

    Lots of people.  They could sell an ADX below the CDX if they wanted.  Lexus is building a crossover below the NX.  The Rav4 and CRV have grown, they need vehicles a size class below that which opens the door to smaller than NX and smaller than RDX crossovers.  And they could probably go a size below that to what the Encore is.  I bet Lincoln has a version of the Ford Ecosport within 2 years for $29,900. 

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    On 5/2/2017 at 6:23 PM, Drew Dowdell said:

    The Trax/Encore specifically have an unusually good amount of front driver room for such small vehicles.

    I think Chevy could get a crossover in between Trax and Equinox, and another in between Equinox and Traverse.   Not sure if they could go below the Trax with a  Spark based crossover.   They could give Buick a 4th crossover.  There seems to be no saturation point with these things.  

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    8 hours ago, dfelt said:

    That is why I love my Escalade, so quiet, perfect for comfy road trips. Even buying a 2 or 3 year old version is worth it when you want a great highway cruiser.

    Except for the gas mileage part of it.

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      Welcome Back Acura
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      It does give me hope that Acura is figuring out who it wants to be and excited to see what comes down the road such as the new TLX.
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      Year: 2020
      Make: Acura
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      Trim: A-Spec
      Engine: Turbocharged 2.0L DOHC 16-Valve VTEC Four-Cylinder
      Driveline: 10-Speed Automatic, All-Wheel Drive
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      Torque @ RPM: 280 @ 1,600 - 4,500
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 21/26/23
      Curb Weight: 4,015 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: East Liberty, Ohio
      Base Price: $45,800
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      Options:
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