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  • Drew Dowdell
    Drew Dowdell

    Audi wants to give you all the green lights

      Riding a green wave to smooth driving


    Audi is expanding its Traffic Light Information system to now include speed recommendations to minimize stops.  Audi is the first manufacturer to launch Green Light Optimized Speed Advisory (GLOSA) in the U.S. 

    GLOSA uses the position of the vehicle and traffic signal information to display a speed recommendation on the dash to reduce the number of stops at red lights.  The distance to the stop, signal timing, and speed limit are all combined to produce an optimized speed.

    Over 4,700 intersections in 13 U.S. metro areas support the technology. 

    Select 2017 and 2018 and newer models use an onboard 4G LTE connection to monitor live traffic signal information. When the light is red, the system will display a Time-to-Green indicator on the dash. 

    In future, this Vehicle-to-Infrastructure (V2I) technology could be used to optimize navigation routing, vehicle start/stop function, and other predictive services to reduce traffic congestion.

    Audi press release on page 2.


    Audi expands Traffic Light Information - now includes speed recommendations to minimize stops

     

    • Audi first manufacturer to launch Green Light Optimized Speed Advisory (GLOSA) in U.S.
    • GLOSA provides speed recommendations to minimize stops at red lights and helps reduce driver stress
    • Audi Traffic Light Information (TLI) now available in 13 metro areas

    HERNDON, Va., February 19, 2019 – Audi of America announced today an expansion of Traffic Light Information to include Green Light Optimized Speed Advisory (GLOSA), another industry first in vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I) technologies from the brand. GLOSA can provide speed recommendations to Audi drivers of select 2017 and newer models that can assist drivers in catching the “green wave,” helping to reduce the number of stops at red lights.

    GLOSA uses traffic signal information and the current position of a vehicle to display a speed recommendation intended to allow drivers to pass traffic lights during a green interval, in order to help reduce the number of stops at red lights. The distance to stop, the speed limit profile for the area, and the signal timing plans, are all used to calculate the speed recommendation displayed to the driver.

    Survey data from the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety shows that the average American driver spends nearly 300 hours a year behind the wheel, the equivalent to seven 40-hour weeks at the office. Providing drivers with additional information, such as green light optimized speed advisories, can help reduce anxiety and improve a driver’s comfort during their time behind the wheel.

    “Audi is committed to moving America in many ways, including through the development of industry-leading connectivity and mobility solutions,” said Mark Del Rosso, president, Audi of America. “Not only do vehicle-to-infrastructure technologies like GLOSA benefit drivers today, they’re also the critical steps needed as we continue toward an automated future.”

    In 2016, Audi, in collaboration with Traffic Technology Services (TTS), launched Traffic Light Information, an Audi connect PRIME feature that enables the car to communicate with the infrastructure in certain cities and metropolitan areas across the U.S. Today, more than 4,700 intersections support both the “time-to-green” and GLOSA functionalities. Enabled metro areas include: Dallas, Denver, Gainesville, Fla.; Houston, Kansas City, Kansas; Las Vegas, Los Angeles, New York City, Orlando, Fla.; Phoenix, Portland, Ore.; San Francisco, and Washington, D.C. and northern Virginia.

    “VDOT’s collaboration with Audi, TTS, and other innovative companies leverages the Commonwealth’s data and vehicle-to-infrastructure communications, preparing us for more connected and automated vehicles on our roadways,” said Virginia Secretary of Transportation Shannon Valentine. “We are committed to improving safety, reducing congestion and exploring opportunities to partner with the private sector.”

    Time-to-Green
    Traffic Light Information, an Audi connect PRIME feature available on select 2017, 2018 and newer models, enables the car to communicate with the infrastructure in certain cities and metropolitan areas across the U.S.

    When one of these select Audi models approaches a connected traffic light, it receives real-time signal information from the traffic management system that monitors traffic lights via the on-board 4G LTE data connection. When the light is red, the TLI feature will display the time remaining until the signal changes to green in the instrument cluster in front of the driver or in the head-up display (if equipped). This “time-to-green” information helps reduce stress by letting the driver know approximately how much time remains before the light changes.

    Future iterations of V2I technology could include integration with the vehicle’s start/stop function, optimized navigation routing, and other predictive services. All of these services are designed to help reduce congestion and enhance mobility on crowded roadways.

    Source: Audi USA

     



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    Sounds like a technology that would go well with automated driverless auto's.

    Human nature is to get from A to B as fast as you can and ignoring signals by cutting through parking lots, alley ways, etc. 

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    1 hour ago, Drew Dowdell said:

    I added a video to the article of the system in action

    Thank you for posting the video. I now wonder how many people who already cannot balance cellphone use with driving will be distracted by this trying to optimize their speed to the system to hit all green lights.

    I do question the value of this.

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    3 minutes ago, dfelt said:

    Thank you for posting the video. I now wonder how many people who already cannot balance cellphone use with driving will be distracted by this trying to optimize their speed to the system to hit all green lights.

    I do question the value of this.

    I don't.  What I would want it to do is interact with the adaptive cruise control and automagically optimize my trip to the lights.

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    13 minutes ago, Drew Dowdell said:

    I don't.  What I would want it to do is interact with the adaptive cruise control and automagically optimize my trip to the lights.

    As long as all light systems relay this info, then I would agree with you that having this optimize with your adaptive cruise control would be an outstanding feature then.

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    All this sounds good and all, but you need a city where the lights are actually synchronized.

    Montreal and the entire province of Quebec does not follow this kind of...um...witchcraft. Why make life easier for us drivers? Also, Montreal is seeing all kinds of roads closures and detours due to construction and repair sites. This will be a thing for the next 10-15 years.  Yipee!!!

    But yeah, could be a good little technology, if it doesnt distract the driver... 

     

     

    Edited by oldshurst442

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    I get the concept but I think people using such a system would anoy me. As 442 stated, if the lights are on some kind of timer it may work. However if they are on sensors I could see myself cussing at some driver slowing down for a red light that will not turn green until cars are tripping the sensor. I don't know how much this feature will cost, but whatever the cost is I could do without it. I could also do without people trying to use a feature like that making traffic worse because they don't understand how things work. 

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    9 minutes ago, Scout said:

    I get the concept but I think people using such a system would anoy me. As 442 stated, if the lights are on some kind of timer it may work. However if they are on sensors I could see myself cussing at some driver slowing down for a red light that will not turn green until cars are tripping the sensor. I don't know how much this feature will cost, but whatever the cost is I could do without it. I could also do without people trying to use a feature like that making traffic worse because they don't understand how things work. 

    It's not an addition cost by itself, but it does require an in-car internet subscription. I think most/all Audis come with 4G LTE connection. 

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