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    Average Age Of A Vehicle In The U.S. Stands At 11.4 Years


    William Maley

    Staff Writer - CheersandGears.com

    August 6, 2013

    New data from R.L. Polk released today shows that the average age of a vehicle in the U.S. stands at a record high of 11.4 years. That's 0.2 years higher from last year and and nearly two full years higher than in 2007.

    Passenger cars currently are the oldest vehicles on the road with an average of 11.4 years. Light trucks are not that far behind with an average age of 11.3 years.

    Interestingly, the volume of vehicles between 6 and 11 years old actually decreased somewhat, but the volume of light vehicles 12 years and older jumped by 20 percent.

    “Cars are just lasting longer,” said Mark Seng, a Polk vice president.

    Seng explained that newer cars are better built and provide much more quality. Also, many people are keeping their vehicles to avoid monthly payments.

    Polk expects the average age of vehicles to stay at current levels for the next five years, despite the rise in vehicle sales.

    Source: The Detroit News

    William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.

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    Yup, that one I am well aware of, 257 million auto in this country over 11 years of age or older.

    When you consider what CNG - Compressed Natural Gas costs compared to petrol. It totally justifies the up front cost of home fueling hardware as the savings over the long haul is huge. Over ten years you can save over $20K dollars and more.

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    I'm driving my Jeep and the DTS these days, both MY 2000....Jeep at 146k miles, DTS at 105k..going to have to get something new(er) sooner or later, though.

    Edited by Cubical-aka-Moltar
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    11.3 years ago I was driving my 2002 Base Plus shortbed, reg cab Silverado, with shaved emblems, Escalade instrument cluster, Gibson cat-back exhaust system, GMC Sierra uplevel split bench seat with center armrest, and Tahoe grille. I was stylin'. That truck is still around town, owned by an old guy who is a Boy Scout leader.

    That got traded on an '03 ION Quad Coupe (POS!)

    Then... '04 Colorado ext cab Z71 4X4

    '07 Sierra SLE Reg Cab shortbed

    '09 Cobalt coupe

    '10 Colorado ext cab Z85 4X4

    '11 Fiesta SE hatch (total loss)

    '12 Cruze

    '12 Patriot

    and my current ride... '13 Beetle TDi. Jeez man...

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    I drive a 2005 Ford Taurus with 108k miles on it, I plan on driving it until the wheels fall off and then I will think about buying a used car. There is no way I want to get stuck with another new car payment. MY soon to be ex~wife and I had new car payments for 10 years, that's long enough to last a life time!

    Greg

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    I think to some extent people are just making their cars last longer. They are comparing this to 2007 data, which was right around the time gas started going through the roof and a year before the economy completely tanked. Many people have since gone through bankruptcies, lost their homes, lost their retirements, etc... not to mention the value of their houses disappeared. It only makes sense that people aren't trading in their cars every couple of years for a newer model any more.

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    Or due to the EPA and Auto companies pushing to have air streamed jelly beans we have lost the ability to have nice designs that people like so people are holding onto what they like and making them last since it is cheaper.

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    We've had Jellybeans since the 96 Wbodies and the fish Taurus.. I don't people are still holding on to their 87 olds cutlass supreme and not buying new just because of styling.

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    In some cases, the auto makers just are not providing what the public really wants. I can tell you GM would move a ton of full size SUV's aka Suburbans and Yukon XL's if they had it with a diesel v8. Better would be cng available or a hybrid VOLT style.

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