• Sign in to follow this  
    Followers 0

    Fewer Americans Are Carrying Driver Licenses


    • It Isn't Only Teens

    The past few years have seen studies come out that reveal teenagers are less likely to have a driver's license. But a new study from the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute (UMTRI) says teens aren't the only group that are passing on a license.

     

    The study which looked at data from 1983 to 2014 reveals that every age group has seen a decrease in carrying a driver;s license.

    • 24.5 percent of Americans aged 16 carried a license in 2014. This is down 6.6 percent from 2008 where 27.5 percent carried one.
    • 76.7 percent of Americans aged 20 to 24 have a license in 2014, compared to 82 percent in 2008.
    • A number of older Americans aren't also carrying licenses either. In the 40 to 59 age bracket, the percentage of those who have a license has dropped 3 percent from 2008 to 2014.


    Sadly, the study doesn't go into why the amount of people carrying licenses has gone down. But we have a couple possible reasons to it:

    • The average price of a vehicle has been increasing over the years. Young Americans don't have the income to purchase one.
    • A fair number of people are moving back into the city, meaning they are utilizing public transportation systems or using an alternative form of transportation.

     

    Source: UMTRI

    0


    Sign in to follow this  
    Followers 0


    User Feedback


    We would see a bigger drop if they enforced having to read, write and speak english to get their drivers license. To many states including Washington where I live allow people to take their drivers test with an interpreter so they get to drive. F the ability to communicate to police, fire or medical. Politicians have screwed this country over by implying that driving is a right. It is NOT it is a Privilege you earn. We need to enforce this rather than allowing timed non speaking english people to drive on the roads and then get over into the left lane going 20+ under the posted speed limit.

    2

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Washington state has a law for driving too slow in the left lane of which is costs you $136 if you are 10mph or slower in the left lane. The new added fees are being put in place to force people to obey the using left lane to pass and not go slow causing cars to back up or pass on the right.

     

    The proposed law would add another fine for continuously driving at slow speeds, based on how far below the speed limit they are traveling.

    Between 1 and 5 mph, the extra fine would be $27. That would go up to $37 for 6 to 10 mph below the maximum speed limit; $52 for 11 to 15 mph and $67 for 16 to 20 mph.

    Bill can be found here:

    http://app.leg.wa.gov/billinfo/summary.aspx?bill=6105&year=2015

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Yeah, man. I'd be in the numbers too, but I'm in Canada.

     

    Cars are practical still, but the cash flow to finance the investment isn't there when you're doing post-secondary education.

     

    But saving money is gud, na?

    1

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    many of the younger set have no trouble forking out coin for cell phones and plan.  But the thought of even 200 bucks for a car payment rankles them.

     

    Mom and dad drove them everywhere for so long, then it comes time that you gotta get yer own ride, pay for it, and drive yourself.  Oh the horror.  Can't work from your basement, all of ya.  Gotta go to your job so you can make money.  That's how it works.  Sad that all those years of college doesn't guarantee employment or a decent wage but if the recession hadn't wiped out jobs across all demographics and hadn't decimated average wages so much, the system would not have developed such difficult barriers to get into the employment world.

     

    Mass transit is a great option for those that don't want to own a car.  But you still pay for that too, and you don't have total freedom.  

     

    Car sharing may be a great scam for quite awhile.  But renting cars or group ownership will not save a lot of money vs single ownership over time.  Ford's group lease/buy thing just means they can ask more for the price of the vehicle.  Nice scam!  plus then you are stuck driving the vehicle your co owner has been beating up on.

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    many of the younger set have no trouble forking out coin for cell phones and plan.  But the thought of even 200 bucks for a car payment rankles them.

     

    Mom and dad drove them everywhere for so long, then it comes time that you gotta get yer own ride, pay for it, and drive yourself.  Oh the horror.  Can't work from your basement, all of ya.  Gotta go to your job so you can make money.  That's how it works.  Sad that all those years of college doesn't guarantee employment or a decent wage but if the recession hadn't wiped out jobs across all demographics and hadn't decimated average wages so much, the system would not have developed such difficult barriers to get into the employment world.

     

    Mass transit is a great option for those that don't want to own a car.  But you still pay for that too, and you don't have total freedom.  

     

    Car sharing may be a great scam for quite awhile.  But renting cars or group ownership will not save a lot of money vs single ownership over time.  Ford's group lease/buy thing just means they can ask more for the price of the vehicle.  Nice scam!  plus then you are stuck driving the vehicle your co owner has been beating up on.

     

    I have a cellphone from 6 years ago and it itself was hand-me-down.

     

    And I recently downgraded my cell plan. So I guess I am a saving connoisseur.

     

    Yeah, though I have yet to get much out of education just yet. The thing is it's all about the extra curriculars and stuffs and networking and the more I try those things the more bewildered I get. 

     

    But then there's the people I flat out envy.

     

    Their tuition is taken care of, they live close to campus, and they have awesome executive positions in clubs and then they win, and they repeat the cycle. It's very clean and appears organized.

     

    And me - I hate to admit it, but yeah, I'm like a rusty Jeep Comanche in a sea of Denalis.

     

    But the scale factor is that I'm like the kiddie toy Jeep I used to have when I was helpless diaper dumpster, while the rest of these folks are the real life bruisers, so the rusty Comanche doesn't get noticed. It just gets steamrolled and owned...again and again....rinse and repeat. 

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

    Guest
    You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
    Add a comment...

    ×   You have pasted content with formatting.   Remove formatting

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor




  • Popular Stories

  • Similar Content

    • By William Maley
      To say we were slightly disappointed to find out that the U.S.-Spec Toyota C-HR would only come with a 2.0L four-cylinder producing 144 horsepower would be an understatement. The European-spec C-HR has the choice of either a turbocharged 1.2L four or a hybrid, but neither of these powertrains will be showing up in the U.S.
      Car and Driver spoke with the C-HR's chief engineer, Hiroyuki Koba to find out why. Koba didn't say why the turbocharged 1.2L would not come to the U.S., but we're guessing Toyota didn't want to put the effort in getting this engine certified for the U.S. Also, performance numbers between the 2.0L and turbo 1.2L are similar (11 seconds for the 2.0 to hit 60 mph, 11.1 seconds for the 1.2).
      As for the hybrid, Koba said the decision comes down to the market, not engineering. At the moment, Toyota doesn't see the demand for this model in the U.S.
      Koba did admit there is a possibility for a more powerful version of the C-HR, but quickly added there aren't plans for this at the moment.
      Source: Car and Driver

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      To say we were slightly disappointed to find out that the U.S.-Spec Toyota C-HR would only come with a 2.0L four-cylinder producing 144 horsepower would be an understatement. The European-spec C-HR has the choice of either a turbocharged 1.2L four or a hybrid, but neither of these powertrains will be showing up in the U.S.
      Car and Driver spoke with the C-HR's chief engineer, Hiroyuki Koba to find out why. Koba didn't say why the turbocharged 1.2L would not come to the U.S., but we're guessing Toyota didn't want to put the effort in getting this engine certified for the U.S. Also, performance numbers between the 2.0L and turbo 1.2L are similar (11 seconds for the 2.0 to hit 60 mph, 11.1 seconds for the 1.2).
      As for the hybrid, Koba said the decision comes down to the market, not engineering. At the moment, Toyota doesn't see the demand for this model in the U.S.
      Koba did admit there is a possibility for a more powerful version of the C-HR, but quickly added there aren't plans for this at the moment.
      Source: Car and Driver
    • By William Maley
      Will Volkswagen make a return with diesels to the U.S. or not? Unfortunately, we're getting mixed messages on this issue.
      Back in July, Volkswagen of America CEO Hinrich Woebcken said diesel would not a core element of the brand going forward. But they could start selling a diesel vehicle in the U.S. again if it makes sense.
      “We are not stopping diesel. Wherever diesel makes sense as a package to the car, we’ll continue. But in reality, we have to accept that the high percentage of diesels that we had before will not come back again,” said Woebcken.
      Last week in an interview with Motor Trend, Woebcken reiterated his earlier statement with the automaker not ruling out diesels in the future. 
      But this week, Volkswagen brand chief Herbert Diess told German business paper Handelsblatt that diesel will not be returning to Volkswagen's U.S. lineup.
      "At the moment we assume that we will offer no new diesel vehicles in the U.S," said Diess. “The reason is the legal framework.”
      Who to believe? We're not sure ourselves. Stay tuned.
      Source: Motor Trend, Handelsblatt, Reuters

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      Will Volkswagen make a return with diesels to the U.S. or not? Unfortunately, we're getting mixed messages on this issue.
      Back in July, Volkswagen of America CEO Hinrich Woebcken said diesel would not a core element of the brand going forward. But they could start selling a diesel vehicle in the U.S. again if it makes sense.
      “We are not stopping diesel. Wherever diesel makes sense as a package to the car, we’ll continue. But in reality, we have to accept that the high percentage of diesels that we had before will not come back again,” said Woebcken.
      Last week in an interview with Motor Trend, Woebcken reiterated his earlier statement with the automaker not ruling out diesels in the future. 
      But this week, Volkswagen brand chief Herbert Diess told German business paper Handelsblatt that diesel will not be returning to Volkswagen's U.S. lineup.
      "At the moment we assume that we will offer no new diesel vehicles in the U.S," said Diess. “The reason is the legal framework.”
      Who to believe? We're not sure ourselves. Stay tuned.
      Source: Motor Trend, Handelsblatt, Reuters
    • By William Maley
      The diesel emission scandal has left Volkswagen at a bit crossroad in a number of areas. One of them deals with their brand identity in the U.S. For a better part of a decade, Volkswagen was known as the brand that sold 'clean diesels'. But the company is working to rebuild and change their identity. Part of that plan is taking diesel and putting it on the backburner.
      Volkswagen Group of America CEO Hinrich Woebcken tells Automotive News that diesel will not be a core element of their identity going forward. That isn't to say diesel will be banished from the brand. Woebcken said the fuel are still in their plans from 2017 to 2019 if they can get regulatory approval. But he did say they are re-evaluating diesel in their future lineup for the U.S.
      “We are not stopping diesel. Wherever diesel makes sense as a package to the car, we’ll continue. But in reality, we have to accept that the high percentage of diesels that we had before will not come back again,” said Woebcken.
      “The regulations from 2019-2020 are going to be so hard that we would have had to find an alternative to a certain extent anyhow. The diesel crisis is forcing us simply to think about this earlier.”
      Volkswagen's image rebuilding process in U.S. will see them at the beginning putting more emphasis on crossovers and all-wheel drive offerings. The first part of this process kicks off with the Golf Alltrack launching later this year. This will be followed by the long-awaited three-row crossover next March or April, and the long-wheelbase version of the Tiguan sometime in the summer.
      In 2020, Volkswagen will launch the first of many electric vehicles using their MEB modular platform in the U.S.
      Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required)

      View full article
  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)