Jump to content
  • William Maley
    William Maley

    Rumorpile: F-Type Could Offer An Electric Powertrain

      Do cats dream of electric powertrains?

    The next-generation Jaguar F-Type is expected to arrive in 2021 and according to a report from Autocar, the company is deciding what powertrains should go into it.

    One option being considered is going with a fully electric powertrain. This would allow designers to push the boundaries of the next F-Type's design. Going electric would also allow for a lower center of gravity if Jaguar was able to mount the batteries below the floor. It is unclear how much power could be on tap, but we would expect a noticeable increase to the 197 horsepower electric motors used in the i-Pace.

    Another powertrain up for consideration is a V8 sourced from BMW. Codenamed Project Jennifer, the V8 in question is a 4.4L twin-turbo producing 640 horsepower and 600 pound-feet of torque - allowing the F-Type to challenge the most powerful Porsche 911s. Why is Jaguar sourcing a V8 from BMW and not developing its own? Blame falling V8 sales.

    Of course, there is the option of offering both gas and electric powertains. While that would limit design freedom by just going with an electric powertrain only, it would widen the appeal of the F-Type.

    One item that is certain is the platform. Autocar reports that the next F-Type will use an aluminum-intensive platform that will help reduce weight and make the interior slightly more spacious. It could also allow Jaguar to build a successor to the XK, something we reported back in May.

    Source: Autocar



    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    Be interesting to see what they end up doing as I had read that they were considering going all electric and just forgoing ICE all together.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    5 hours ago, dfelt said:

    Be interesting to see what they end up doing as I had read that they were considering going all electric and just forgoing ICE all together.

    Forgoing ICE altogether might be brilliant. . . . . or a total disaster if Jaguar/Land Rover do it wrong.  Tesla is not tearing up the car sales charts, luxury or otherwise.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    4 hours ago, riviera74 said:

    Forgoing ICE altogether might be brilliant. . . . . or a total disaster if Jaguar/Land Rover do it wrong.  Tesla is not tearing up the car sales charts, luxury or otherwise.

    Do not tell Musk that. ;) Course if you build a full size truck and SUV plus use an existing real auto assembly line, they could probably build and sell profitable a pure ev product line like Rivian is planning to do.

    • Haha 1

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    18 minutes ago, balthazar said:

    EVERYBODY is "planning on being profitable", yet the gutters & storm drains of history are PACKED with failures.

    True, this just might finally clean house on who is still in the game in 20 years. :P 

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    It seems that old guys in blinding bright golf shirts are the only ones who want to put miles on electric conveyances.  Non-street legal. 

     

    • Haha 2

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Seemingly getting brushed aside in all the talk of 'GM trucks are Too Damned High priced'; the Rivian is coming in at $eventy thou$and dollar$. This is where journalistic hype tips it's hand- the market out there is NOT going to swallow any considerable volume at those prices; it's not a feasible business case.

    Jaguar is just a niche player; going all EV will only cement that status thru at least the next decade.

    • Upvote 1

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    2 hours ago, balthazar said:

    Seemingly getting brushed aside in all the talk of 'GM trucks are Too Damned High priced'; the Rivian is coming in at $eventy thou$and dollar$. This is where journalistic hype tips it's hand- the market out there is NOT going to swallow any considerable volume at those prices; it's not a feasible business case.

    True, they could probably drop $10,000 if they did RWD only as an option, but right now everything is AWD with Torque Vectoring and I suspect enough people will buy Rivian due to the comfy space inside being full size. 

    Full Size EV is a game changer that no one else has touched yet.

    I wonder how much GM would charge for a full size RWD and AWD Pickup? 🤔

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Dave, $10K is not enough. Rivian said something about 1 million sales, didn't they? Tesla has taken 15 years to reach what- 160K/yr with 3 models?
    Silverado. et al, start in the low 30s. Starting where your competition ends their pricing is an iron-clad guarantee of niche-level sales - show me ANY model moving 250K in the US at a $70K base MSRP - I'll wait.

    • Upvote 1

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    7 minutes ago, balthazar said:

     Tesla has taken 15 years to reach what- 160K/yr with 3 models? 

    Edit--about 6 1/2 years.  The Model S started shipping in June 2012.  Or 10 years going back to the Roadster. 

    Edited by Robert Hall

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    19 minutes ago, balthazar said:

    Company was founded in 2003.

     Rivian has been around 9 years it sounds like. It seems EV startup companies have long product gestation periods prior to actual production. 

    Edited by Robert Hall

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    ^ 10-4 : 10 years then; a full decade of production to just eclipse the Chevy Cruze's production. Gains in this segment (IE: EVs) are glacial.

    I suspect some quantity of Model 3 buyers are 'saving face' by ante-ing up to the circa $50K price when they signed on for the "$35K" price. Then again the 2 years wait time has allowed buyer's investments to appreciate enough to offset that huge step-up. :D

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Join the conversation

    You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




  • Similar Content

    • By Anthony Fongaro
      EV-curious. That’s what I would call myself. Someone that is interested in EVs but just hasn’t found the right one. There are many aspects of an EV that is appealing to me. Instant torque, quick acceleration, the ability to charge at your house or apartment, and the continuation of creating semi-autonomous driving. It’s all so exciting! I’m ready to go out and trade in my 2016 Volkswagen GTI for one now! Or am I? Let’s take a quick look at a small field of electric vehicles, starting with the brand new 2020 Porsche Taycan.
      The release of the 2020 Porsche Taycan is a feat in and of itself. The car itself is downright sexy, is has a handsome interior, and performance that is pure Porsche. Over 700 HP for the Turbo S model is impressive. It also costs what you would expect an electric super-Porsche would be since the range topping Taycans are coming out first. These are the Turbo and Turbo S which cost over $150,000. After these come onto the market, less expensive and less powerful versions will come. Would this be the car that I will buy? Sure, once I get that CMO position at a major company. This is a dream electric car, but not one that I would consider just yet. 
      What about an attainable electric car? There are a few on the market that cover the bases. Vehicles like the Hyundai Kona Electric, Chevy Bolt, Nissan Leaf, and others have good to respectable range, decent features, and are not the most expensive vehicles. Average prices of $40,000-$45,000 is a bit steep, but electric cars usually command a premium over gasoline vehicles. They also have good driving aids such as blind spot monitoring and adaptive cruise control, something that my current car has and is top priority for me. They’re all very good cars but with flaws such as build quality and designs that keep me from considering one. My problem is simple: performance. Electric cars have instant torque at 0 RPM and can be extremely fast. These EVs just don’t cut the mustard for me since they are more about range than blistering speed. For around $45,000, I can get a gas-powered car such as a Genesis G70 3.3T that is faster, has better range, and the safety features I want. Let’s continue from good electric vehicles to “the best”.
      Right now, you are probably thinking: “Anthony, you are forgetting the king of electric vehicles. They are synonymous with electric cars and have a huge cult following.” Guess who that is? Yes, that is of course Tesla. You can’t write about electric cars without talking about Tesla. They are a very S 3 X Y R brand indeed. The Model S introduced expensive but seriously quick electric vehicles. The X brought us an odd but much-needed crossover. The 3 is the bread-and-butter maker with a starting price around $40,000, and acceleration that beats almost all vehicles in its class. The Y hasn’t come out yet but is a crossover version of the 3, and the Roadster is a $250,000 supercar. Even though there are three models currently available, I will focus on the Model 3 Performance since that is the one I am most interested in.
      There is a lot to like about the Model 3 Performance. It has “performance” in its name and with 450 HP, it is one of the quickest sedans I’ve ever driven. The instant torque from the motors is intoxicating and it handles well for a heavy vehicle. Does it tick all the boxes to convert to a Tesla-fanatic? No. Why? The interior. I am not a fan of controlling absolutely everything with a touchscreen and not having my speedometer in front of me.
      The Model 3 Performance can have semi-autonomous driving, but it is a $7,000 option. Tesla’s Autopilot driver-assist system is standard and is regarded to be one of the best, if not the best driver-assist system. Tesla has sold over 250,000 Model 3 vehicles and it is a genuinely amazing feat for a young company. The range is good at over 310 miles. Pricing starts at $55,000 and is fully-loaded around $64,000. If you are okay with the minimal interior and styling, get yourself a Model 3. I personally am not a fan of either of those, so onward we go.
      This brings me to a car I am waiting for: The Polestar 2 fastback. Polestar used to be a sub-division of Volvo, like AMG is to Mercedes-Benz. You can still get Polestar-tune Volvos, but Polestar has branched out into their own brand. The Polestar 2 is their first all-electric car. It has over 250 miles of range, 400 HP, and most import to me, gauges that are straight in front of the driver. The design is bold yet looks like an even more modern version of a Volvo. Since Polestar is a sporty company, the performance upgrades include upgraded shocks, brakes, and bigger wheels with Swedish gold seat belts. You get this package mainly for the gold seat belts. Is it pricey at over $60,000? Yes, but it feels justified for the 408 hp and range of 275 miles. 0-60 is said to be around 4.7 seconds but I suspect it will be lower. Will they sell Tesla Model 3 numbers of them? I highly doubt it since they area new brand, but it should be a great competitor to the Tesla Model 3.
      I like the concept of electric vehicles. I know that one day, there will be one charging at my house. Am I ready for an electric car? Yes. Is there any on the market that jumps out at me and gives me the satisfaction I have for my current car at a reasonable price of around $40,000 new? No.
      Do not get me wrong; there are electric cars that make sense for a multitude of situations. Range and charging are getting better, more features are getting added, and manufacturers are creating electric-only ranges of vehicles that will bring down the costs of more performance-oriented vehicles. I can go in-depth about certain electric cars in a future article. For now, I think I will keep my car and wait until something really catches my eye. That, or wait a few years and hope the Porsche Taycan depreciates enough that I can buy one.
       

      View full article
    • By Anthony Fongaro
      EV-curious. That’s what I would call myself. Someone that is interested in EVs but just hasn’t found the right one. There are many aspects of an EV that is appealing to me. Instant torque, quick acceleration, the ability to charge at your house or apartment, and the continuation of creating semi-autonomous driving. It’s all so exciting! I’m ready to go out and trade in my 2016 Volkswagen GTI for one now! Or am I? Let’s take a quick look at a small field of electric vehicles, starting with the brand new 2020 Porsche Taycan.
      The release of the 2020 Porsche Taycan is a feat in and of itself. The car itself is downright sexy, is has a handsome interior, and performance that is pure Porsche. Over 700 HP for the Turbo S model is impressive. It also costs what you would expect an electric super-Porsche would be since the range topping Taycans are coming out first. These are the Turbo and Turbo S which cost over $150,000. After these come onto the market, less expensive and less powerful versions will come. Would this be the car that I will buy? Sure, once I get that CMO position at a major company. This is a dream electric car, but not one that I would consider just yet. 
      What about an attainable electric car? There are a few on the market that cover the bases. Vehicles like the Hyundai Kona Electric, Chevy Bolt, Nissan Leaf, and others have good to respectable range, decent features, and are not the most expensive vehicles. Average prices of $40,000-$45,000 is a bit steep, but electric cars usually command a premium over gasoline vehicles. They also have good driving aids such as blind spot monitoring and adaptive cruise control, something that my current car has and is top priority for me. They’re all very good cars but with flaws such as build quality and designs that keep me from considering one. My problem is simple: performance. Electric cars have instant torque at 0 RPM and can be extremely fast. These EVs just don’t cut the mustard for me since they are more about range than blistering speed. For around $45,000, I can get a gas-powered car such as a Genesis G70 3.3T that is faster, has better range, and the safety features I want. Let’s continue from good electric vehicles to “the best”.
      Right now, you are probably thinking: “Anthony, you are forgetting the king of electric vehicles. They are synonymous with electric cars and have a huge cult following.” Guess who that is? Yes, that is of course Tesla. You can’t write about electric cars without talking about Tesla. They are a very S 3 X Y R brand indeed. The Model S introduced expensive but seriously quick electric vehicles. The X brought us an odd but much-needed crossover. The 3 is the bread-and-butter maker with a starting price around $40,000, and acceleration that beats almost all vehicles in its class. The Y hasn’t come out yet but is a crossover version of the 3, and the Roadster is a $250,000 supercar. Even though there are three models currently available, I will focus on the Model 3 Performance since that is the one I am most interested in.
      There is a lot to like about the Model 3 Performance. It has “performance” in its name and with 450 HP, it is one of the quickest sedans I’ve ever driven. The instant torque from the motors is intoxicating and it handles well for a heavy vehicle. Does it tick all the boxes to convert to a Tesla-fanatic? No. Why? The interior. I am not a fan of controlling absolutely everything with a touchscreen and not having my speedometer in front of me.
      The Model 3 Performance can have semi-autonomous driving, but it is a $7,000 option. Tesla’s Autopilot driver-assist system is standard and is regarded to be one of the best, if not the best driver-assist system. Tesla has sold over 250,000 Model 3 vehicles and it is a genuinely amazing feat for a young company. The range is good at over 310 miles. Pricing starts at $55,000 and is fully-loaded around $64,000. If you are okay with the minimal interior and styling, get yourself a Model 3. I personally am not a fan of either of those, so onward we go.
      This brings me to a car I am waiting for: The Polestar 2 fastback. Polestar used to be a sub-division of Volvo, like AMG is to Mercedes-Benz. You can still get Polestar-tune Volvos, but Polestar has branched out into their own brand. The Polestar 2 is their first all-electric car. It has over 250 miles of range, 400 HP, and most import to me, gauges that are straight in front of the driver. The design is bold yet looks like an even more modern version of a Volvo. Since Polestar is a sporty company, the performance upgrades include upgraded shocks, brakes, and bigger wheels with Swedish gold seat belts. You get this package mainly for the gold seat belts. Is it pricey at over $60,000? Yes, but it feels justified for the 408 hp and range of 275 miles. 0-60 is said to be around 4.7 seconds but I suspect it will be lower. Will they sell Tesla Model 3 numbers of them? I highly doubt it since they area new brand, but it should be a great competitor to the Tesla Model 3.
      I like the concept of electric vehicles. I know that one day, there will be one charging at my house. Am I ready for an electric car? Yes. Is there any on the market that jumps out at me and gives me the satisfaction I have for my current car at a reasonable price of around $40,000 new? No.
      Do not get me wrong; there are electric cars that make sense for a multitude of situations. Range and charging are getting better, more features are getting added, and manufacturers are creating electric-only ranges of vehicles that will bring down the costs of more performance-oriented vehicles. I can go in-depth about certain electric cars in a future article. For now, I think I will keep my car and wait until something really catches my eye. That, or wait a few years and hope the Porsche Taycan depreciates enough that I can buy one.
       
    • By Drew Dowdell
      Jaguar Land Rover already has an agreement with BMW to use BMW sourced engines in future vehicles, but now a report from Autocar says that the company could use a BMW sourced platform for some future small vehicles as well.  Jaguar wants to increase its "Pace" lineup with an "A-Pace" and "B-Pace", small crossover coupes that would use BMW's front-wheel drive FAAR platform that underpins the X1, X2, and eventually the entire Mini linup. 
      Over at Land Rover, there is a possible revival of the Freelander based on the same FAAR platform to fill the entry level spot in the Land Rover showroom. Even the larger Evoque and Discovery Sport could move to FAAR when their current runs are up mid to late next decade. Naturally, as all new platforms are today, they are engineered to accept electrification in the form of electric assist, hybrids, or even pure electric powertrains. 
      If all this comes to fruition, vehicles using the FAAR platform could top 1.5 million in global sales annually. 

      View full article
    • By Drew Dowdell
      Jaguar Land Rover already has an agreement with BMW to use BMW sourced engines in future vehicles, but now a report from Autocar says that the company could use a BMW sourced platform for some future small vehicles as well.  Jaguar wants to increase its "Pace" lineup with an "A-Pace" and "B-Pace", small crossover coupes that would use BMW's front-wheel drive FAAR platform that underpins the X1, X2, and eventually the entire Mini linup. 
      Over at Land Rover, there is a possible revival of the Freelander based on the same FAAR platform to fill the entry level spot in the Land Rover showroom. Even the larger Evoque and Discovery Sport could move to FAAR when their current runs are up mid to late next decade. Naturally, as all new platforms are today, they are engineered to accept electrification in the form of electric assist, hybrids, or even pure electric powertrains. 
      If all this comes to fruition, vehicles using the FAAR platform could top 1.5 million in global sales annually. 
    • By Drew Dowdell
      It's no secret that Mini's fortunes have not been good lately. In the first half of this year, Mini has only moved 17,583 cars of its five model lineup in the U.S. Parent company BMW needs to do something. Last month, Mini unveiled the all-electric version of the Mini-Cooper with a range between 146 and 167 miles.  Now, a report out from Automobile Magazine says that Mini has canceled the internal combustion engine versions for the entire model range in the next generation of cars. 
      Starting in 2023, Mini will use a skateboard style chassis to underpin the entire lineup.  There will be a new downsized mini... a MiniMini, a more compact 3-door version, and a Mini crossover.  All would be front-wheel drive and offer 35-kWh or 50-kWh battery packs.  Part of the development is being done by China's Great Wall Motors. 
      The electric Minis will be built in China with no word on other manufacturing locations.  This follows Daimler's strategy on SMART to make it an all EV brand and build it in China for Chinese consumption. 

      View full article
  • Posts

  • Social Stream

  • Who's Online (See full list)

    There are no registered users currently online

  • My Clubs

About us

CheersandGears.com - Founded 2001

We ♥ Cars

Get in touch

Follow us

Recent tweets

facebook

×
×
  • Create New...