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  • Drew Dowdell
    Drew Dowdell

    Quick Drive: 2019 Volkswagen Arteon SEL 4Motion

      ...is the successor to the CC up to the task?...

    2019 Volkswagen Arteon-2.jpgThe Volkswagen Arteon is the vehicle that effectively replaces the Volkswagen CC in VW’s lineup, however, it comes at the segment with a noticeably different approach. The Arteon is much more interesting looking than the old CC and comes as a hatchback rather than a sedan.

    I would hesitate to use the word “bold” about the Arteon’s looks, as feels rather conservative to me, but it still has a gravitas that lets passers-by know that this is not an ordinary Volkswagen. The front end has a lot of detailing with multiple creases in the hood and a deep, wide grille. Thick wheel arches give the car a muscular look. Around back, the hatch area fits between a set of thick thighs and a set of tail lights that almost look Benz-like. Down below there is a chrome strip that runs around the entire perimeter of the car.

     

    2019 Volkswagen Arteon-1.jpgAs handsome as the exterior is, the interior is a bit of a letdown. In the SEL version I drove, the interior materials were not up to snuff for a car with a $42,795 sticker price and the design is fairly sterile. There is a wide strip that traverses the dash and mimics the look of the grille and below that, another wood (plood?) strip runs parallel. The center stack is neatly organized with all knobs and buttons within easy reach.  If you are a bit of a neat freak like me about your car, keep a microfiber duster in the glovebox to wipe down the piano black surfaces.  The seats are flat and firm but without much lateral support. As a hatchback, rear passengers get cut out of a bit of headroom, but there is plenty of legroom back there for them to stretch out.  Cargo room for this size of a car can only be described as cavernous. The hatch lifts up high and out of the way giving you easy access to anything you can rear. Fold the rear seats down and you may even say “Crossover, what?”, there is 55 cubic feet of cargo room back there.

    2019 Volkswagen Arteon-4.jpgThe Arteon comes with an 8-inch touch screen display that includes Apple Car Play and Android Auto. Android Auto is easy to set up and I stayed in that mode during my entire drive.

    Driving the Arteon is probably the best part about it. My tester came equipped with 4motion, Volkswagen’s all-wheel-drive system. It works well and the car feels glued to the road during the twisties.  No matter which level of Arteon you buy, you have a single choice of engine. Standard is a 2.0 liter turbocharged 4-cylinder with 268 horsepower and 258 lb.-ft of torque connected to an 8-speed automatic transmission. It is this engine that delayed the Arteon’s entry into the U.S. due to a backlog of certification testing. This setup is merely adequate. It neither thrills you nor lets you down.  I do wish a V6 were available, but small-displacement turbo-4s are where the market is going these days.  Unfortunately, even with the small displacement 4-cylinder, you still get V6-like fuel economy.  The Arteon is rated for 20 city / 27 highway / 23 combined. For reference, that’s about the same as an AWD Buick Lacrosse with a big V6 and 310 horsepower, in fact, the Buick does a little better on the highway and so do most other V6 sedans. In normal mode the transmission is a bit lazy, upshifting early and reluctant to downshift. In sport mode, it wakes up a little but there is still a lag when downshifting.

    The ride and drive of the Arteon is definitely dialed towards comfort over sport. It comes equipped with a DCC adaptive ride system, but I notice almost no difference between the Sport and Comfort modes. Cruising along in the Arteon is serene with very little noise from the outside entering the cabin. It is certainly a car that can get you into trouble with the leasing company for mileage.

    Is the Arteon a car I can recommend?  Yes and no.  If you’re a die-hard VW fan, then the Arteon is an easy choice to make. Otherwise, there are more powerful and more upscale options out there for the price, but you wouldn’t be wrong to choose this one.

    Year: 2019
    Make: Volkswagen
    Model: Arteon
    Trim: SEL w/4Motion
    Engine: 2.0L DOHC Turbocharged Direct Injected 4-cylinder
    Driveline: 8-Speed automatic with all-wheel-drive
    Horsepower: 268
    Torque @ RPM: 258 @ 0 - 3,600
    Curb Weight: 3,655 lbs
    Location of Manufacture: Emden, Germany
    Base Price: $35,845
    As Tested Price: $42,790 (Includes $995.00 Destination Charge)



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    I was waiting for the Arteon for years and went to the press unveiling. It's such a handsome car but doesn't feel special enough. I also think VW needs to make a more powerful version that can be a cheaper S5 Sportback. 

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    8 minutes ago, Anthony Fongaro said:

    I was waiting for the Arteon for years and went to the press unveiling. It's such a handsome car but doesn't feel special enough. I also think VW needs to make a more powerful version that can be a cheaper S5 Sportback. 

    Definitely needs a more powerful version. If a Lacross AWD and 300 AWD can get the same fuel economy with much more power, then there is no reason the Arteon couldn't do it with a V6 as well. 

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    External is not bad looking but I have to say HELL NO to them getting a pass on this sterile black Blah interior. This is as bad as all the bloody black interior blah dashes GM and Ford is building.

    Where is the PASSION for the interior, customer comfort and what should be a relaxing ride. :facepalm:

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    Looking at the VW site, the interior color choices are very limited...all very bland and muted..even the black and brown comes off boring.  Needs brighter interiors. 

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    5 hours ago, Anthony Fongaro said:

    I was waiting for the Arteon for years and went to the press unveiling. It's such a handsome car but doesn't feel special enough. I also think VW needs to make a more powerful version that can be a cheaper S5 Sportback. 

    They'll probably depreciate hard and you can get a CPO one for a song.

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    The main problem with the Arteon is an Audi A4 2.0T Premium is $42,000.  

    The secondary problem is the Kia Stinger is cheaper, the new Hyundai Sonata is a looker inside and out and much cheaper.

    This car just has a horrible value quotient.

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    3 hours ago, Drew Dowdell said:

    They'll probably depreciate hard and you can get a CPO one for a song.

    Don’t think so. VW’s hold their value well. I recently purchased an Arteon SEL Premium R-Line and I must say that it is a phenomenal car. Test drove Stinger and G70 both with V6 engine and yes they are more powerful but I purchased the VW because it was more of a “complete” car. Ride is sublime. Interior, like a lot of VW’s is very well put together (although the color choices could be more). It will age well. When I drive it, people stop dead in their tracks and point and the stares are endless. VW handcuffs the Arteon because they don’t want to step on Audi’s toes (whatevuh, that’s one reason why Audi can charge such stupid prices and get away with it.) Car has dynamic styling unlike any Audi Sportback.  Would I have loved a TT VR6? YES!! But the Turbo 4 makes the car hustle with supreme confidence and quiet class. Before you make final judgment readers....try one. 

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      Source: Volkswagen
      Press Release is on Page 2


      2021 Volkswagen Arteon world premiere

      Jun 23, 2020
      Brand halo is updated inside and out—a new front end impresses with sharpened design elements and available illuminated grille, while inside, a new cockpit offers greater levels of refinement Digital Cockpit standard across lineup European offering includes new Arteon Shooting Brake, as well as plug-in hybrid (160 kW / 218 PS) and Volkswagen R-developed performance (235 kW / 320 PS) powertrains Herndon, VA — The Arteon is Volkswagen’s Gran Turismo—marrying the sleek design of a premium coupe to the space of a midsize sedan. For 2021, Volkswagen is introducing an extensive product line update to the brand halo, including sharpened design elements, interior refinements, and intelligent comfort systems. In Europe, Volkswagen is enhancing the product line with a second version—the new Arteon Shooting Brake—alongside new powertrain options including a plug-in hybrid drivetrain generating 160 kW (218 PS) and Arteon R versions with 235 kW (320 PS).
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      The Arteon is equipped with the Volkswagen Digital Cockpit, which allows the driver to configure the instrument display. The graphics of the 10.25-inch display are clear and of a high quality. The driver can quickly and easily switch between three basic layouts using a View button on the multifunction steering wheel.
      Arteon adopts the all-new MIB3 infotainment system, integrated in a clearly visible and easy-to-reach position above the new air-conditioning controls. All models come standard with the 8.0-inch Discover Media system with navigation. MIB3 offers natural voice control, multi-phone pairing that can easily switch between devices, and wireless App-Connect. Wireless charging is also new for 2021.
      Volkswagen is also offering a newly developed, high-end sound system made by audio specialists harman/kardon for the very first time. It has been specifically geared towards the Arteon product line. The system uses a 700-watt, 16-channel Ethernet amplifier to power a total of twelve high-performance loudspeakers. One loudspeaker acts as the center speaker in the newly designed dash panel while another operates as a subwoofer in the trunk. The remaining treble, mid-range, and bass loudspeakers have been arranged in the doors. The infotainment system coordinates the individual sound control of the harman/kardon sound system which also provides pre-configured settings, such as Pure, Chill out, Live and Energy.
      Powertrain
      The Arteon is powered by a 2.0-liter turbocharged and direct-injection TSI® engine, making 268 horsepower and 258 pound-feet of torque. The power is taken to the front wheels via a standard eight-speed automatic transmission with Tiptronic® shifting; 4Motion all-wheel drive is available on SEL R-Line models and standard on SEL Premium R-Line models.
  • Posts

    • Personally, I am amazed that the Continental was not based on a stretch Mustang platform instead of the one it used.  We could use a few more RWD cars, not fewer.  But it is what it is.
    • You can't fit comfy in anything though so that's a moot point.  You'd complain about the rear seat space in an S-Class or a Range Rover..but not a CT6. 🤔 If they were doing everything to cut corners, it wouldn't have been the first Lincoln to have its own switchgear and engines not used from a Ford. "The expansive rear seat provides plenty of room for passengers to stretch out, and options such as our test car’s $4300 Rear-Seat package make for a sybaritic experience back there, with heating, cooling, power-adjustable lumbar support, and powered recliners for the occupants. " - You're just massive "All of the cabin's touch points are high-quality; Lincoln has created its own switchgear for the Continental (and eventually the rest of the Lincoln line) with knurled-metal control knobs on the steering wheel and A/C system, and unique turn-signal stalks. Just about the only Ford-style switchgear I could find in the cabin were the window switches on the doors, and the overhead storage binnacle mounted just forward of the optional panoramic moonroof. "
    • A world of ENDLESS payments for minuscule differences. Poor financial strategy.
    • So sorry that happened to your van. 
    • First off ROOM inside. I could not sit comfy in the front and have anyone sit behind me. Even if a short person was upfront, I could not sit comfy in back but had to slouch due to no head room with a bunker sucking window view out. The car had style, but everything they could to cut corners they did including not making it a roomy true to life RWD Big Car that big people could sit in. Failure from the get go by Ford. Hard plastics on what was supposed to be the relaunch of luxury. Anything but that. So if you wanted to compare it, was a Ford version of a Kia.
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