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  • William Maley
    William Maley

    Review: 2018 Hyundai Accent SE vs. Kia Rio EX

      Dueling Subcompact Sedans

    I found myself in a bit of quandary when it came to writing the review for the 2018 Hyundai Accent and Kia Rio. Both of these models have been redesigned recently and despite the different exteriors, under the skin they share a number of key parts such as the engine and suspension. As I was going through my notes, I realized the answer was right in front of me; talk about the differences between the two and see which one does it better. 

    Exterior

    Between the two vehicles, the Rio stands out considerably. Like the previous model, the new Rio has a fair amount of European influence with neatly proportioned body and clean lines. The front end is quite low and features a narrow top grille and deep slits in the bumper for a set of fog lights. 15-inch alloy wheels come standard on EX. Unlike the Accent, the Rio is still available in as a hatchback.

    The Accent goes for the safe approach with a simple three-box sedan design. This isn’t helped by the silver color on my test vehicle which makes it become somewhat anonymous. The only real design traits are in the front with a new grille shape that is appearing on new Hyundai models and cutouts in the bumper for accent trim on our base SE tester or foglights on higher trims. One way the Accent SE stands out from the Rio LX is painted door handles and mirror caps.

    Interior

    There are no frills to be found in the Accent’s interior. Like the outside, Hyundai went for a simple and honest design. Material quality is what you expect in the class - hard plastics on most surfaces. But the plastics have a solid feel. All Accents feature basic front seat adjustments - fore/aft, height (driver only), and recline. I was able to find a position that worked for me quite quickly. One item to be aware of is the SE doesn’t come with a telescoping adjustment for the steering wheel; SEL models and above get that feature. Space in the back is average for the class with a decent amount of headroom, but a limited amount of legroom.

    Kia added some style to the Rio’s interior with a sculpted dash featuring two-tone plastics. Hard plastics make up the majority of interior surfaces with a grain texture pattern. Like the Accent, the plastics have a very solid feel. The layout is simple with most controls in easy reach. Finding a comfortable position took no time with a basic set of seat adjustments and a tilt/telescoping steering wheel. However, I found the seats in the Rio to not be as supportive on long trips. The back seat mirrors the Accent; ok headroom and a small amount of legroom.

    Infotainment

    The Rio EX comes with a 7-inch infotainment system with Kia’s UVO infotainment system. No navigation system is offered, but you won’t need it as support for Android Auto and Apple CarPlay is standard. It will not take long to familiarize yourself with UVO thanks to a well-thought out interface and dedicated buttons for various features. Performance is impressive with the system responding very quickly to inputs.

    Over at the Accent SE, it comes with a 5-inch touchscreen radio. For the most part, the system was simple to use with redundant buttons for various functions, simple interface, and large touchscreen buttons. I only wished that the screen was slightly larger when I was scrolling through my iPod. One surprise was the SE getting Bluetooth as standard. Kia doesn’t offer Bluetooth on the base Rio LX.

    Powertrain

    Both the Accent and Rio use the same 1.6L inline-four engine producing 130 horsepower and 119 pound-feet of torque. What differs between the two is the transmission; the Accent SE comes with a six-speed manual while the Rio EX makes do with a six-speed automatic. Between the two, the Accent is noticeably quicker. The manual transmission allows the engine to flex what little muscle it has to get the vehicle up to speed. In the Rio, the automatic’s programming smothers the small amount of power to improve fuel economy. There is a Sport mode that holds onto gears longer, but it doesn’t make much of a difference. Neither of the transmissions can help the 1.6L on the freeway as the engine struggles to get up to speed at a decent rate.

    Fuel Economy

    EPA fuel economy figures are almost identical for the two models. Both return 28 mpg in the city and 37 on the highway. The difference is in the combined figure; the Rio returns 32, while the Accent returns 31. I got an average of 34 in the Rio and 33 in the Accent.

    Ride and Handling

    There are more similarities between the Rio and Accent when it comes to the driving experience. Both still employ struts in the front and a torsion-beam rear axle. But the body has been stiffened which helps with ride quality. Both models exhibited excellent isolation of most road imperfections. Handling is another place where the two surprised me. While not exhibiting the sporty characteristics of a Ford Fiesta, both the Accent and Rio show little body roll and feel quite nimble. The steering is light, but provides a decent amount of feedback when pushed. 

    Pricing

    The 2018 Hyundai Accent begins at $14,995 for the base SE with manual transmission and climbs to $18,895 for the Limited. Our test SE with optional floor mats came to an as-tested price of $16,005. While it does cost $1,095 more than the base Rio LX, the Accent SE comes with more features such as Bluetooth, full power accessories, and a rear USB port.

    The 2018 Kia Rio kicks off at $13,900 for the LX sedan and climbs to $18,700 for the EX hatchback. The EX sedan tester came to an as-tested price of $19,425 with carpeted floor mats and destination. It is a bit hard to stomach the price tag when you can into some decently equipped compact sedans such as the Hyundai Elantra and Chevrolet Cruze for similar money. Even after you factor in the EX getting forward collision warning and automatic emergency braking, it’s still a tough sell.

    Verdict

    Trying to decide which of the two subcompacts was the winner in this piece was very difficult as they share so much. Beginning with the Rio EX, it is a very sharp looking subcompact with a fair amount of European influence and it is available as a hatchback. But the automatic transmission suffocates what little performance is on offer from the 1.6L engine. Plus the price tag of the EX is very difficult to swallow when you can step up into a compact for similar money. If it was the midlevel S, this would have been a closer fight.

    This brings us to the Accent SE. It's styling inside and out is a bit plain when pitted against the Rio. The lack of hatchback also makes the Accent a bit of hard sell to some buyers. But the list of standard features on the base model is very surprising. Plus, the manual transmission allows the engine to have some flexibility in most driving situations. 

    Both models are towards the top in the subcompact class. But in this comparison, the base Accent SE nips the top-line Rio EX by a hair.

    Disclaimer: Hyundai and Kia Provided the Vehicles, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas

    Year: 2018
    Make: Hyundai
    Model: Accent
    Trim: SE
    Engine: 1.6L DOHC 16-valve GDI Inline-Four
    Driveline: Six-Speed Manual, Front-wheel Drive
    Horsepower @ RPM: 130 @ 6,300
    Torque @ RPM: 119 @ 4,850
    Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 28/37/31
    Curb Weight: 2,502 lbs
    Location of Manufacture: Nuevo Leon, Mexico
    Base Price: $14,995
    As Tested Price: $16,005 (Includes $885.00 Destination Charge)

    Options:
    Carpeted Floor Mats: $125.00

    Year: 2018
    Make: Kia
    Model: Rio
    Trim: EX
    Engine: 1.6L 16-valve GDI Inline-Four
    Driveline: Six-Speed Automatic, Front-Wheel Drive
    Horsepower @ RPM: 130 @ 6,300
    Torque @ RPM: 119 @ 4,850
    Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 28/37/32
    Curb Weight: 2,714 lbs
    Location of Manufacture: Pesqueria, NL, Mexico
    Base Price: $18,400
    As Tested Price: $19,425 (Includes $895.00 Destination Charge)

    Options:
    Carpeted Floor Mats - $130.00

    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    Nice write up and interesting to see the contrasts between the two. Sadly, with todays CPO auto's, one could get a nicer auto for that money forgoing the new and depreciation hit and ending up with a nicer ALMOST NEW car in the next class or two above.

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    I wrote a review or two of the last Accent based on rentals and find the 2018 more attractive and a step up.  The IP and the exterior refresh show that, to some degree.  Here, we get to see the written results of a test drive, which I haven't yet taken.  (A visit to a nearby Hyundai dealership proved to be too melodramatic and "redundant"  - my T.O. thread.)

    At any rate, I'm glad to hear what you have to say under ride and handling ... that the steering is light yet the road feel is still good.  That's what I experienced in the 2017.  Hopefully, it's even a tad better.  Also, the sedan part doesn't bother me.  That's exactly the model I'd want.  I prefer the traditional shape.  I think the Accent is a competent little car and one seriously worth considering unless stepping up one category into something like a Cruze, for example.

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    I can't even do this ratio off of the number 10, so I'll use 20.

    If you go onto a Hyundai lot, you'll see approximately the following ratio of Sonatas : Elantras : Accents - 11 : 7.5 : 1.5

    They have boatloads of Sonatas.  Evidently, people are seeing them as good values and are scooping them up.  On the other hand, with the restyling and slight enlargement of the Accent, the line between the Elantra and it has gotten finer.  In short, one has to really scour a Hyundai dealership lot to spot an Accent.  That's what I have experienced.

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    I'd really like to get one of these (the Hyundai) if and when I rent an economy car next.  I was looking at on-line dealer inventories.  They are few and far between, relative to other Hyundai models.  Some, however, show up and are marked "in transit."

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