Flybrian

GM designing new 1.4/1.6l engine family

10 posts in this topic

GM Developing Small Engine in Korea, China
New motor partners with Daewoo, Suzuki
Posted Image
By ALYSHA WEBB | Link to Original Article @ AutoWeek | Published 06/26/07, 12:03 pm et


SHANGHAI -- General Motors is developing an engine in Korea and China that may be used globally to replace GM's 1.6-liter engine, say supplier and other sources.

The engine is being developed jointly at GM Daewoo Auto & Technology, which is a GM subsidiary in Korea; and the Pan Asia Technical Automotive Center Co. in Shanghai. It will be available in 1.4- and 1.6-liter versions.

GM Daewoo said it will not comment on future programs.

The new engine would be useful in the United States, where GM does not have any engines under 1.6 liters, says a consultant familiar with the project. As gasoline hovers at historically high prices in the United States, sales of small cars with efficient engines are rising.

GM's smallest engine in North America is a 1.6-liter inline four-cylinder in the Chevrolet Aveo, which is assembled by GM Daewoo.

The engine being developed in China and Korea is based on a GM Daewoo engine now being produced at Shanghai General Motors, GM's joint venture here. That engine is derived from a Suzuki design. Pan Asia Technical Automotive Center is owned jointly by GM and Shanghai Automotive Industry Corp.

Production of the new engine will start in 2009. Sources say it will be produced at a GM engine plant in Qingdao, in the northeast China province of Shandong.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

dual vvt, DI? claim that high HP with anything that helps. lol

maybe it'll actually get the aveo that 40mpg rating we all know it's capable of.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As long as they do not get recalled like all these other Chinese products lately.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What's built in China, can stay in China as far as I'm concerned.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What's built in China, can stay in China as far as I'm concerned.

Yeah. Too bad just about everything is built over there these days...I'd be very happy if I could point to everything I own and say "Not made in china".

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I realize that China has been a great success for GM. However, I am a very cautious person by nature and this whole adventure (China) makes me nervous.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of the biggest problems with the Cobalt is that it is an economy car which is not that economical compared to its competition -- that and the ergonomically silly high hip point of the seats which rubs my head on the headliner even at the lowest height adjustment unless I recline the seat backs considerably (I am a very average 5' 9" guy). Other than that, quietening is good, interior quality is good enough although not exactly VW standard and styling is OK.

GM said that it wants to not only meet but exceed the offerings of its competition. To do that (in an economy car) the 2.2 liter and 2.4 liter Ecotecs won't do. The 1.8 liter Ecotec in the Astra is more inline with this segment, but a 1.4 or 1.6 liter with the right technological content will help. The USA is a high-cost country. No deal with the UWA is going to change that. GM needs to learn to compete on quality, performance, reliability, technological superiority and (in time) brand perception. Trying to beat the Koreans or the Chinese on price will be futile.

I will like to see a technologically advanced 1.6 liter in the Cobalt and the Astra. By that I mean something with Direct Injection, 4-valves per cylinder, at least single (preferrably double) VVT, a harmonic balancer (rare on <2.0 liter I4s), chain drive for the camshafts, roller followers, valve deactivation (shuts off one of the two intake valves to increase swirl and induction velocity and dual stage intake plenum. This should make ~140hp @ 6600 rpm and ~120 lb-ft @ 4600 on regular 87 octane. In order to maximize the economy and performance of a relatively low torque engine, it should be mated to a 6-speed automatic gearbox (or at least a 5A which is the class standard today).

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now