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Paolino

Multilinguists... Ayudame! Aiutammi! Aidez-moi!

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Do you guys have a good deal of interference with knowing many languages?

I mean, I'm taking Spanish, it's my fourth language, and I'm just at wits end here... I'm spelling common words in English wrong and speaking Italian in class.

I mean, I'm doing the basics such as writing: quale, quando, che, when it should be cuale, cuando, que, etc.

I spelled photo on the scrabble board as foto.

I can NOT get the accent down in Spanish at all. Then I get frustrated and curse at the professor in Italian. Fortunately, he finds it funny.

Does it go away? I never had it this bad when I was learning French or Italian.

And the worst.. I though it'd be easiest to relate everything to Italian, but it seems Spanish is closer to Sicilian than it is to Italian.

Now I'm rambling.

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Well... I learned Armenian first (because I am), then Spanish (because I was born in Mexico) and finally English (because I moved to the US) by the age of 5. Living in the US forced me to primarily speak English, so I'm always slow to get into the mindset anytime I start speeking Armenian or Spanish (I'm even slow to speak Spanish until I get back into the mindset).

Anyway... Learning the languages so early basically negated any issues I have with accents, though others have told me I have a very slight "mutt" accent. But back in my Armenian HS, I often found myself mixing up the Spanish and Armenian. So yeah... it sucks, and I think it finally went away, but it could be because I speak less Armenian since graduating HS.

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I had that problem twice in my life. I learned Latin 1st, then Italian, no problem there. Then I learned Spanish and that's where my problems began, there is not much difference between otto and ocho, cuantos anos or quanti anni, then one day it just clicked but I learned Castilian Spanish, which is like speaking Spanish with a lisp. I then had problems speaking Castilian Spanish in South America, first they don't use Vosotros and the accents are way different such as in the word llama which I pronounced like yama, in South America the same word is pronounced like jama and in Puerto Rico they for some reason don't pronunce the rolling RRRRRs, they for some reason become silent R's. But this too became second nature once I lived in Mexico and Ecuador.

Good luck Paulie, I'm sure you will get it, it just takes a little time and then one day it will just click. For me I know I have a language down pat, once I dream in that language.

Edited by Pontiac Custom-S
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I had that problem twice in my life. I learned Latin 1st, then Italian, no problem there. Then I learned Spanish and that's where my problems began, there is not much difference between otto and ocho, cuantos anos or quanti anni, then one day it just clicked but I learned Castilian Spanish, which is like speaking Spanish with a lisp. I then had problems speaking Castilian Spanish in South America, first they don't use Vosotros and the accents are way different such as in the word llama which I pronounced like yama, in South America the same word is pronounced like jama and in Puerto Rico they for some reason don't pronunce the rolling RRRRRs, they for some reason become silent R's. But this too became second nature once I lived in Mexico and Ecuador.

Good luck Paulie, I'm sure you will get it, it just takes a little time and then one day it will just click. For me I know I have a language down pat, once I dream in that language.

See, that's just it.. 11 years ago I took 1 semester of Spanish and the teacher taught us Castilian... had NO problem pronouncing things. This professor wants us to speak with a Latin American accent, and therefore no lisp. I think I was better with the lisp, because it differentiated it more.

My other beef is that I'm taking this class with people who are fulfilling a requirement. I sit in the back of the room and twiddle my thumbs because 90% of the grammar is identical to Italian. The students were angry because I was the only one who had no problem with the imperfect and preterit, and I tried to explain to them the uses are identical in Italian. Uffa!

YJ, if there are any other "choice" words in Italian you care to know, let me know! LOL

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I have a very blunt American accent when I speak Spanish. Most of my trouble comes from words with the double-R--I sound like a blender when I try to say a word with a double-R. Reading and writing in Spanish are my strengths.

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YJ, if there are any other "choice" words in Italian you care to know, let me know! LOL

Don't be surprised if you get a PM out of the blue sometime, taking you up on your offer. :smilewide:

A choice word (or would it be a set?) I know in Italian and have down pat and ready for immediate use is "pezzo di merda." I don't think anyone needs to translate that. :P

What I do find interesting is how close the word "merda" is to it's French equivalent, which would be "merde" I think. (Well, I guess I know a dirty French word, too! :lol: )

Take all misspellings, etc., with a grain of salt. My foreign languages are pretty rusty. :)

Edited by YellowJacket894
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Don't be surprised if you get a PM out of the blue sometime, taking you up on your offer. :smilewide:

A choice word (or would it be a set?) I know in Italian and have down pat and ready for immediate use is "pezzo di merda." I don't think anyone needs to translate that. :P

What I do find interesting is how close the word "merda" is to it's French equivalent, which would be "merde" I think. (Well, I guess I know a dirty French word, too! :lol: )

Take all misspellings, etc., with a grain of salt. My foreign languages are pretty rusty. :)

No problem. Mierda in Spanish.
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No problem. Mierda in Spanish.

Thanks. :)

Again, I'm dumbstruck by how close a lot of words, ill-intent or not, only require an alternate spelling to become interchangeable for that language. It also reminds me of how close Italian and Spanish are (and I also think Portuguese is also very closely related to the two as well), but how each culture and the people who speak it can really make their similarities almost vanish.

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Thanks. :)

Again, I'm dumbstruck by how close a lot of words, ill-intent or not, only require an alternate spelling to become interchangeable for that language. It also reminds me of how close Italian and Spanish are (and I also think Portuguese is also very closely related to the two as well), but how each culture and the people who speak it can really make their similarities almost vanish.

That is because all these languages are children on the ancient Roman language of Latin, as is Romanian!

Edited by Pontiac Custom-S
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That is because all these languages are children on the ancient Roman language of Latin, as is Romanian!

Of course.

... Why didn't I think of that before. x_X

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That is because all these languages are children on the ancient Roman language of Latin, as is Romanian!

A truly boring language to learn...one year of Latin was enough to make me want to crawl under a rock.

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A truly boring language to learn...one year of Latin was enough to make me want to crawl under a rock.

Really, you do know that the majority of English words have Latin roots? Some words are actual Latin words such as exit, super, circus, recipe, agenda, ultimatum, versus, plus, minus, percent, the list goes on and on. You speak Latin every day, you just don't realize it. :smilewide:

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Really, you do know that the majority of English words have Latin roots? Some words are actual Latin words such as exit, super, circus, recipe, agenda, ultimatum, versus, plus, minus, percent, the list goes on and on. You speak Latin every day, you just don't realize it. :smilewide:

Oh yes, I know. Still, that didn't make it any more fun to decline 3rd declension nouns or conjugating 2nd conjugation -ere verbs in the passive voice.

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Oh yes, I know. Still, that didn't make it any more fun to decline 3rd declension nouns or conjugating 2nd conjugation -ere verbs in the passive voice.

When you were in English class, was it any more fun learning the rules of English? I know English wasn't much fun for me, in fact English is not even my 1st language, German is. :P

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Thanks. :)

Again, I'm dumbstruck by how close a lot of words, ill-intent or not, only require an alternate spelling to become interchangeable for that language. It also reminds me of how close Italian and Spanish are (and I also think Portuguese is also very closely related to the two as well), but how each culture and the people who speak it can really make their similarities almost vanish.

What boggles my mind is that some Italian dialects (such as Sicilian) are closer to Spanish than the book Italian (Fiorentino) is. God, even French has words closer to Spanish than Italian.

For example:

English / Italian / Spanish / French / Sicilian

to work / lavorare / trabajar / travailler / travagliare

window / finestra / ventana / finêtre / ventana

come here / vieni qui / vini acá / venez-vous ici / vini ca

to go / andare / ir / aller / ire

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What boggles my mind is that some Italian dialects (such as Sicilian) are closer to Spanish than the book Italian (Fiorentino) is. God, even French has words closer to Spanish than Italian.

For example:

English / Italian / Spanish / French / Sicilian

to work / lavorare / trabajar / travailler / travagliare

window / finestra / ventana / finêtre / ventana

come here / vieni qui / vini acá / venez-vous ici / vini ca

to go / andare / ir / aller / ire

You need a history class! :AH-HA_wink: Sicily was more or less a Spanish possession.

Check this link it will explain the history and then you will see why the language is similar.

http://www.bestofsicily.com/mag/art186.htm

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I can NOT get the accent down in Spanish at all. Then I get frustrated and curse at the professor in Italian. Fortunately, he finds it funny.

You have to stop relating them. It's a handicap. I did the same thing. This is corny but think of yourself in another body, walking around a street in Spain or in Latin America. Don't you have a large Hispanic representation on LI? About 1/3 of my friends in LA were from Spanish speaking families, so that helped.

I had NO problem with the Spanish accent...none. Reason: I learned it "clean," in college and from good profs.

As for Italian, one of the biggest disadvantages is having had to learn Sicilian prior to Italian. It has made me extremely self conscious (since I am in Northern Italy right now) in that I try not to let out a "meridionale" cadence. (Don't get me started) In fact, people here ask me where I'm from.

Instead, in Spain, they told me my Spanish was excellent. In fact, one person said "Usted habla un Espanol correcto...no es el Castellano." It appears that the non-lisped clean Latin American Spanish, as might be spoken in Colombia or Venezuela, is more of the standard than is the Castilian.

Edited by trinacriabob
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You need a history class! :AH-HA_wink: Sicily was more or less a Spanish possession.

Check this link it will explain the history and then you will see why the language is similar.

http://www.bestofsicily.com/mag/art186.htm

Dude, it was also a French/Norman possession for at least 200 years...that's probably why people in France immediately speak French to me (since I guess I look like them) but a Spaniard will hold off.

Case in point:

armoire in English - armadio in Italian - "a muarra" in Sicilian

Ventana in Sicilian? Seriously? It must a regional finessing of the dialect. On the eastern side of the island, we pronounced it "a fineshia."

Edited by trinacriabob
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It also reminds me of how close Italian and Spanish are (and I also think Portuguese is also very closely related to the two as well), but how each culture and the people who speak it can really make their similarities almost vanish.

Not so fast. Ouch. Italian and Spanish, IMHO, are extremely close. Portuguese is a stretch, not because of the words nor the grammatical structure. It is the pronounciation which is maddening.

Everything with an S is pronounced SH if in the middle or at the end of a word. How that ever surfaced is beyond me. :scratchchin:

For example, Lisboa is Leeshboa, the town of Cascais is Kash-kaish, and "as praias" (the beaches) is osh praiash. If that were removed and an S was pronounced like an S is in the other related languages, Portuguese would be a snap...or at least easier. Every Portuguese person tells me it is easier for them to learn Spanish than for a Spaniard to learn Portuguese.

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you all have me beat, except YJ and maybe DN. lol 2 years of french in HS and a semester of japanese (college) near 3 years ago, maybe.

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As for Italian, one of the biggest disadvantages is having had to learn Sicilian prior to Italian. It has made me extremely self conscious (since I am in Northern Italy right now) in that I try not to let out a "meridionale" cadence. (Don't get me started) In fact, people here ask me where I'm from.

The north/south thing will always be present. We've had fights with professors in class. He's a northerner, and I'm a Sicilian. Try getting a good grade with that!

Ventana in Sicilian? Seriously? It must a regional finessing of the dialect. On the eastern side of the island, we pronounced it "a fineshia."

Agrigento, kinda southwest on the island.

And Pontiac... don't need a history lesson on Sicily... it had SO MANY influences, it's really hard to pinpoint where anything came from. Evidence is going to the actual land and seeing the 50 different cultures all blended in one area.

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