Blake Noble

2008 Opel Meriva Concept Images Leak

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Official 2008 Opel Meriva Concept Images Leak
But, it's a mini-minivan thing, and who's gonna care next to the Coupe 60?
MerivOp_0.jpg
Link to Original Article @ Carscoop

The first official images of Opel’s forthcoming Meriva Concept made their way into various internet forums this morning giving us a full-blown view of the compact mnivan. The concept previews the next-generation Meriva and it features rear-hinged rear doors on both sides that open to a 90-degree angle. Weirdly enough –for a prototype that is, it retains the B-columns. As for the interior, the Meriva Concept’s cabin design looks like its two steps away from production.
Edited by YellowJacket894
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I think we should care this has a MUCH greater chance at production. I see some resemblance to the Opel Flexstream concept which is a nice surprise.

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Yes, I too see the Opel Flexstram in this concept, but I also see the Chevy Groove:

chevy-groove005.jpg

chevy-groove011.jpg

I can see Saturn getting the Opel version as-is and Chevy getting a rebodied version of it as the Groove (could it be an HHR replacement perhaps?).

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The Flextreme was a great looking concept, one of my recent favorites. I just love the flow and that everything works in concert. This Meriva is also good looking. [gotta show love for the Groove too!]

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OK, it can go back under embargo now.
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Yes, I too see the Opel Flexstram in this concept, but I also see the Chevy Groove:

chevy-groove005.jpg

chevy-groove011.jpg

I can see Saturn getting the Opel version as-is and Chevy getting a rebodied version of it as the Groove (could it be an HHR replacement perhaps?).

Too small. The Groove is about the size of an Aveo.

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Think of it as a smart fortwo stretched to make room for two extra doors and a rear seat.

Smart ForFour? :smilewide:

car_rt_photo_733111_1_7.jpg

(Well, the ForFour wasn't based on the ForTwo, but it and the Groove are somewhere around the same size, correct?)

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Smart ForFour? :smilewide:

car_rt_photo_733111_1_7.jpg

(Well, the ForFour wasn't based on the ForTwo, but it and the Groove are somewhere around the same size, correct?)

The ForFour shares its underpinnings with the Mitsubishi Colt, and both are superminis (B-segment) which makes them larger than the A-segment Groove concept.

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I wouldn't even call the Groove A-segment, as that is too large a space without subdivision (anything under about 3.8 m, overlapping with B which begins at 3.6 m). I would class it as the A0 segment.

A0: 3.2-3.6 m

A (strictly A1): 3.4-3.8 m

B:3.6-4.0 m

It's more usual to eliminate the overlap and say:

A0: 3.4-3.6 m cars like the 500, twingo and Panda. The Korean-market minicars were all restricted to less than 3.5 m in length, but that has been relaxed a bit, so the Groove would be wider and slightly longer—perhaps around 3.55 m long. The only 4-seat cars under 3.4 m are the Japanese Keijidosha, the Russian oka (hanging on by life support) and the licenceless (with 4-seats you need a motorcycle licence), speed-restricted voiturettes or quadricycles, so an A00-segment has not been necessary

A/B: 3.6-3.8 m (commonly just A-segment now)-cars like the Nissan Micra, Yaris hatchback, Suzuki Swift and Daihatsu Sirion. The forfour was about this size. Strictly the wider models are B-segment and the narrower A-segment, but in any one market at any one they are usually all the same class.

B/C: 3.8-4.0 m (commonly just B-segment now)-Fiesta, Polo, xD, Mazda2, Colt etc. Some new models like the Corsa and Accent are actually bigger than this (I am ignoring sedans which are usually about 200-400 mm longer).

Edited by thegriffon
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The Groove I would class as an A0-segment MPV

The Cube, Agila, 1007 and new bB (Daihatsu Materia) I would class as A-segment MPVs

The Meriva, A-Class, Cube Cubic, Fiat Idea, the old bB/xB and Hyundai Matrix etc. I would class as B-segment MPVs

The new Meriva concept is a 5-seat C-segment MPV, like the PT Cruiser, the new xB (Corolla Rumion), B-Class and Renault Scenic and Ford C-Max

3-row 7-seat C-segment SUVs are longer, and include the Zafira, Mazda5, Rondo, Grand Scenic and VW Touran, among others

Above that of course are the D-segment (VW Sharan, Odyssey, Espace, S-Max etc), E-segment (Grand Espace, swb Sedona etc) and fullsize minivans.

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I wouldn't even call the Groove A-segment, as that is too large a space without subdivision (anything under about 3.8 m, overlapping with B which begins at 3.6 m). I would class it as the A0 segment.

A0: 3.2-3.6 m

A (strictly A1): 3.4-3.8 m

B:3.6-4.0 m

It's more usual to eliminate the overlap and say:

A0: 3.4-3.6 m cars like the 500, twingo and Panda. The Korean-market minicars were all restricted to less than 3.5 m in length, but that has been relaxed a bit, so the Groove would be wider and slightly longer—perhaps around 3.55 m long. The only 4-seat cars under 3.4 m are the Japanese Keijidosha, the Russian oka (hanging on by life support) and the licenceless (with 4-seats you need a motorcycle licence), speed-restricted voiturettes or quadricycles, so an A00-segment has not been necessary

A/B: 3.6-3.8 m (commonly just A-segment now)-cars like the Nissan Micra, Yaris hatchback, Suzuki Swift and Daihatsu Sirion. The forfour was about this size. Strictly the wider models are B-segment and the narrower A-segment, but in any one market at any one they are usually all the same class.

B/C: 3.8-4.0 m (commonly just B-segment now)-Fiesta, Polo, xD, Mazda2, Colt etc. Some new models like the Corsa and Accent are actually bigger than this (I am ignoring sedans which are usually about 200-400 mm longer).

Segment classification is not based on overall length of the car, but usually on wheelbase and width instead. The segments have increased in wheelbase length over the past twenty years; the 1989 BE13 Fiesta had a longer wheelbase than the C-segment Escort of the time, for example, until the Escort was itself replaced in late 1990.

Despite being very slightly shorter in the segment, the Nissan Micra, Toyota Yaris and Suzuki Swift are all officially classed as superminis: in other words, B-segment. The city car (A-segment) vehicles from Toyota and Swift are the Aygo and Ignis respectively; Nissan however currently offers nothing in the A-segment in Europe.

Fiat's 500 and Panda are the same car underneath and both A-segment, as are the Renault Twingo and Ford Ka. The Mitsubishi Colt, Mazda 2, Ford Fiesta, Opel Corsa, VW Polo, Fiat Punto et al are indeed all B-segment superminis. The Smart ForFour used the same platform as the Mitsubishi Colt and was firmly a B-segment player, at least in Europe.

Should the Groove make it into production, then as with the Beat it'll be classed an A-segment car slotting below the Aveo in Chevrolet's European line-up.

There is no official "A0" segment.

Edited by aatbloke
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Wow...

Does GME even design cars anymore or do they just rip everything off from Mazda?

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Segment classification is not based on overall length of the car, but usually on wheelbase and width instead. The segments have increased in wheelbase length over the past twenty years; the 1989 BE13 Fiesta had a longer wheelbase than the C-segment Escort of the time, for example, until the Escort was itself replaced in late 1990.

Despite being very slightly shorter in the segment, the Nissan Micra, Toyota Yaris and Suzuki Swift are all officially classed as superminis: in other words, B-segment. The city car (A-segment) vehicles from Toyota and Swift are the Aygo and Ignis respectively; Nissan however currently offers nothing in the A-segment in Europe.

Fiat's 500 and Panda are the same car underneath and both A-segment, as are the Renault Twingo and Ford Ka. The Mitsubishi Colt, Mazda 2, Ford Fiesta, Opel Corsa, VW Polo, Fiat Punto et al are indeed all B-segment superminis. The Smart ForFour used the same platform as the Mitsubishi Colt and was firmly a B-segment player, at least in Europe.

Should the Groove make it into production, then as with the Beat it'll be classed an A-segment car slotting below the Aveo in Chevrolet's European line-up.

There is no official "A0" segment.

The Yaris, Micra and Swift are more than "slightly" smaller—Also the Ignis is the same size as the Swift and indeed was effectively replaced by the Swift in many markets. Suzuki's B-segment model was the Liana/Aerio. Yes, I know they tried to pass it off as a compact in the US by sticking in a bigger engine and jacking up the price, but who were they kidding? Even Suzuki aknowledges it uses the A-platform (Suzuki's term) of the Swift. Pricing and powertrains also group the Citroen C2, Ford Ka, Yaris, Micra and Swift in the segment below the Polo, Punto, Corsa et al. How the segments are defined depends on who you ask—Ford and VW have different ideas than other sources (VW's is purely platform based and has no relation to size at all—the Passat for example is a B-segment model and the Audi A6 in the C-segment). In the Chinese market the A0 segment relates to models under 4.0 m, the A to models under 4.5 m, the B to models over 4.5 m and 1.6 L (there is also a C-segment I have not seen a definition of but which may be vehicles over 2.5 L). The closest to an official definition of the size classes recognized by other European automakers was in a chart released by GM, which was strictly length (for sedans), not wheelbase based. I'd love to see something more comprehensive and with some official sanction (e.g. the ACEA).

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This is proof that Opel needs styling revolution-NOW!!!!! I mean, look at Citroen-I'm loving their designs, of their mid-size (D-segment, Mondeo-fighter) C5 I think it is-its low, not ugly. And the C-segment/compact C3 doesn't induce me to barf either, unlike some compact cars-they're daring, but not the worst. Ford has Kinetic Design, even if its mega-tame on Mondeo. What does Opel have? This pleasantly bland thing, the milked Insignia, and a bunch of vintage-2003-04 products, and the over-evolutionized, kind of ugly Corsa.

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The Yaris, Micra and Swift are more than "slightly" smaller—Also the Ignis is the same size as the Swift and indeed was effectively replaced by the Swift in many markets. Suzuki's B-segment model was the Liana/Aerio. Yes, I know they tried to pass it off as a compact in the US by sticking in a bigger engine and jacking up the price, but who were they kidding? Even Suzuki aknowledges it uses the A-platform (Suzuki's term) of the Swift. Pricing and powertrains also group the Citroen C2, Ford Ka, Yaris, Micra and Swift in the segment below the Polo, Punto, Corsa et al. How the segments are defined depends on who you ask—Ford and VW have different ideas than other sources (VW's is purely platform based and has no relation to size at all—the Passat for example is a B-segment model and the Audi A6 in the C-segment). In the Chinese market the A0 segment relates to models under 4.0 m, the A to models under 4.5 m, the B to models over 4.5 m and 1.6 L (there is also a C-segment I have not seen a definition of but which may be vehicles over 2.5 L). The closest to an official definition of the size classes recognized by other European automakers was in a chart released by GM, which was strictly length (for sedans), not wheelbase based. I'd love to see something more comprehensive and with some official sanction (e.g. the ACEA).

As I have said - I won't repeat myself again as I've worked in the European motor industry for 20-odd years - the segment classifications you're referring to are primarily the continental European generally accepted system, although NCAP uses a different system of grading, similar to that used in the UK which does also use the alphabetical segment classifications. Whiel manufacturers often use various size gradings for their platforms, ultimately when the vehicle is released to the press, the A-F generally accepted practice will be used. So a new VW Polo will be their B-segment market entry, for example. These segments have grown over the years, to the point where A-segment city cars are as large - and in some cases larger - than B-segment models where in the 1980's. The Yaris and Swift for example is just 100mm shorter than a Fiesta or Polo, but a whopping 400mm longer than the A-segment Aygo and Ka in both wheelbase and overall length. However, the VW Fox is almost as long as the Yaris, however it is not classed as a supermini and is a direct competitor to the Aygo instead by virtue of width, powertrains and pricing.

I apologise for the confusion, I was actually thinking of the Splash when I had typed Ignis. Yes, the Ignis is indeed roughly the size of the Swift with a similar wheelbase, but narrow, intended as a mini-crossover rather like the Daihatsu Terios. The Ignis did replace the Swift in many markets, but not Europe, which received its all-new market-specific Swift a couple of years ago.

Here's a brief summary of the classifications - which are wheelbase and width based - with the UK segment equivalent terminology as well as a number of manufacturer examples as they fit into the European system:

A-segment (city car) which includes smaller Japanese 'kei'-class/microcars:

Toyota Aygo, Ford Ka, Fiat 500/Panda (same platform), Suzuki Alto (microcar), & Splash, Peugeot 107, Citroen C1, Opel Agila, Renault Twingo, VW Fox, Smart ForTwo (microcar), Hyundai i10, Kia Picanto.

B-segment (supermini):

BMW Mini, Mazda 2, Nissan Micra, Toyota Yaris, Ford Fiesta, Fiat Punto & Linea, Suzuki Swift and Ignis, Peugeot 207, Citroen C2/C3/Pluriel (same platform), Opel Corsa, Renault Clio, VW Polo, Smart ForFour, Hyundai Getz, Mitsubishi Colt, Mercedes A-Class, Chevrolet Aveo, Audi A2 (now defunct), Kia Rio, Honda Jazz/Fit, Seat Ibiza, Skoda Fabia.

C-segment (small family car):

BMW 1-series, Mazda 3, Nissan Almera, Toyota Auris, Ford Focus, Fiat Bravo, Fiat Sedici (B/C segment), Suzuki SX4 (B/C segment), Peugeot 308, Citroen C4, Volvo S40, Opel Astra, Renault Megane, VW Golf/Jetta/Beetle (same platform), Hyundai i30, Mitsubishi Lancer, Mercedes B-Class, Chevrolet Lacetti, Audi A3, Kia cee'd, Honda Civic, Seat Leon/Altea/Toledo (same platform), Skoda Octavia.

D-segment (large family car/compact exec):

BMW 3-series, Mazda 6, Nissan Primera, Toyota Avensis, Ford Mondeo, Fiat Croma, Peugeot 407, Citroen C5, Volvo S60, Opel Vectra, Renault Laguna, VW Passat, Mercedes C-Class, Chevrolet Epica, Audi A4, Jaguar X Type, Cadillac BLS, Saab 9-3, Lexus IS, Honda Accord.

E-segment (medium exec):

BMW 5-series, Toyota Camry, Ford Scorpio (now defunct), Peugeot 607, Citroen C6, Volvo S80, Opel Signum (D/E segment), Hyundai Sonata (D/E segment), Mitsubishi Galant (D/E segment), Mercedes E-Class, Audi A6, Jaguar XF, Cadillac CTS, Kia Magentis (D/E segment), Lexus GS, Honda Inspire, Skoda Superb (D/E segment).

F-segment (large exec):

BMW 7-series, Toyota Crown, VW Phaeton, Mercedes S-Class, Audi A8, Jaguar XJ, Cadillac STS, Lexus LS, Honda Legend.

Wikipedia is often very accurate with cars within the generally accepted European classification system. It describes the Micra, Swift and Yaris as superminis which of course they are. In Europe, they are priced alongside other mainstream superminis and share similar engines.

Edited by aatbloke
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aatbloke, I have a question for you, what would be easier to do, to gain access to the UK coming from Switzerland and driving? Entering the UK with my EU German passport or my American passport. I have dual citizenship, but I'm thinking coming in with my EU German passport would be easier? What do you think? I'll be driving from Switzerland to Scotland.

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aatbloke, I have a question for you, what would be easier to do, to gain access to the UK coming from Switzerland and driving? Entering the UK with my EU German passport or my American passport. I have dual citizenship, but I'm thinking coming in with my EU German passport would be easier? What do you think? I'll be driving from Switzerland to Scotland.

EU passport lines are generally quicker, but it depends on the airport/seaport or other point of entry. At a seaport, the type of vehicle being driven can make a big difference too!

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EU passport lines are generally quicker, but it depends on the airport/seaport or other point of entry. At a seaport, the type of vehicle being driven can make a big difference too!

I will be driving a 2007 Pontiac Grand Prix GXP with EU German plates, coming though via the Chunnel.

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I will be driving a 2007 Pontiac Grand Prix GXP with EU German plates, coming though via the Chunnel.

Oh you'll be generally fine in a car. Commercial vehicles are often more closely examined.

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fullsize minivans.

That term is an oxymoron if ever there was one.

Why not just call them intermediate vans?

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