William Maley

Jeep News: 2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee Pricing Leaked?

9 posts in this topic

William Maley    391

By William Maley

Staff Writer - CheersandGears.com

January 26, 2013

The pricing of the 2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee has been leaked and made its way online. The folks at JeepGarage.org say they got their hands on the pricing and spec sheets. At a glance, we think the pricing could be the real deal.

Here is the pricing at a glance:

  • Laredo 4X2 – $28,795
  • Laredo 4X4 – $30,795
  • Laredo E 4X2 – $30,495
  • Laredo E 4X4 – $32,495
  • Limited 4X2 – $35,795
  • Limited 4X4 – $37,795
  • Overland 4X2 – $42,995
  • Overland 4X4 – $45,995
  • Summit 4X2 – $47,995
  • Summit 4X4 – $50,995
  • SRT 4X4 – $62,995

*Note: Pricing doesn't include a $795 destination charge

Now if you're wondering about the pricing for the 3.0L EcoDiesel V6, be prepared for sticker shock. The engine will cost $4,500 on the Limited, Overland, and Summit models. . We also don't know if you can get the diesel with 2WD since the pricing only deals with 4WD models.

Source: JeepGarage.org

William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.

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ocnblu    733

Makes me scared of a theoretical Colorado diesel.

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dfelt    1,769

Diesel is not for your 2-3 yr lease deals or casual buyer, but for those 5yrs and longer who want the Torque, Mileage and performance that a diesel can give a 4x4.

When you think of the price and mileage over 5yrs, this is a fair price. Yes I wish it was half that price, but then they are buying them from someone else.

GM hopefully can leverage their baby Duramax Diesel line around the world and bring it in at a reasonble 2000 to 2500 with high mileage.

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ocnblu    733

A question occurs then: how much have Europeans been paying extra for Jeep diesels in the past? I know just about every Jeep model, from Patriot to Wrangler to Cherokee to Grand Cherokee has been available with diesel power. I am under the assumption that Europeans prefer diesel, but how much are they required to pay over a gas model to tick that option box?

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A question occurs then: how much have Europeans been paying extra for Jeep diesels in the past? I know just about every Jeep model, from Patriot to Wrangler to Cherokee to Grand Cherokee has been available with diesel power. I am under the assumption that Europeans prefer diesel, but how much are they required to pay over a gas model to tick that option box?

It probably varies depending on the country, but in the UK the diesel is standard and the only available engine in the GC (except for the SRT) and Wrangler. A diesel is optional in the Compass there.

Edited by Cubical-aka-Moltar

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ocnblu    733

What does it do to the price then, relative to our base 3.6L GC and current exchange rates?

EDIT: well that just made me mad as heck, at the Jeep ® UK site, configurator, spec-ing out a diesel Compass that we cannot get. That would be soooo ideal in a Patriot here in America.

Edited by ocnblu

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What does it do to the price then, relative to our base 3.6L GC and current exchange rates?

EDIT: well that just made me mad as heck, at the Jeep ® UK site, configurator, spec-ing out a diesel Compass that we cannot get. That would be soooo ideal in a Patriot here in America.

Who knows? There is no correlation to pricing across markets. European Jeeps are built in Europe (at least they were in the DC era, in Austria, I believe?) w/ VM Motori Italian diesels.

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pow    106

It's still cheaper than all its competitors.

Grand Cherokee Limited 3.6: $37,595
Grand Cherokee Limited EcoDiesel: $42,095

difference = $4,500


Touareg V6 Sport: $43,945
Touareg TDI Sport: $47,445

difference = $3,500

Q7 TFSI Premium: $46,800
Q7 TDI Premium: $52,000

difference = $5,200

ML350: $47,270
ML350 BlueTEC: $51,270

difference = $4,000

Cayenne: $48,850
Cayenne Diesel: $55,750

difference = $6,900

X5 xDrive35i: $52,800 (w/ leather, convenience pkg, heated seats, power hatch, PDC)
X5 xDrive35d: $56,700 (standard equipment includes above options)

difference = $3,900

(None of the prices above include destination.)

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