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William Maley

Kia News: 2014 Kia Forte To Start At $16,700*

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By William Maley

Staff Writer - CheersandGears.com

March 21, 2013

Kia announced this week the pricing for the 2014 Forte which will start at $16,700 (includes a $800 destination charge).

That base price nets you a Forte LX with 1.8L four-cylinder engine with 148 horsepower. Standard equipment includes a six-speed manual, steering wheel mounted audio controls, Bluetooth, air conditioning, and power windows. An automatic version will cost $17,400* (doesn't include destination charge).

Stepping up to the $19,400 Forte EX nets you a 2.0L four-cylinder with direct injection making 173 horsepower. Standard equipment includes remote keyless entry, a rear camera, sliding center armrest, cooling glove box and the next-generation UVO telematics system.

Source: Kia

William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.comor you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.

Press Release is on Page 2


KIA MOTORS AMERICA ANNOUNCES PRICING FOR ALL-NEW 2014 FORTE SEDAN

Redesigned Compact Offers Lowest Base Price in the Segment at $15,9001

  • Forte’s European-influenced styling and premium amenities advance Kia’s value proposition to new levels of sophistication
  • All-new compact sedan is packed with cutting-edge technologies, including Kia’s next-generation UVO in-vehicle infotainment and telematics system with eServices to begin arriving in the next 30 days

IRVINe, Calif., Mar. 20, 2013 – Value has long been a hallmark of the Kia brand, and the all-new 2014 Forte sedan is no exception as it will carry the lowest starting MSRP in the compact segment at $15,900, plus $800 in destination charges. The lower, longer and wider Forte will offer a sportier and more upscale design, better performance, greater interior space and a wider array of premium amenities than its predecessor when it goes on sale within the next 30 days. Offered in LX and EX variants, the Forte will be propelled by either an efficient 1.8-liter 148-horsepower engine or a more powerful 2.0-liter 173-horsepower GDI unit. Fuel economy for the 2.0-liter powerplant is 24 miles per gallon city/36 highway/28 combined2.

“The all-new Forte offers our customers world-class design with plenty of refinement and an abundance of amenities, all at a tremendous value,” said Tom Loveless, executive vice president of sales, KMA. “With its sleek and sporty profile, two new powertrains and redesigned, driver-centric cockpit, the Forte is primed to become a standout in the very competitive compact segment.”

The 2014 Forte is offered in three models: LX with a 1.8-liter engine and manual transmission starting at $15,900; LX with a 1.8-liter engine and automatic transmission with a base price of $17,4001; and EX with a 2.0-liter GDI powerplant and automatic transmission beginning at $19,4001. The destination charge for all three models is an additional $800.

As the star of Kia’s popular “Hot Bots” Super Bowl ad this year, the all-new Forte represents one of the best small car technology values on the road. Slotted between the Rio sub-compact sedan and the best-selling Optima mid-size sedan, the all-new Forte arrives with class-up amenities and an all new chassis.

Unexpected Premium Features

Offered in LX and EX trim levels, the all-new Forte proudly carries on Kia’s reputation for offering premium features that redefine automotive segments. The base LX model comes standard with steering wheel-mounted audio controls, SiriusXM™ Satellite Radio3, Bluetooth® wireless technology4, power windows, air conditioning and heated power-folding mirrors among the many features that make the Forte stand out from its competition. The optional Popular Package (LX A/T only) adds 16-inch alloy wheels, cruise control, keyless entry with remote trunk release and a sliding front armrest.

Stepping up to the EX trim brings a more robust 2.0-liter GDI engine with Sportmatic® shifting and broadens Forte’s appeal with additional comfort and convenience features. Kia’s next-generation UVO in-vehicle infotainment and telematics system with eServices is standard and can now be integrated with an optional navigation system. Additional standard EX features include remote keyless entry with trunk opener, Rear Camera Display5, a sliding center armrest and a cooling glove box. The new optional FlexSteer™ system allows the driver to choose between three distinct steering profiles: Comfort, Normal and Sport. Features found on the optional Premium Package include heated front and rear seats, a 10-way power adjustable driver’s seat with class-exclusive air-cooled ventilation, leather seat trim, power sunroof, 17-inch alloy wheels and push button start with Smart Key and a heated steering wheel. Opting for the Technology Package, adds HID headlights, LED tail lights, a 4.2-inch color LCD cluster screen and dual-zone automatic temperature control with rear center ventilation.


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Pricing has me impressed as it is a great starter car pricing and featured.

What disappoints me is the gas mileage for this type of car. Poor Fuel Efficient engines.

Also what is the torque as you can have all the horsepower in the world, but when you do not have the torque to move your ass then you either become an accident or worse.

Not impressed with high HP engines and little bit of Torque and then having a 4 banger that gets no better gas mileage than a bullet proof american V8. There is something truly wrong with this picture.

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I disliked the Forte EX so much............I bought it, and not the Cruze.

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And now I bought a KIA Forte5 because GM makes nothing I want.

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Gm builds decent small cars, but I am with you, other people's product is better in the small car lineup.

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I agree that the Mazda3 is the best car in this class, but it costs a couple thousand dollars more than equivalent competitors.  The Forte can also get expensive when it's loaded up, but with a judicious choice of options, it can be quite a value.

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      Make: Kia
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      Source: Hyundai


      Hyundai Announces Pricing for All-New 2019 Santa Fe
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      Drivetrain
      MSRP*
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      $25,500
      SE 2.4
      All-Wheel Drive
      $27,200
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      Front-Wheel Drive
      $27,600
      SEL 2.4
      All-Wheel Drive
      $29,300
      SEL Plus 2.4
      Front-Wheel Drive
      $29,800
      SEL Plus 2.4
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      $31,500
      Limited 2.4
      Front-Wheel Drive
      $32,600
      Limited 2.4
      All-Wheel Drive
      $34,300
      Ultimate 2.4
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      $35,450
      Ultimate 2.4
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      $37,150
      Limited 2.0T
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      $34,200
      Limited 2.0T
      All-Wheel Drive
      $35,900
      Ultimate 2.0T
      Front-Wheel Drive
      $37,100
      Ultimate 2.0T
      All-Wheel Drive
      $38,800
      *Freight charges for the 2019 model year Santa Fe are $980. Pricing in this release does not include freight.

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