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The term black sheep is used to describe someone that is either odd or despicable, especially in terms of a family. Take into consideration Volkswagen. The past 15 years or so have seen a number of black sheep in their lineup. The best example is the Phaeton. Introduced in 2004 as competitor to the Mercedes-Benz S-Class and its ilk, the Phaeton was over-engineered and came with impressive luxury features. The problem was convincing people that it was ok to spend $80,000+ on a Volkswagen and was pulled out a few years after its introduction. Then there is the CC. Arriving to the lineup in 2008, the CC was one of the first vehicles to capitalize on the four-door coupe trend. But the past few years have seen the CC fade into the Volkswagen lineup, with the likes of the Jetta and Golf in the spotlight. So why has the CC almost gone into obscurity? I spent a week in the 2015 CC Sport 2.0T to find out.

 

Walking around the CC, you can’t help but think this is possibly the best looking Volkswagen in quite a while. The basic shape hasn’t changed much since it first introduced. A low-slung front end flows into a side profile with a high beltline and sloping roofline. The back has a short deck and a clean looking trunklid with a large VW emblem which conceals the backup camera - the emblem opens up at an angle to reveal the camera. The only real items of change are up front where Volkswagen swapped the grille, air intake, and headlights to bring it more in line with the current lineup.

 


2015 Volkswagen CC Sport CC 11


Moving inside, the CC has the air of a luxury vehicle. Soft-touch plastic finished in black and faux aluminum trim give a premium feeling to the vehicle. Controls are within easy reach of the driver and passenger, and have a solid feel to them. The Sport is the base model in the CC lineup, but it doesn’t feel like it with the amount of standard equipment fitted to it. There is leatherette with power adjustments for the front seats, dual-zone climate control, heated seats, a five-inch touchscreen with navigation, Bluetooth, HID headlights, and automatic wipers. I do have to call out the five-inch touchscreen. If you have checked out any of my previous Volkswagen reviews, then you know I hate this system as the screen is too small to hit the touch points and the graphics look dated.

 

In the back, you’ll find a bench seat and not the two seat layout that the original CC came with. This was to make the CC somewhat more practical. Sitting in the back, I found legroom to be generous, while headroom was very much at a premium due to the sloping roofline. Also the high beltline does increase the feeling of being cramped.

 

See Page 2 for Powertrain and Handling Thoughts


 

Most CCs come equipped with Volkswagen’s venerable turbocharged 2.0L four-cylinder with 200 horsepower and 207 pound-feet of torque. Those wanting a bit more power will want to check out the top-of-the-line CC with the 3.6L VR6 producing 280 horsepower and 265 pound-feet of torque. The 2.0T comes with a choice of either a six-speed manual or DSG, while the VR6 gets a six-speed automatic only. In my case, I had the 2.0T paired with a six-speed manual, and was delighted by this combination. Despite the low power numbers, the 2.0T feels much more powerful. Power is instantaneous and never seem to fall off a cliff. Even in situations where I needed to make a pass, the 2.0T was there with the power needed to get me moving. The six-speed manual was smooth and provided positive shift action as I went through the gears. As for fuel economy, the CC 2.0T with the manual is rated at 22 City/31 Highway/25 Combined. I got an average of 27.2 MPG for the week.

 


2015 Volkswagen CC Sport CC 8


The CC’s ride was surprising in how it balanced comfort and sport. In day to day driving, the CC did an excellent job of isolating bumps and road imperfections. Out on the freeway, the CC kept road noise mostly at bay. Wind noise is somewhat apparent when cruising at high speed. On the curves, the CC is nicely balanced and likes to be pushed. Steering is on the lighter side, but provides decent feel.

 

The Volkswagen CC is still a credible vehicle in the Volkswagen lineup. With sharp looks, an impressive feature list, and a balanced diet of sport and comfort, the CC deserves more recognition. But why has the CC faded into the unknown? It comes down to CC being one of the oldest models in the lineup. It doesn’t help newer models such as the Golf are overshadowing it. But if you’re looking for something a bit different in the midsize/entry-level luxury sedan class, be sure to give the CC a close look.

 

Disclaimer: Volkswagen Provided the CC, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas

 

Year: 2015
Make: Volkswagen
Model: CC
Trim: Sport
Engine: 2.0L TSI Turbocharged 16-Valve Four-Cylinder
Driveline: Six-Speed Manual, Front-Wheel Drive
Horsepower @ RPM: 200 @ 5100
Torque @ RPM: 207 @ 1700
Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 21/32/25
Curb Weight: 3,358 lbs
Location of Manufacture: Emden, Germany
Base Price: $32,685
As Tested Price: $33,550 (Includes $865.00 Destination Charge)

 

Options:
N/A


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Passat is much more practical, and has much better back seat room.  Still a neat car though....

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The agree that the Passat would be a much more practical car, but for a small family I think the CC is perfect and very usable.

 

Is the CC a re-name of the Bora or Jetta?

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The agree that the Passat would be a much more practical car, but for a small family I think the CC is perfect and very usable.

 

Is the CC a re-name of the Bora or Jetta?

 

No. The CC is its own model. I don't know if Europe still calls it the Passat CC or not.

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The CC is a 4 door coupe in the same vein as the M-B CLS is and the Audi A7, on a smaller package.

The rear space is tight and if you are a tall person, you will have a hard time getting in the back as the roof line slopes real fast to provide that 4 door coupe silhouette. the first and second year of its production, the back seats were bucket style. In 2012 VW started offering bench seats for the back. And by reading the article...I am to understand that VW has deleted the bucket seat arrangement all together.

Mr. William finds the leg room to be sufficient...I on the other hand, when I was looking to buy a VW CC in 2012, I was not satisfied with the leg room. And I am 5'6" tall.

I really really LOVED the CC in 2012, I found it to be very well built, with premium levels of quality. I found the CC to be at a Premium car level. I also found the Buick Regal to be equally the same. All positives and negatives are the same between the Regal and CC.

I bought a 2012 Acura TL SH-AWD instead. Primarily because the back space is much much more in line as a family car. I find the CC to be a car for the single executive who does not want a BMW 3 Series coupe....or sedan and does not want to compromise with a 1 Series Bimmer either. The CC is/was a very nice alternative.

In my opinion, the CC is now long in the tooth. I am awaiting for its replacement.

This is what VW proposed not too long ago...and this is the reason why I thing the current CC is long in the tooth

volkswagen-sport-coupe-concept-gte-photo

 

05-vw-sport-coupe-gte-concept-geneva-1.j

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I really liked the CC when it was new. It was a great looking, clean design with just a hit of aggressiveness. The interior was also the best around. Now that it's aged and VW gave it a half-hearted refresh that included making the face completely forgettable, I don't look twice at them. At this point, I think the interior looks older than its age. The rest of the industry advanced too quickly while VW put all its focus into increasing volume of lesser models and let the CC stagnate.

 

This was a much better looking car.

Volkswagen-Passat-CC-2011-1.jpg

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really if you want space, the Passat is the way to go.  The sales numbers reflect how space and price are valued compared to the CC.

 

Not sure why but when i was selling cars, a guy i worked with had sold VW for awhile.  He said the CC's the customers complained about how bad they were in winter. Odd for a front driver.  I am guessing the tires OEM were an issue.  Could be why people never re-leased them for example.  On trades their trade in value did not come close to the residuals that were assigned to them either.  VW had buyout penalties on the leases if you tried to trade them in so you usually were stuck holding on to them til the very end.

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Mr. William finds the leg room to be sufficient...I on the other hand, when I was looking to buy a VW CC in 2012, I was not satisfied with the leg room. And I am 5'6" tall.

I really really LOVED the CC in 2012, I found it to be very well built, with premium levels of quality. I found the CC to be at a Premium car level. I also found the Buick Regal to be equally the same. All positives and negatives are the same between the Regal and CC.

I bought a 2012 Acura TL SH-AWD instead. Primarily because the back space is much much more in line as a family car. I find the CC to be a car for the single executive who does not want a BMW 3 Series coupe....or sedan and does not want to compromise with a 1 Series Bimmer either. The CC is/was a very nice alternative.

In my opinion, the CC is now long in the tooth. I am awaiting for its replacement.

This is what VW proposed not too long ago...and this is the reason why I thing the current CC is long in the tooth

volkswagen-sport-coupe-concept-gte-photo

 

05-vw-sport-coupe-gte-concept-geneva-1.j

 

Now that is odd, considering I'm slightly taller than you (5'8")

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^^^

Yup...it is odd...that is why I mentioned my oh sooooo great height that I have...

 

Also...if the salesman did his job properly that day, Id be driving a 2012 VW CC R-Line 2.0T as we speak instead of the Acura TL as I was hooked on the car.  (The 2013s were on their way in...actually, the CC that I test drove was his last 2012...it was a R-Line...and the 2013s were gonna be shipped later that week or so...) Except the idiot was harping on the fact that I have children and kept pushing the Passat on me...and I did not want the Passat...too stale...I WANTED the CC...I LUSTED after the CC...

 

Its hard for a salesman to "close" me as I KNOW what I want and I rarely get influenced by emotions when I buy a car...actually...I have to LUST over a car in order for me to buy it in the first place so that statement I made is not entirely correct...however, on that particular day I was test driving the CC, if he used his special magical salesman powers on me...he would have had a sale that day....for the CC...not the Passat...because like I said...if he took a notice how my emotions were on the CC, he would have seen a very vulnerably fellow...but alas...my better judgement finally won out and I resisted to buy...because he kept on pushing Passat...Anyway...I left for vacation with my family later that month and when we came back shortly thereafter...I test drove the Buick Regal and the Acura TL....the TL SH-AWD won out...

Edited by oldshurst442

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I really liked the CC when it was new. It was a great looking, clean design with just a hit of aggressiveness. The interior was also the best around. Now that it's aged and VW gave it a half-hearted refresh that included making the face completely forgettable, I don't look twice at them. At this point, I think the interior looks older than its age. The rest of the industry advanced too quickly while VW put all its focus into increasing volume of lesser models and let the CC stagnate.

 

This was a much better looking car.

Volkswagen-Passat-CC-2011-1.jpg

I drove a silver first gen DCT. Best sounding turbo four I've ever heard. It was a very nice car. Just couldn't afford vdub maintenance.

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      -pricing.  I think the average nature of this car would be easily forgiven if the pricing were in line with being an average car; not priced for a premium marque.  Like the LaCrosse and Envision, it is best to wait out the model year if you are buying and wait for the inevitable 7,000-10,000 or more in discounts...which might bring the pricing in line with what the vehicle really is.  You can't say this vehicle is appealing at the prices it is at now.  
      SUMMARY:
      This probably seems like a negative review, but you should consider it more of underwhelmed and let down.  This car as I drove it just doesn't have any kind of endearing personality to speak of!  At the end of the day, it took Buick two extra years to bring to the US it's own Malibu clone, which doesn't have much more to show for it.... apart from the clever hatch and base 2.0 engine upgrade over the 1.5.  I actually am very curious now to be among the first to try the 2019 Malibu 1.5t + CVT combo.  But that's an aside for another discussion.  The 2.0 that general motors puts in so many vehicles has never impressed me, and that's due more to it's character than anything.  I had hopes this would be the ONE CAR that it would feel sporting in; one that would make the car feel at least a little, like a SPORTS SEDAN.  Nope.  I will wait with baited breath to someday find a v6 GS to test, as i think it will be the only Regal worth anything.  At least worth anything more than just being another option in the midsize, genericar class.  And I hope Buick is working on a twin turbo six option as well for the GS (GSX?).  I tend to think this car won't move the needle in marketplace excitement until it has a tire shredder under the hood to brag about...The v6 will promise smoother revs and deeper lungs at least......... Still, as a replacement in the bottom end of the Buick lineup for the Verano, I am ok with this.  Just please, sex it up!
       
       
       
       
    • By William Maley
      Automakers have been bailing out of various auto shows for the past few years. Case in point, a number of German automakers pulling out of the Detroit show for 2019. Volkswagen is the latest one to announce that it will not be showing up to a major auto show.
      Reuters reports that the German automaker will be skipping this year's Paris Motor Show. 
      “The Volkswagen brand is continually reviewing its participation in international motor shows,” the company said in a statement. Instead, Volkswagen could host “various communications activities” in the city, including test drives.
      Volkswagen joins other automakers including Ford, Mazda, Nissan, Opel, and Volvo that are skipping Paris.
      Part of Volkswagen's decision comes down to cost-cutting due to the fallout of the diesel emission scandal. But the move is part of a larger trend of Automakers being more considerate of how they spend their marketing budgets. Declining numbers of attendees and competing shows such as CES in Las Vegas are the key reasons for this.
      Volkswagen's other divisions such as Audi, Seat, and Skoda will be appearing in Paris according to a spokesman for Volkswagen's French operations.
      Source: Reuters

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      Automakers have been bailing out of various auto shows for the past few years. Case in point, a number of German automakers pulling out of the Detroit show for 2019. Volkswagen is the latest one to announce that it will not be showing up to a major auto show.
      Reuters reports that the German automaker will be skipping this year's Paris Motor Show. 
      “The Volkswagen brand is continually reviewing its participation in international motor shows,” the company said in a statement. Instead, Volkswagen could host “various communications activities” in the city, including test drives.
      Volkswagen joins other automakers including Ford, Mazda, Nissan, Opel, and Volvo that are skipping Paris.
      Part of Volkswagen's decision comes down to cost-cutting due to the fallout of the diesel emission scandal. But the move is part of a larger trend of Automakers being more considerate of how they spend their marketing budgets. Declining numbers of attendees and competing shows such as CES in Las Vegas are the key reasons for this.
      Volkswagen's other divisions such as Audi, Seat, and Skoda will be appearing in Paris according to a spokesman for Volkswagen's French operations.
      Source: Reuters
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