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  • William Maley
    William Maley

    Geneva Motor Show: Chevrolet Corvette Stingray Convertible


    By William Maley

    Staff Writer - CheersandGears.com

    March 5, 2013

    Only a couple months after the new C7 Corvette Stingray made its debut at the Detroit Auto Show, Geneva was the place where Chevrolet introduced the new 2014 Corvette Stingray Convertible. The convertible marks the third introduction of a Corvette at the Geneva. The other two being the C6 Convertible and the monstrous C4 ZR1.

    The Corvette Stingray convertible shares many of design and performance cues as the coupe except for one. On the rear quarter panels , the Stingray convertible is missing the air intakes that are on the coupe. The reason? Well its due to the convertible top's mechanism being in the way. Engineers moved

    Another big change for the Corvette Stingray convertible deals with top. On the C6 convertible, you had the choice between a manual or power-operated top. On the C7, its power-operated only. The top can be raised or lowed up to 30 MPH. Plus, the top can be remotely operated by a button on the key fob.

    Power for the Corvette Stingray Convertible is the same 6.2L V8 producing 450 horsepower and 450 pound-feet of torque as in the coupe. Transmissions include a seven-speed manual or six-speed automatic.

    The new Corvette Stingray Convertible will be arriving three months after the Corvette Stingray goes on sale, so around late 2013.

    Source: Chevrolet

    William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.comor you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.

    Press Release is on Page 2


    Chevrolet Lifts Lid on 2014 Corvette Stingray Convertible

    2013-03-05

    GENEVA – Chevrolet revealed the 2014 Corvette Stingray convertible today at the Geneva Motor Show, featuring an all-new, fully electronic top that can be lowered remotely using the car’s key fob. The top can also be opened or closed on the go, at speeds of up to 30 mph (50 km/h).

    “The convertible has been a part of the heart and soul of Corvette since the very beginning in 1953,” said Ed Welburn, GM vice president of global design. “With the all-new Corvette Stingray, we designed and developed the coupe and convertible simultaneously. As a result, the Corvette Stingray offers an open-top driving experience with no compromise in performance, technology or design.”

    The Corvette Stingray coupe and convertible arrive in global markets in late 2013, with left-hand-drive models to be offered in Europe, the United Kingdom, the Middle East, Japan and Russia. Changes to Corvettes for export vary only in equipment required to accommodate a respective market’s regulations, such as lighting, headlamp washers and outside mirrors.

    “It's fitting to introduce the new Stingray convertible on the global stage at Geneva, because Corvette is the face of Chevrolet the world over,” said Susan Docherty, president and managing director of Chevrolet and Cadillac Europe. “It is an icon that has long been recognized and admired even in countries where it’s never officially been offered.”

    All of the performance technology and capabilities introduced on the Corvette Stingray coupe carry over to the convertible. The only structural changes are limited to accommodations for the folding top and repositioned safety belt mounts. Central to the Corvette Stingray’s driving experience is an all-new, more rigid aluminum frame structure, which is 57-percent stiffer and 99 pounds (45 kg) lighter than the current steel frame.

    All models are powered by the new LT1 6.2L V-8, with an estimated 450-hp (335 kW) and 450 lb-ft of torque (610 Nm). As no structural reinforcements are required for the convertible, both models share almost identical power-to-weight ratios.

    The LT1 combines several advanced technologies, including direct injection, Active Fuel Management and continuously variable valve timing to support an advanced combustion system designed to balance power and efficiency. The new Corvette Stingray is expected to improve upon the current model’s fuel economy of 13.6L/100km (EPA-estimated highway fuel economy of 26 mpg).

    With the top up, the Corvette Stingray convertible is designed for a refined driving experience. A thick, three-ply fabric top, along with sound-absorbing padding and a glass rear window, contributes to a quiet cabin and premium appearance.

    With the top down, the Corvette Stingray’s signature profile is further accentuated. Behind the seat backs, dual black accent panels enhance the character lines of the tonneau cover. Corvette Stingray’s signature “waterfall” design originates in the valley between the nacelles, bringing the exterior color into the interior.

    Additional highlights of the all-new Corvette Stingray coupe and convertible include:

    • A sculpted exterior with advanced high-intensity discharge and light-emitting diode lighting and racing-proven aerodynamics that balance low drag for efficiency and performance elements for improved stability and track capability
    • An interior that offers genuine carbon fiber and aluminum trim, hand-wrapped leather materials, dual eight-inch configurable driver/infotainment screens, and two new seat choices – each featuring a lightweight magnesium frame for exceptional support
    • Advanced driver technologies, including a five-position Drive Mode Selector that tailors 12 vehicle attributes to fit the driver’s environment and a new seven-speed manual transmission with Active Rev Matching that anticipates gear selections and matches engine speed for perfect shifts every time
    • Lightweight materials, including a carbon fiber hood on all models and a carbon fiber removable roof panel on coupes; composite fenders, doors and rear quarter panels; carbon-nano composite underbody panels and a new aluminum frame help shift weight rearward for an optimal 50/50 weight balance that supports a world-class power-to-weight ratio
    • Track-capable Z51 Performance Package, including an electronic limited-slip differential; dry-sump oiling system; integral brake, differential and transmission cooling; as well as a unique aero package that further improves high-speed stability.

    “We wanted the driving experience of the Corvette to live up to the performance expectations that come with the ‘Stingray’ name,” said Tadge Juechter, Corvette chief engineer. “Because it was designed from the beginning as an open-top car, the Corvette Stingray delivers an exhilarating, connected driving experience – no matter what configuration you choose.”

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    I still don't get why GM won't add rollover protection to its convertibles. Or rear seat center passenger headrests, for that matter.

    Crashes that would benefit from those safety features are rare, but when it does happen, it's still a life that could have been saved.

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    I still don't get why GM won't add rollover protection to its convertibles. Or rear seat center passenger headrests, for that matter.

    Crashes that would benefit from those safety features are rare, but when it does happen, it's still a life that could have been saved.

    Agreed on the rear center passenger headrests! :yes:

    Re rollover protection, maybe the windshield acts as the rollover protection arch? If rollover protection arches behind the seats were really necessary they would be there for sure!

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