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    LA Auto Show: 2017 Kia Sportage


    • We Can't Believe That's A Kia Either


    By now, you would think that we wouldn't be surprised when Kia rolls out a very stylish vehicle. You would be wrong as jaws dropped when Kia unveiled the 2017 Sportage at the LA Auto Show yesterday.

     

    Now Kia has shown off the Sportage at the Frankfurt Motor Show back in September. But if you missed or forgot about it, here is what you need to know. The Sportage's exterior is all new from the ground up with a more aggressive look. The front boast's Kia's most polarizing take on the Tiger nose with an upright design. Quad-beam foglights and new headlights finish the front. Size-wise, the 2017 Sportage is about 1.6 inches longer and rides on a wheelbase that is 1.2 inches longer.

     

    The increase in size allows for a more spacious cabin for passengers and cargo. A new dashboard layout provides an easy reach and understanding for all of the various controls. The 2017 Sportage will also be one of the first Kia models to debut the latest version of UVO, complete with Android Auto and Apple CarPlay integration.

     

    The base engine will be a 2.4L four with 181 horsepower and 175 pound-feet of torque, while a turbocharged 2.0L four with 241 horsepower and 260 pound-feet will be standard on top SX trim. A six-speed automatic comes standard on either engine, while there is a choice between front and all-wheel drive.

     

    Kia says the Sportage will arrive sometime next year.

     

    Source: Kia

     

     

    Press Release is on Page 2


     

    All-new 2017 Kia Sportage makes North American Debut at Los Angeles Auto Show

    • Fourth-Generation Sportage Compact CUV Boasts Sophisticated Design, a Refined Premium Interior and Significant Ride and Handling Improvements
    • Stiffer structure, new suspension, advanced driver assistance systems, and premium materials take Sportage to the head of the class
    • Cutting-edge design, engaging driving dynamics and intelligent packaging stand out in a staid compact CUV segment
    • First Kia to offer UVO3, featuring 14 telematics services, 8 GB of music storage, access to onscreen apps and Wi-Fi tethering capability, all free of charge


    Los Angeles, November 18, 2015 – Kia Motors America (KMA) today unveiled the all-new 2017 Sportage at the Los Angeles Auto Show. The fourth-generation Sportage, KMA’s longest-running nameplate, wraps stunning contemporary design around a structure that is both stiffer and more spacious than before. Advanced driver assistance technologies, significant suspension and steering improvements, and available intelligent AWD vastly improve the Sportage’s driving dynamics while premium materials and world-class craftsmanship create a class-up experience in an otherwise utilitarian segment.

     


    “Simply put, the Sportage is a breed apart in the compact CUV segment,” said Orth Hedrick, vice president, product planning KMA. “Instead of bland utility, the Sportage combines distinctly European and sporty styling with thoughtful design and functionality, including innovative packaging, premium materials, a turbocharged engine and surprising features. Sales of compact CUVs are on a sharply upward trajectory, and the all-new 2017 Sportage hits the sweet spot by providing an alternative for those seeking to express themselves with a vehicle that’s versatile enough to suit their unique lifestyle.”

     

    The all-new Sportage’s roomier, more luxurious cabin features an impressive level of craftsmanship, with high-quality, soft-touch materials and a range of technologies improving overall comfort, convenience, and connectivity. Updates to the drivetrain provide enhanced efficiency and performance, while changes to the suspension deliver better ride and handling. Like the outgoing model, the all-new Sportage will be built at Kia’s production facility in Gwangju, Korea, and be available in three distinct trim levels (LX, EX, SX Turbo) when it goes on sale next year. Pricing will be announced closer to the Sportage’s on-sale date.
    Aggressive, Inspired Design
    Designed under the direction of Kia’s president and chief design officer, Peter Schreyer, the 2017 Sportage’s exterior juxtaposes smooth curves with sharp creases. Although every body panel is new, the “face” of the new Sportage features the most significant change over the outgoing model. Kia’s hallmark “tiger-nose” grille resides vertically in the front fascia while the headlights are positioned higher, sweeping back along the outer edges of the sharply detailed hood. A lower, wider front clip – enlarged to provide greater engine cooling – adds visual volume to the lower half of the Sportage’s face, resulting in a planted and aggressive stance, though it keeps the same overall width, 73.0 inches, as its predecessor. The wheelbase has been stretched 1.2 inches (now 105.1 inches), while overall length has increased 1.6 inches to 176.4 inches.

     

    Despite its increased dimensions, the all-new Sportage remains instantly recognizable thanks to its sloping roofline and sharply raked rear window. Short overhangs and wheels pushed to the corners continue to be Sportage signatures, while a longer, more aerodynamic spoiler and bolder wheel arches give the compact CUV a more dynamic appearance. Tasteful chrome touches surround the windows, giving the Sportage LX and EX a more upscale look, while the top-of-the-line SX Turbo model adds more visual interest with new “ice cube” LED fog lamps, HID headlamps, LED tail lights, satin exterior trim, metal-look skid plates, and 19-inch alloy wheels.

     

    Modern and Refined Interior
    Inside, the new Sportage’s driver-oriented cockpit features a simple and modern design with clean horizontal lines emphasizing a more spacious interior. The lateral design of the dashboard divides it into two clear zones. The upper “display” zone delivers information to occupants via the instrument panel and new color touchscreen, which is canted 10 degrees toward the driver. The lower half, or the “control” zone, features easily identifiable switchgear to operate the available dual-zone climate system, audio and secondary controls. Similar to the touchscreen, the center console has been angled to face the driver.

     

    Giving the Sportage a more premium feel is the availability of either a single-tone (black) or two-tone (Dark and Light Grey or Black and Beige) cabin, while metalwork elements blended with soft-touch materials contribute to a more upscale interior. The EX and SX Turbo models add sumptuous leather upholstery, and the SX Turbo includes a D-shaped, heated and leather-wrapped steering wheel with paddle shifters, piano black trim along the center console, aluminum alloy pedals, and authentic stitching on the dashboard.

     

    As a result of the increased exterior dimensions and clever packaging, interior dimensions have grown, offering more space and comfort. Headroom has increased 0.2 inches to 39.3 inches in the front and 0.6 inches to 39.1 in the rear, while legroom has increased slightly in front and 0.3 inches in the rear to 38.2. The second row has a 1.6-inch lower interior floor (ground clearance is unchanged at 6.4 inches for front-drive models and 6.8 inches on AWD) and 1.2-inch lower rear bench hip point, benefitting second-row passengers with more headroom (up more than a half inch) and a more comfortable seating position. Offering even more comfort are options such as three-level front seat heaters, 10-way power control with lumbar support for the driver’s seat, and eight-way power control for the passenger seat.

     

    Just as passenger space has increased, so has cargo room. Thanks to an innovative dual-level cargo floor and a widened luggage area, cargo capacity behind the second row has grown substantially from 26.1 cu.-ft. to 30.7 cu.-ft. (SAE). By relocating the license plate from the bumper to the tailgate, the lift-over height has been lowered for easier loading and unloading. A Smart Power Liftgate™, which automatically opens when the key fob is within three feet of the vehicle, is also available.

     

    Outward visibility has been improved by mounting the side mirrors lower on the doors, using thinner A- and C-pillars and incorporating larger rear glass in hatch. This feeling of spaciousness is further enhanced with an available panoramic sunroof that is 4.1 inches longer than the outgoing model’s.

     

    Kia engineers reduced noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH) through the application of a quad-bushing setup in the rear suspension to isolate road noise and additional sound-absorbent materials throughout the Sportage’s wheel arches. Wind noise also is reduced as a result of thicker front side glass, a lip seal for the panoramic sunroof, and additional soundproofing in the doors. The 2017 Sportage is also more aerodynamic, with a coefficient of drag that’s been reduced from .37 cd to .35 cd.

     

    A Strong Foundation
    The structure of the all-new Sportage is significantly improved due to the extensive use of Advanced High Strength Steel (AHSS). With 51 percent of the Sportage’s body-in-white consisting of AHSS versus the outgoing model’s 18 percent, torsional rigidity has improved 39 percent. Furthermore, the increased use of advanced hot-stamped steel improves body integrity. The material has been used to reinforce the A-, B- and C-pillars, side sills, roof structure, and wheel arches. As a result of its stronger core, Sportage engineers are targeting the compact CUV to earn an overall five-star National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) rating and an Insurance Institute of Highway Safety (IIHS) Top Safety Pick+ designation.
    The 2017 will be available with a wide range of driver assistance features1 including:

    • Autonomous Emergency Braking (AEB), which can detect a potential collision with another vehicle or pedestrian and help bring the Sportage to a halt
    • Lane Departure Warning System (LDWS), which emits an audible alert when it detects the driver straying from the current lane without using a turn signal
    • Blind Spot Detection (BSD) with Lane Change Assist (LCA), which can monitor cars up to 230 feet behind the Sportage and provide the driver with a visual warning in the door mirror when another car enters the blind spot
    • Rear Cross Traffic Alert (RCTA), which can warn the driver when other cars pass behind the Sportage as it backs out of a parking space
    • Bi-HID headlights with Dynamic Bending Light (DBL) technology


    Refined and Spirited Performance
    The completely redesigned fully independent front suspension achieves a leap forward in ride quality. A four-point bushing setup delivers greater stability and a more natural response to changing road surfaces, while stiffer wheel bearings and bushings result in more precise handling. The fully-independent rear suspension now adopts a dual-member shock absorber housing, while both AWD and FWD models now benefit from a dual lower-arm multi-link setup. The SX Turbo has been uniquely tuned with firmer shock absorbers to deliver sharper handling befitting its athletic personality.

     


    The 2017 Sportage is offered in front or all-wheel-drive, both coupled with a six-speed Sportmatic transmission. The Dynamax intelligent AWD system is available on every trim and features a 50/50 locking center differential. The system senses, anticipates, and optimizes traction requirements for all road and weather conditions. AWD models feature a unique front fascia with a steeper approach angle for increased capability.

     

    Steering is another area of improvement, as engineers mounted the steering box farther forward on the axle for better weight distribution. With 25 percent less friction than the previous unit, the 2017 Sportage offers smoother and more precise steering inputs and better feel.

     

    Efficiency and driving performance were two major areas of focus when retuning the engines. The hard-charging 2.0-liter inline-four turbo found on the SX Turbo makes 241 horsepower and 260 lb.-ft. of torque and has been retuned to target improved fuel efficiency and offer better midrange torque. The LX and EX use a normally aspirated 2.4-liter engine that produces 181 horsepower and 175 lb.-ft. of torque and is also retuned to target better fuel efficiency.

     

    Advanced Telematics, Audio and Entertainment
    The all-new Sportage features a number of new and advanced on-board technologies2 to elevate the driving experience and keep drivers connected. The LX comes equipped with a standard 5.0-inch color touchscreen that features Bluetooth®3 hands-free phone operation and streaming audio, SiriusXM®4 satellite radio, and rear-camera display5. A move up to the EX brings a 7-inch capacitive touchscreen with the latest version of Kia’s award-winning telematics and infotainment system, UVO3, which is making its debut on the all-new Sportage. Complete with Android Auto6, Apple7 CarPlay® (late availability), and UVO eServices8 featuring 14 telematics services, the enhanced system features up to 8 GB of music storage, access to onscreen apps such as Pandora®9 and Soundhound and Wi-Fi tethering capability, all free of charge. The SX Turbo features all of the above, plus an 8-inch touchscreen and onboard navigation.

     

    All Sportages come standard with a 160-watt six-speaker audio system, and a powerful 320-watt Harmon Kardon® premium audio system is available, featuring eight speakers including subwoofer, an external amplifier, and Clari-FiTM10 music restoration technology for unrivalled audio quality.

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    Very interesting, the photo's from Frankfurt just did nothing for me. Yet these photos are much better and make it look very stylish indeed.

     

    Very nice for an entry level CUV.

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    I think this is the biggest danger to the Escape because I bet that Kia will price it aggressively

     

     

    Thinking that as well. Might just eat into their share as well...

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    Appears that the risk has paid off.  This thing looks cool!  AND IT COMES IN BROWN!

     

    I need to know when they are coming out with a car called "Pet".  Please advise.

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    Well, I were to buy this, I would immediately take the badge and put it in the centre of the grille instead of above it. On some cars the badge outside of grilles works, on some it doesn't as well.

     

    But I see some carryover styling. I don't know if that's enough. 

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    Ok so I saw this at the local auto show a few days ago and it is a good looking vehicle, probably would end up choosing between this and the CX5 in this segment or the VW Golf Sportwagen Alltrack for something a little different . The weak point as with all their vehicles is the Kia logo, they need to come up with something more interesting.

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      At least Honda got the Ridgeline’s bed right. Compared to the last model, Honda added four inches to the overall length of the bed (64 vs. 60 inches). This gives the Ridgeline the longest standard bed in the class. Unlike competitors, you cannot option a longer bed for the Ridgeline. Honda has also fitted some clever ideas for the Ridgeline’s bed. First is the in-bed trunk that offers 7.3 cubic feet of space where you can stow tools or luggage, giving the Ridgeline a significant edge in practicality than its competitors. Second is the dual-action tailgate which allows the tailgate to be opened downward or to the side.
      The recent crop of trucks have been stepping up their game when it comes to interiors and the Ridgeline is no different. The interior is borrowed from the Pilot crossover and brings forth an easy-to-understand control layout and high-quality materials. One item that wasn’t carried over from the Pilot was the push-button transmission selector. Instead, the Ridgeline sticks with a good-ole lever. Thank you, Honda.
      The Ridgeline proved to be a very comfortable pickup truck thanks to supportive leather seats, and power-adjustments for the driver. I took this truck to Northern Michigan and back during the holidays, and I never felt tired or had any soreness afterward. The back seat provides more than enough head and legroom for passengers. The bottom cushion of the back seat can also be folded up to provide a decent amount space for carrying larger items.
      Honda’s infotainment system in the Ridgeline has to be one of the most frustrating systems we have ever come across. The eight-inch system gets off on the wrong foot by using touch-sensitive controls for the volume and other functions that don’t always respond whenever pressed. At least you can use the steering wheel controls for a number of these functions. HondaLink needs a serious revamp in terms of its interface as trying to do simple things is very convoluted. For example, if I want to pick a podcast episode from my iPod, I have to jump through a number of menus to just to get to the listing of the specific show I want to listen to. You can avoid using HondaLink by plugging in your iPhone or Android phone and using CarPlay or Android Auto. 
      All Honda Ridgeline’s come with a 3.5L V6 producing 280 horsepower and 262 pound-feet of torque. This is paired up with a six-speed automatic. The base RT to the RTL-T has the choice of front or all-wheel drive. The RTL-E and Black Edition only come with all-wheel drive. No other V6 truck in the class can match the performance of the Ridgeline’s V6. Acceleration is strong whether you’re leaving a stoplight or making a pass. The run to 60 mph is said to take around 7 seconds, making this one quick midsize truck. The six-speed automatic delivers fast and smooth shifts.
      All-wheel drive Ridgelines like our tester come with Honda’s Intelligent Variable Torque Management system. This system quickly redistributes the amount of torque going to each wheel to improve handling and traction. AWD models also get the Intelligent Traction Management system which adjusts the settings of the powertrain to help you get through whatever terrain you find yourself in. We put these systems to the test by driving through an unplowed road with deep snow. The Ridgeline was able to make it through without breaking a sweat. That doesn’t make the Ridgeline a truck you want to take on an off-road trail as it only offers 7.9-inches of ground clearance and no low-range.
      The Ridgeline’s payload is towards the top the of class when compared with other midsize crew cab trucks. Front-wheel drive models can haul between 1,447 to 1,565 pounds in the bed. All-wheel drive models have a payload capacity of 1,499 to 1,584 pounds. For towing, the Ridgeline falls a bit short. Front-wheel drive models have a max tow rating of 3,500 lbs, while AWD models are slightly higher at 5,000 lbs. For most people, the Ridgeline will be enough to handle various towing needs. If you need a bit more, then the Chevrolet Colorado and GMC Canyon are ready to help.
      The EPA rates the Ridgeline AWD at 18 City/25 Highway/21 Combined. My average for the week landed at 23.6 mpg in a 60/40 mix of highway and city driving.
      Previously, we’ve considered GM’s midsize trucks as having the best ride in the class. The Honda Ridgeline now holds that honor. The unibody platform and four-wheel independent suspension setup give the Ridgeline a ride that is almost equal to a passenger sedan. Bumps and other imperfections are smoothed out. The Ridgeline is a decent handling truck as well. There isn’t much body roll and it feels stable when going into a corner. We do wish Honda would make the steering slightly heavier for the Ridgeline.
      The Honda Ridgeline may not meet the true definition of a pickup truck, but it is one in spirit. Yes, the unibody architecture does limit the capabilities of the Ridgeline as it cannot haul or tow heavy items. Nor can it go deep into the wilderness due to decisions made by Honda on the Ridgeline’s off-road capability. But it is in other areas that the Ridgeline begins to stand out such as the clever ideas in the bed, comfortable interior, and a ride that is more in tune with a regular car. They might not be the advantages you would expect in a truck, but they are something that Honda believes will bring in those interested in a pickup minus a lot of the issues that other models have. 
      To put it another way, the Honda Ridgeline is like Festivus from Seinfeld; they’re both for the rest of us.
      Disclaimer: Honda Provided the Ridgeline, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2017
      Make: Honda
      Model: Ridgeline
      Trim: RTL-E
      Engine: 3.5L SOHC 24-valve i-VTEC V6
      Driveline: Six-Speed Automatic, All-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 280 @ 6,000
      Torque @ RPM: 262 @ 4700
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 18/25/21
      Curb Weight: 4,515 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Lincoln, Alabama
      Base Price: $41,370
      As Tested Price: $42,270 (Includes $900.00 Destination Charge)
      Options: N/A
    • By William Maley
      Later this month, the 2017 Mazda CX-5 will begin arriving at dealers in the U.S. Before this happens, Mazda has revealed the pricing for the upcoming crossover. The base CX-5 Sport will carry a price tag of $24,985 (includes a $940 destination charge).
      All CX-5s will come equipped with a 2.5L SkyActiv-G four-cylinder and six-speed automatic (sorry, no manual transmission is on offer for this generation). The 2.5 produces 187 horsepower and 185 pound-feet of torque. Front-wheel drive comes standard, while Mazda's i-ACTIV all-wheel drive system adds $1,300 to the base price.
      The CX-5 Sport comes decently equipped with 17-inch alloy wheels, LED headlights, Smart City Brake Support, 7-inch color touchscreen with Mazda Connect, push-button start, and power accessories. 
      The CX-5 Touring ($26,855) adds blind-spot monitoring with rear-cross traffic alert, dual-zone climate control, leatherette upholstery, heated front seats, six-way power driver's seat, keyless entry, and auto-leveling LED headlights.
      Wrapping up the CX-5 lineup is the Grand Touring ($30,335). This model features full LED lighting outside, 19-inch alloy wheels, leather seats, eight-way power driver's seat with lumbar, rain-sensing wipers, and heated exterior mirrors.
      Options for the CX-5 include navigation, Bose audio system, heated steering wheel, heated rear seats, radar cruise control, lane departure warning, and automatic high beams.
      Source: Mazda 
      Press Release is on Page 2


      2017 MAZDA CX-5 PRICED FROM MSRP OF $24,045
      Mazda’s Best-Selling Compact Crossover SUV a Remarkable Value with Segment-Exclusive Standard and Available Technologies IRVINE, Calif. (March 8, 2017) – The previous Mazda CX-5 ended its tenure as a compact crossover SUV segment favorite, winning the praise of automotive critics and the hearts of consumers. CX-5 became Mazda’s best-selling vehicle in the U.S. Its successor, the all-new 2017 CX-5, will arrive in late March at dealerships nationwide with a starting MSRP of $24,045, building on the momentum that has made the model an unequivocal hit.
      The 2017 CX-5 hits a sweet spot in the compact crossover SUV segment for its refinement, quality, craftsmanship, design, efficiency, safety and dynamics among a long list of other reasons. No matter which trim level is selected, CX-5 also represents a remarkable value.
      The entry CX-5 Sport trim features 17-inch alloy wheels, black cloth-upholstered seats, cruise control, air conditioning, power windows, power mirrors, pushbutton starter, LED headlights, variable intermittent windshield wipers, carpeted floor mats, a 40:20:40 split-folding rear seat, Smart City Brake Support and power door locks. Additionally, CX-5 comes standard with MAZDA CONNECTTM, which pairs a 7-inch color touchscreen- and Commander-control-knob-operated infotainment display that incorporates AM/FM/HD radio, vehicle diagnostics, a backup camera, Bluetooth phone and audio integration and two USB ports for phone connectivity and charging.
      CX-5 Touring adds a six-way power driver’s seat, leatherette seating surfaces with Lux Suede inserts, Blind Spot Monitoring with Rear Cross-Traffic Alert, heated front seats, rear privacy glass, auto-leveling LED headlights, a six-speaker audio system, Mazda Advanced Keyless Entry, leather-wrapped steering wheel and shifter handle, illuminated vanity mirrors, a rear center armrest, rear HVAC vents, dual-zone climate control, rear USB ports and a reclining rear bench seat.
      Further building on CX-5 Touring is the Preferred Equipment Package, which includes a BOSE® 10-speaker audio system with CenterPoint 2 and AudioPilot 2, a power glass moonroof, power liftgate, navigation, auto-dimming mirrors with Homelink and auto on/off headlights. Customers can also opt for the Touring i-ACTIVSENSE Package on top of the Preferred Equipment Package, adding High Beam Control, Lane-Departure Warning, Lane-Keep Assist, Mazda Radar Cruise Control and Smart Brake Support.
      Adding greater levels of equipment yet is CX-5 Grand Touring, adopting black or parchment leather seating surfaces, 19-inch alloy wheels, eight-way power driver’s seat with power lumbar support, SiriusXM satellite radio, rain-sensing wipers and heated exterior mirrors. Other additions include Adaptive Front-lighting system, LED fog lights and LED tail lights. Finally, CX-5 Grand Touring’s Premium Package comes with a windshield-projected Active Driving Display with Traffic Sign Recognition, a power front passenger seat, heated rear outboard seats, heated steering wheel and windshield wiper de-icer.
      All models come standard with the SKYACTIV-G 2.5 engine and six-speed SKYACTIV-DRIVE automatic transmission. Front-wheel drive is standard, with Mazda’s predictive i-ACTIV all-wheel drive available on all trim levels.
      MSRP FOR ALL MODELS IS AS FOLLOWS:
      Model/Trim Package Front-Wheel Drive i-ACTIV AWD CX-5 Sport $24,045 $25,345 CX-5 Touring $25,915 $27,215 •Touring Preferred Equipment Package $780 $780 •Touring  
      i-ACTIVSENSE Package
      $625 $625 CX-5 Grand Touring $29,395 $30,695 •Grand Touring Premium Package $1,830 $1,830  
      AVAILABLE PREMIUM PAINT COLORS:
      Soul Red Crystal $595 Machine Gray Metallic (CX-5 Touring and Grand Touring models only) $300 Snowflake White Pearl Mica $200  

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