Jump to content
  • Greetings Guest!

    CheersandGears.com was founded in 2001 and is one of the oldest continuously operating automotive forums out there.  Come see why we have users who visit nearly every day for the past 16+ years. Signup is fast and free, or you can opt for a premium subscription to view the site ad-free.

  • William Maley
    William Maley

    Ford Releases Details on 2018 F-150 Diesel

      And then there were two...


    It has been almost a year since Ford announced that it would be introducing a diesel engine for the 2018 F-150. Details on the new engine were slim except that it would be a 3.0L turbodiesel V6. Ford has finally spilled more details on the new Power Stroke diesel for the F-150.

    The 3.0L turbodiesel V6 will pack 250 horsepower and 440 pound-feet of torque. This will come paired with a new 10-speed automatic transmission. Ford says the diesel will have a max payload capacity of 2,020 pounds and tow up to 11,400 pounds. Fuel economy figures are not out, but Ford expects the engine to return 30 mpg on the highway.

    As we suspected, the V6 engine in question is a version of the Lion turbodiesel V6 engine used in some Land Rover products. But Ford has made some key changes to have the engine stand up to the rigors that will be put upon it by owners.The crankshaft, rod bearings, turbocharger, and fuel injection system have been re-engineered. Ford has also swapped the electric cooling fan for a mechanical one as they found the electric one could not move enough air to keep the engine cool under extreme loads.

    2018 Ford F-150 PowerStoke Diesel 4.jpg

    Ford will begin taking orders for the F-150 diesel beginning this month with deliveries expected to take place in the Spring. Consumers can order the diesel engine on Lariat, King Ranch, or Platinum trims. Fleet buyers will be able to order the diesel on the XL and XLT trims. In terms of pricing, the diesel adds a $4,000 premium when compared to a truck equipped with the 2.7L EcoBoost.

    Source: Ford
    Press Release is on Page 2


    FIRST-EVER F-150 DIESEL OFFERS BEST-IN-CLASS TORQUE, TOWING, TARGETED EPA-EST. 30 MPG; YOU’RE WELCOME TRUCK FANS!

    • Ford F-150 is delivering another first – its all-new 3.0-liter Power Stroke® diesel engine targeted to return an EPA-estimated rating of 30 mpg highway 
    • Full-size truck customers who want strong fuel economy while towing and hauling win big; 3.0-liter Ford Power Stroke V6 diesel engine delivers best-in-class diesel towing and payload
    • Arriving this spring, F-150 with 3.0-liter Power Stroke engine provides best-in-class diesel 250 horsepower and 440 lb.-ft. of torque – and makes for a sixth engine choice for F-150 customers

    DEARBORN, Mich., Jan. 8, 2018 – Full-size diesel truck fans have reason to celebrate this year as Ford – America’s truck sales leader – delivers the first-ever F-150 Power Stroke diesel with a targeted EPA-estimated 30 mpg highway rating, a best-in-class 11,400 pounds of towing capacity and 2,020 pounds of payload capacity, plus best-in-class diesel 250 horsepower and 440 lb.-ft. of torque.

    “For every truck owner who wants strong fuel economy while they tow and haul, we offer a new 3.0-liter Power Stroke® V6 engine that dreams are made of,” said Dave Filipe, vice president global powertrain engineering. “The more you tow and the longer you haul, the more you’ll appreciate its class-leading towing and payload capacity and how efficient it is at the pump.”

    This all-new 3.0-liter Power Stroke diesel now makes for six engine choices for F-150 customers.

    F-150’s all-new Power Stroke diesel features commercial-grade design
    The highly anticipated F-150 Power Stroke diesel shares proven commercial-grade technology with F-Series Super Duty’s larger 6.7-liter Power Stroke – America’s most powerful, capable heavy-duty pickup truck ever.

    The very same Ford powertrain team behind the 6.7-liter Power Stroke for Super Duty trucks since 2011 designed and engineered this all-new 3.0-liter Power Stroke V6 diesel engine to the specific needs of North American F-150 customers who tow and haul frequently.

    Peak torque comes at just 1,750 rpm with strong torque delivery continuing throughout the rpm range, which is ideal for towing or hauling heavy loads over long distances.

    This new V6 diesel features the same compacted-graphite iron block material construction and forged-steel crank used in the 2.7-liter EcoBoost® engine for added strength and durability along with reduced weight.

    For greater responsiveness and reduced turbo lag, the Ford truck team chose a high-efficiency variable-geometry turbocharger. A common-rail fuel injection system precisely optimizes performance and fuel efficiency, while a high-pressure 29,000 pounds per square inch injection calibration enables smoother, quieter operation with reduced emissions. 

    Dual fuel filters are added for improved break-in, while a cast-aluminum oil pan and two-stage oil pump mean reduced parasitic loss and improved fuel efficiency.

    Engineered to tow under grueling conditions
    Engineering the most efficient F-150 towing machine ever is enabled by F-150’s high-strength, military-grade, aluminum-alloy body, introduced in 2015. This revolutionary construction lightened the load by 700 pounds, allowing engineers to invest in additional technologies to further improve towing and payload capability, as well as greater fuel economy, even when towing. For 2018, stronger axles coupled with the fully boxed, high-strength steel frame add further robustness.

    The Ford truck team paid particular attention to extreme driving conditions when engineering the all-new 3.0-liter Power Stroke diesel, which features a premium mechanical engine-driven fan and dual radiator shutters for improved high temperature, high-altitude performance – a key advantage versus the electric cooling fans used by competitors.

    “We know that competing diesels with electric cooling fans have to dial back on power under extreme heat and altitude, so we decided on a viscous-controlled mechanical fan that has the capacity to move much more air across the radiator and intercooler in extreme conditions,” said David Ives, Ford diesel engine technical specialist. “This gives F-150 Power Stroke owners more power and more passing capability in harsh conditions.”

    In more moderate driving and towing conditions, the F-150 engine control system backs off the fan load through a viscous coupler, closing down the two radiator shutters for improved aerodynamic efficiency and reduced parasitic engine loss.

    Calibrated specifically for the all-new 3.0-liter Power Stroke diesel’s low-end power and torque curves, a standard SelectShift® 10-speed automatic transmission maximizes shift points and gear ratios to optimize power, low-rpm torque and efficiency. This segment-exclusive transmission can non-sequentially select the right gear ratio based on need – for best-in-class performance. To help reduce fuel consumption and vehicle emissions during city driving, Auto Start-Stop also comes standard.

    In testing along the legendary Davis Dam in Arizona, F-150 equipped with the all-new 3.0-liter Power Stroke diesel engine climbed 13 miles at a 6 percent grade in temperatures in excess of 100 degrees – maintaining consistent power output throughout.

    Order now for delivery this spring
    In mid-January, Ford dealers begin taking orders for the 2018 F-150 with all-new 3.0-liter Power Stroke diesel engine. Deliveries begin this spring.

    The all-new 3.0-liter Power Stroke is available for both 4x2 and 4x4 F-150 pickups. Retail customers can choose this engine option for 2018 F-150 Lariat, King Ranch and Platinum edition SuperCrew trucks with either a 5.5-foot or 6.5-foot bed configuration, and SuperCab trucks with a 6.5-foot bed configuration.

    For fleet customers who use their truck for work, the 3.0-liter Power Stroke diesel engine will be available on all F-150 trim levels with SuperCrew 5.5-foot or 6.5-foot bed configurations and SuperCab trucks with a 6.5 foot bed.




    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments



    Hmmm very interesting. I hope it can scoot a little quicker than the Ram's 3.0 diesel because that's pretty dang slow but I don't see it being much quicker. 

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Very cool and Interesting, I do question their statement about changing out the electric cooling fans for a mechanical one. That makes ZERO Engineering sense to me as the electric cooling fans have proven themselves in cooling large loads of extreme heat. One has to wonder if this is a cut corner to control cost more than anything else.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    30 mpg on a pickup will be the headline maker.  I think that is the "4 minute mile" so to speak for pickups, that whoever hits it first will get all the press.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    6 minutes ago, smk4565 said:

    30 mpg on a pickup will be the headline maker.  I think that is the "4 minute mile" so to speak for pickups, that whoever hits it first will get all the press.

    Be interesting to see how people respond to the 30 MPG, but it is Diesel. I think existing diesel owners will not think twice about snapping up one, but I wonder what the conquest rate will end up being.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    22 hours ago, smk4565 said:

    30 mpg on a pickup will be the headline maker.  I think that is the "4 minute mile" so to speak for pickups, that whoever hits it first will get all the press.

    Ram Ecodiesel and Colorado Duramax's already offer 30+ MPG.

    On 1/8/2018 at 10:32 AM, ccap41 said:

    Hmmm very interesting. I hope it can scoot a little quicker than the Ram's 3.0 diesel because that's pretty dang slow but I don't see it being much quicker. 

    The 19 Ram should get the Next Gen Ecodiesel coming out in the Wrangler which matches this or is even higher in power and torque (can't remember the Wrangler ratings off hand). 

    Looked it up.  In the Wrangler it makes 260/442 so the 19 Ram should make at least that much in Ecodiesel form. 

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    8 minutes ago, ccap41 said:

    Let's hope the Ram goes on a diet then. 

    No doubt similar to the Wrangler diet.  That thing shaved a few hundred pounds with a much lower weight to start with. 

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    The upgrades they made to the engine sound like they should be mandatory for the Land Rover too. It's the more expensive vehicle.....

     

    I mean da fuq, no wonder those oil sheikhs/barons in the middle east ditch their Land Rovers for Land Cruisers when their enter the deserts - the damn thing can't cool itself!

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    15 hours ago, Stew said:

    No doubt similar to the Wrangler diet.  That thing shaved a few hundred pounds with a much lower weight to start with. 

    Much lower weight compared to what? 

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    3 minutes ago, ccap41 said:

    Much lower weight compared to what? 

    Lower than the Ram, comparing the JK to the current model. 

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    12 minutes ago, Stew said:

    Lower than the Ram, comparing the JK to the current model. 

    Ohhhh Yeah, definitely lower than the Ram.

    What is the ballpark range or weight for the Wrangler? I've never looked at those. 

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    36 minutes ago, ccap41 said:

    Ohhhh Yeah, definitely lower than the Ram.

    What is the ballpark range or weight for the Wrangler? I've never looked at those. 

    I will have to look it up, seems like 4k+ for the JK

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    11 minutes ago, Stew said:

    I will have to look it up, seems like 4k+ for the JK

    This Unlimited Rubicon weighted 4600lbs and they said that's the lightest they've ever weighed one at. 

    2016 MT Unlimited Rubicon Test Review

    It seems very difficult to find a 2 door version to compare to. I'd assume a few hundred pounds less on a comparable trim. 

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Yes, i think the 2 doors are around 4k pounds, maybe 4200.  The Unlimiteds were really heavy, but that is one negative to making them so offroad capable with standard 4WD.  All that offroad equipment adds weight.  i find it rather amazing the JL lost a good bit of weight while actually getting even stouter axles and off-road equipment. 

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Plus the extra off road goodies on the Rubicon that isn't on lesser 4WD trims. I bet that stuff alone adds 100-150lbs on top of a standard 4WD Unlimited. 

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I'm waiting for some real world testing before making any judgement on this. $4000 premium for the diesel, and only available to the general population with premium packages.  Why does diesel option also mean leather, heated wheel, navigation, and so on. 

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    33 minutes ago, Scout said:

    I'm waiting for some real world testing before making any judgement on this. $4000 premium for the diesel, and only available to the general population with premium packages.  Why does diesel option also mean leather, heated wheel, navigation, and so on. 

    More profit...so that $4000 premium becomes a $6-10k premium with the packages...

    Edited by Cubical-aka-Moltar

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    20 minutes ago, ccap41 said:

    Plus the extra off road goodies on the Rubicon that isn't on lesser 4WD trims. I bet that stuff alone adds 100-150lbs on top of a standard 4WD Unlimited. 

    Oh no doubt, but so worth it.  Heck, it even comes with bigger tires on the JL. 

    12 minutes ago, Scout said:

    I'm waiting for some real world testing before making any judgement on this. $4000 premium for the diesel, and only available to the general population with premium packages.  Why does diesel option also mean leather, heated wheel, navigation, and so on. 

    I hate it when they do that, I hate that you can't get the ecodiesel on the 2 door Wrangler.  I know Ram did offer the EcoD on the regular cab/long bed work truck, not sure about now though. 

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    4 minutes ago, Stew said:

    Oh no doubt, but so worth it.  Heck, it even comes with bigger tires on the JL. 

    I was actually reading a little on this and it depends. 

    From the review I read if you plan on building up your Wrangler then it's a waste to pay the premium up front because you're replacing pretty much everything you just paid for anyway. 

    Pretty neat read on it.

    http://www.fourwheeler.com/project-vehicles/154-1105-jeep-wrangler-rubicon-vs-regular-wrangler/

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    2 minutes ago, ccap41 said:

    I was actually reading a little on this and it depends. 

    From the review I read if you plan on building up your Wrangler then it's a waste to pay the premium up front because you're replacing pretty much everything you just paid for anyway. 

    Pretty neat read on it.

    http://www.fourwheeler.com/project-vehicles/154-1105-jeep-wrangler-rubicon-vs-regular-wrangler/

    The JL is a different beast altogether now.  It has 33s standard, but the Rubicon's Fenders are now setup to hold 35s without any modification which is huge or for the Wrangler as that is the most popular aftermarket tire size.  All the little things they have done that are truly functional on the JL is amazing.  Even those vents behind the front wheels are there for a reason instead of looks.  it vents air from underneath the hood so no more hood moving issues as n the JK.  

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    2 minutes ago, Cubical-aka-Moltar said:

    More profit...so that $4000 premium becomes a $6-10k premium with the packages...and they probably wouldn't want a lower trim F150 diesel cutting into  F250 diesel 'work truck' fleet sales.. 

    You may have something with the diesel 150 cutting into 250 sales. But I don't think that will be an issue. The XLT is Ford's bread and butter. Not offering the option on the most bought model will just mean they loose more sales than convert to premium sales IMO. The 250s never had anything to worry about from a tweener truck. Kinda like the Nissan Titan solved a problem no one has. The biggest thing the diesel F150 will have going is FE. But that comes with a $4000 premium on top of a luxury package premium. So the only way this makes sense is for fleet s that can get deals on lower end models. Unless one just wants diesel to say they have it. Just like some Titan owners can say my truck has a Cummins. And we've seen the take rate there. 

    • Upvote 1

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    ccap41

    Posted (edited)

    17 minutes ago, Stew said:

    I hate it when they do that, I hate that you can't get the ecodiesel on the 2 door Wrangler.  I know Ram did offer the EcoD on the regular cab/long bed work truck, not sure about now though. 

    I agree... They all do it but I hate it. I think "old" Ford would have allowed it but this recent transition where they're trying to eliminate having 10,000 different configurations(for understandable reasons) is a big reason why. 

    5 minutes ago, Scout said:

    You may have something with the diesel 150 cutting into 250 sales. But I don't think that will be an issue.

    Did the Ram Ecodiesel cut into fleet 2500 Cummins sales? 

    I sure wouldn't think so. Anybody who's buying a Cummins for a fleet vehicle is VERY likely using it for its intended purpose and a 1500 wouldn't suffice. 

    Edited by ccap41

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    5 minutes ago, ccap41 said:

     Did the Ram Ecodiesel cut into fleet 2500 Cummins sales? 

    I sure wouldn't think so. Anybody who's buying a Cummins for a fleet vehicle is VERY likely using it for its intended purpose and a 1500 wouldn't suffice. 

    Yeah, nix that idea....I went back and re-read--they are offering it in XL and XLT trims for fleet sales.    Just not for civilians...wonder what the % of sales to civilians in those trims are out of the total? 

    Edited by Cubical-aka-Moltar
    • Like 1

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    5 minutes ago, ccap41 said:

    I agree... They all do it but I hate it. I think "old" Ford would have allowed it but this recent transition where they're trying to eliminate having 10,000 different configurations(for understandable reasons) is a big reason why. 

    Did the Ram Ecodiesel cut into fleet 2500 Cummins sales? 

    I sure wouldn't think so. Anybody who's buying a Cummins for a fleet vehicle is VERY likely using it for its intended purpose and a 1500 wouldn't suffice. 

    Don't know, but I doubt it.  The 1/2 ton diesels don't offer the same capability as the HDs and I would say the ones paying for an HD, especially with a diesel, needs that capability. 

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites



    Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

    Guest
    You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




About us

CheersandGears.com - Founded 2001

We ♥ Cars

Get in touch

Follow us

Recent tweets

facebook

×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.