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    GM's Workers At Oshawa Want A Deal That Ensures The Future of Production


    • The future of GM's Oshawa plant will be a topic of focus for auto workers during this round of union contract talks

    This week, Fiat Chrysler Automobiles, Ford, and General Motors begin talks with Unifor, Canada’s auto workers union for new agreements. GM will likely have the most contentious talks as workers at GM's Oshawa plant don't know what the future holds after 2018.

     

    The plant has already lost a third shift and about 1,000 jobs when it moved production of the Camaro to Lansing last year. Next year will see the end of production of the Chevrolet Equinox, leaving just the Buick Regal and Cadillac XTS. GM has said time and time again for the past two years that it needs to know labor costs before making any decisions on the plant, only causing the worry to increase.

     

    “The company in the past have had feasibility studies or launch teams if we are going to get product. This year, there’s no feasibility studies going on, no launch teams,” said Colin James, president of Unifor Local 222 to The Detroit News.

     

    “Of course, it’s led to a lot of our members in the plant asking questions. There’s uncertainty: ‘Why is there no launch team?’ ‘Are they planning on closing the facility?’ General Motors is basically not answering that question.”

     

    Yesterday at a news conference in Toronto, Unifor president Jerry Dias said workers at Oshawa will not sign a contract unless there are plans for production.

     

    “We are not going to leave negotiations until we have a firm commitment from General Motors on product,” said Dias.

     

    “We firmly believe General Motors will exit Oshawa unless we have a firm commitment.”

     

    But GM has said that it will not make any commitments on investments until there is an agreement in place.

     

    “We won’t be in a position to make a competitive investment decision until after we are through the negotiations,” said David Paterson, GM Canada’s vice-president of corporate affairs.

     

    “We understand that there is a lot of anxiety about Oshawa," Paterson said. He went onto say that GM's focus during the talks is to work on an agreement that is "mutually beneficial and economically competitive."

     

    Whether or not GM and Unifor are able to work an agreement before September 19th remains to be seen. We'll be keeping a close eye on this.

     

    Source: The Toronto Star, The Detroit News

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    There should have been assurances put forth when the Canadian Federal and Ontario provincial governments bailed them out that GM would keep X products being assembled in Canada.

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    Oh please, I can see Oshawa closing from here..... I don't know why the workers on site wouldn't see it. 

    I think they know as well, they just don't want it to come to fruition. 

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    Well.

    I also saw this coming when the CDN government sold off their remaining shares in GM.

     

    I wanted to say if I was in charge of these things I would have kept a controlling interest in GM Canada shares to prevent Oshawa from closing forcing GM Detroit Headquarters to keep Oshawa open with cars being built there, but Im not sure the bailout agreement was written that way for that to happen...

     

    Yep. Oshawa will be closing.

     

    I wonder what El Kabong thinks about this...will he vehemently HATE on GM now he being Canadian and all?

     

    Us Canadians are kinda like you Americans (THANX OBAMA), Im sure he will just blame Justin Trudeau for this and continue on ranting about FoMoCo.

     

    http://www.wsj.com/articles/canada-sells-remaining-shares-in-general-motors-1428363868

     

    http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2015/04/08/gm-share-sale-canadian-government_n_

     

    7024464.html

     

    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/canada-to-sell-final-73-4-million-shares-of-gm-from-bailout/article23814942/

     

    from the last link above:

    Labour leaders had urged Ontario and Ottawa to hold on to the shares as a bargaining chip in securing pledges from GM to maintain jobs in Canada.

    “It would have been ideal for the government to hold on to the shares and use that to leverage General Motors to make a strong commitment to the facility in Oshawa,” said Hassan Yussuff, President of the Canadian Labour Congress, in an interview Monday. “Obviously, the government is using every means possible to raise as much cash as they can without considering the future of the auto industry in the country.”

     

     

    trudeau%2Bsanta%2Bcons.jpg

    3298d1440c98a4107f3e82df8e21176c5abba0ea

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    Im disappointed in this as I see the writing on the wall.

    Damned right pissed off I am.

    But at the end of the day, GM has to remain profitable and if the CAW  and Oshawa cannot come to an agreement for GM to remain profitable in any way they can. Then so be it.

     

    Canada should be looking at Hyundai and anybody else to build their cars here, not just GM, Ford and Chrysler,  but that also means that the CAW has to realize that Mexico is quite competitive and adept in building cars too...and part of NAFTA...

     

     

    EDIT:

    BECAUSE I AGREE WITH DREW ABOUT THE CAW AND I UNDERSTAND WHAT IS GOING ON BEFORE DREW MADE HIS LAST POST!!!

    Edited by oldshurst442
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    If the Regal and XTS are all they are making, that plant looks like it is closing.  XTS doesn't have much time left, the next Regal could be built where any Epsilon car is made, and they don't make that many of them to begin with.

     

    Sadly I think most sedans from the Big 3 will get built in Mexico where the labor is cheaper, and the SUVs and trucks will get made here.  Unless the UAW wants to accept starting wages at $18 an hour not $29 an hour these jobs will keep leaving.  All these factories offer overtime, an entry level auto worker could still make $40k a year with benefits at $18-19 an hour.  UAW wants $60-70k a year wages to build cars, no wonder the Big 3 are leaving.  The unions aren't doing their members any favors, and the didn't do them any favors in the 90s or 2000s either.    Notice the non-union auto factories in the South are not shutting down, most of them are expanding.  And I am democrat.

    Edited by smk4565
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    No one promises you work or a job for life, and business should never do it. Reality is you keep your trade skills sharp and learn new things or become unemployed. I am so sick of unions thinking they are superior and have to have promises of lifelong employment. Welcome to the 21st century and if you are that ignorant to not see this coming you deserve what you get.

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    Oh please, I can see Oshawa closing from here..... I don't know why the workers on site wouldn't see it.

    Fear makes for powerful blinders. I feel for my former co-workers. But Oshawa is done. The Government of Ontario and Unifor have combined to make it too expensive to make cars in the province. Ingersoll should take notice.

    I think more of the blame lies with the CAW than with the Canadian government.

    The Feds don't have much say about it. The Provincial government is mainly to blame on the elected-official side of the table.

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    If the Regal and XTS are all they are making, that plant looks like it is closing.  XTS doesn't have much time left, the next Regal could be built where any Epsilon car is made, and they don't make that many of them to begin with.

     

    Sadly I think most sedans from the Big 3 will get built in Mexico where the labor is cheaper, and the SUVs and trucks will get made here.  Unless the UAW wants to accept starting wages at $18 an hour not $29 an hour these jobs will keep leaving.  All these factories offer overtime, an entry level auto worker could still make $40k a year with benefits at $18-19 an hour.  UAW wants $60-70k a year wages to build cars, no wonder the Big 3 are leaving.  The unions aren't doing their members any favors, and the didn't do them any favors in the 90s or 2000s either.    Notice the non-union auto factories in the South are not shutting down, most of them are expanding.  And I am democrat.

     

     

    Just sedans? You must be kidding.....FCA has plans to have most of their lineup built in Mexico or imported in the next ten years.....and I expect other automakers to build more down there too, as Wall Street expects a better profit margin from the automakers.....

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    Oh please, I can see Oshawa closing from here..... I don't know why the workers on site wouldn't see it. 

     

     

    They knew that 10 years ago.......

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    Times have changes and Unions can no longer dictate what they want. The CAW needs to learn what most of the UAW locals have learned. 

    Today GM has more plants and capacity than they need. The locals that are thriving have learned to work with GM and make a plant profitable and competitive. They make deals that are beneficial to both sides. Places like Lordstown were a steaming heap of non competitiveness. GM was on the way to closing them down. But the local there has learned to work with the new GM and they have been rewarded with good product and much in overtime. GM is making money and the UAW workers are making money. 

    We see the same in Kansas and most Michigan plants. So far this is working well with balance. 

    The CAW at Oshawa has been hostile and demanding and that does not play anymore. GM has options and choices that do not have to include Mexico anymore. 

    Before GM had few options with the unions and were forced into many bad deals and I see them protecting themselves from this. 

     

    Some folks need to still get it thought their heads that it takes a good relationship on both sides to make this work. MFG are not endless pits of money that can be abused or we will end up like 2008 but eve much faster. 

    The truth is companies are here to make money and produce income to share holders. Their primary purpose is not just to provide jobs. Harsh sounding but that is how life is. As in nature a salmon must die to support a Bear. But in this case things can be worked out to where very one benefits if both sides are smart. 

    As it is Oshawa got a big head as they had good ratings in quality and have a large facility but that matters little in today's markets where pretty much any plant can match their quality and smaller plants can beat their efficiency. 

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    Well.

    I also saw this coming when the CDN government sold off their remaining shares in GM.

     

    I wanted to say if I was in charge of these things I would have kept a controlling interest in GM Canada shares to prevent Oshawa from closing forcing GM Detroit Headquarters to keep Oshawa open with cars being built there, but Im not sure the bailout agreement was written that way for that to happen...

     

    Yep. Oshawa will be closing.

     

    I wonder what El Kabong thinks about this...will he vehemently HATE on GM now he being Canadian and all?

     

    Us Canadians are kinda like you Americans (THANX OBAMA), Im sure he will just blame Justin Trudeau for this and continue on ranting about FoMoCo.

    Nonsense.

    In all likelihood it was Montreal's supremely inept manufacturing plant that helped secure me at least two or three more years in Oshawa than I would otherwise have gotten.

    Now stop grasping at straws. You just look silly

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    Well.

    I also saw this coming when the CDN government sold off their remaining shares in GM.

     

    I wanted to say if I was in charge of these things I would have kept a controlling interest in GM Canada shares to prevent Oshawa from closing forcing GM Detroit Headquarters to keep Oshawa open with cars being built there, but Im not sure the bailout agreement was written that way for that to happen...

     

    Yep. Oshawa will be closing.

     

    I wonder what El Kabong thinks about this...will he vehemently HATE on GM now he being Canadian and all?

     

    Us Canadians are kinda like you Americans (THANX OBAMA), Im sure he will just blame Justin Trudeau for this and continue on ranting about FoMoCo.

    Nonsense.

    In all likelihood it was Montreal's supremely inept manufacturing plant that helped secure me at least two or three more years in Oshawa than I would otherwise have gotten.

    Now stop grasping at straws. You just look silly

     

     

    I know about that plant....

     

    Chevy Celebrities would be rolling off the line while the GM worker would be sitting down on a chair reading Le Journal de Montréal and when the Celebrity would be at his station, the GM worker would put down his newspaper, get up, approach the vehicle, do what he has to do and go back to his paper awaiting the next vehicle to come his way...

     

    My dad bought a brand new 1986 Chevy Celebrity.  Iron Duke powered, AM radio only stripper. I still have fond memories of that car. It served our family well!

     

    This aint about that.

    Its about me calling you out on a certain hypocritical view point you may have regarding GM versus FoMoCo.

     

    You brought up Saint-Thérèse...

    You have countless of times knocked Ford for mediocrity...

     

    You see where Im getting at?

     

    YOU take shots at Ford for mediocrity...

    YOU brought up Sainte-Thérèse...

    I call you up on hypocrisy....

     

    Sorry El K...

    C'est La Vie!

    150811165239-trump-shrug-gif-custom-1.gi

     

     

     

    I REALLY SHOULD DO A CANADIAN ONE....

    justin-trudeau-shrug.gif

    Edited by oldshurst442
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    Don't be sorry.

    I ain't, so why should you be?

     

     

    Oh...that wasnt me being apologetic..

     

    That was me being polite telling you to...go get your &@#$+# shine box

     

    Trying to make it seem like Im kidding with you....busting your ballz a little bit...

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    Oh.

    ...I still don't feel bad. Ford stuff don't do a whole lot for me at the best of times, and too many of their fans say stupid things for me to not laugh/cringe at them.

    Like blaming True-d'oh for Oshawa's predicament, for instance. There's plenty I can make fun of him for... but this ain't one of them.

    Sure helped you make a nice leap to take a dig at me tho

    Edited by El Kabong
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    Oh.

    ...I still don't feel bad. Ford stuff don't do a whole lot for me at the best of times, and too many of their fans say stupid things for me to not laugh/cringe at.

     

    Riiiiiight!

     

    You consume yourself silly daily laughing at Ford because of what Ford fans say....

     

    What you just said  would be some of the stupid things GM fans say and THAT makes ANYBODY laugh/cringe at...

     

    Again...this whole hypocrisy thing...

    You just cant seem to shake that off, can you?

     

     

    About Trudeau and taking a nice leap to take a dig at you....

     

    That is the beauty of it....

    You probably thought of it...so it wasnt much of a nice leap  as it was a just a little casual stroll...laughing at you....having fun at your expense, the way I did with Wings....

     

    Its easy to do to both of you since both of you have only 1 objective....

     

    OK....

    ONWARD and upward moving forward about Oshawa.....

    Edited by oldshurst442
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    Times have changes and Unions can no longer dictate what they want. The CAW needs to learn what most of the UAW locals have learned. 

    Today GM has more plants and capacity than they need. The locals that are thriving have learned to work with GM and make a plant profitable and competitive. They make deals that are beneficial to both sides. Places like Lordstown were a steaming heap of non competitiveness. GM was on the way to closing them down. But the local there has learned to work with the new GM and they have been rewarded with good product and much in overtime. GM is making money and the UAW workers are making money. 

    We see the same in Kansas and most Michigan plants. So far this is working well with balance. 

    The CAW at Oshawa has been hostile and demanding and that does not play anymore. GM has options and choices that do not have to include Mexico anymore. 

    Before GM had few options with the unions and were forced into many bad deals and I see them protecting themselves from this. 

     

    Some folks need to still get it thought their heads that it takes a good relationship on both sides to make this work. MFG are not endless pits of money that can be abused or we will end up like 2008 but eve much faster. 

    The truth is companies are here to make money and produce income to share holders. Their primary purpose is not just to provide jobs. Harsh sounding but that is how life is. As in nature a salmon must die to support a Bear. But in this case things can be worked out to where very one benefits if both sides are smart. 

    As it is Oshawa got a big head as they had good ratings in quality and have a large facility but that matters little in today's markets where pretty much any plant can match their quality and smaller plants can beat their efficiency. 

     

    Bump....

     

    Because the last couple of posts after this one is just a hot pile of shyte!

    And THIS is bang on to what is going on in Oshawa.

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    Nice hot take.

    Or you could ask the guy who, you know, used to actually WORK AT OSHAWA.

    ...back in '06 or so when the 'schwa was churning out Impalas and Centurys to fleets far and wide I told a union brother that as it currently sits the place had about ten or fifteen years left in it. He thought I was nuts. But I read the news and the magazines and sales and percentage breakdowns. The place was building mostly mediocre stuff-that simple. And I wasn't afraid to bust GM's chops for it even as I helped build it, mainly in the old AWCC. Just awful stuff. Even their "innovations" were bad-transverse smallblocks driving front wheels wider than the rears?

    The housing crash and Great Recession came shortly after, of course. And in between the (very good) truck plant got taken away because of cheaper labor in Mexico. The product deficiencies and truck plant, plus the recession, should have clued Unifor in that things needed to change, and clued in management that they needed better product to build.

    Unfortunately the union missed the point entirely, and the product was hit (Camaro) and miss (Regal). I suspect that CAW/Unifor had reached the same conclusions about Oshawa as I had but decided on a long-term strategy of getting the old boys as many 30-year pensions as they could rather then roll with the punches and restructure contracts and wage models. And now you have the endgame playing out before your eyes.

    Alternately, you could do verbal diarrhea with personal digs and politician name-dropping as informed conversation. I'll see if I can get Mean Gene Okerlund on the phone to moderate that.

    Edited by El Kabong
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    verbal diarrhea is what you do....

     

    Like Wings.....YOU are VERY insightful...yet you dont share those views with us....you grace our presence with crap biased agaisnt and solely at Ford..and to get away with it..you have nice Vince McMahon speeches yourself, such as your signature: It's just facts. Nothing personal.

     

     

    You wanna get Mean Gene Okerlund?

     

    OK....as long as I could get  Stone Cold Steve Austin!

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    Nonsense.

    My time in Oshawa was absolutely critical to making the views I hold today. I saw firsthand the futility of whoring out to fleet and minimizing product innovation. I saw people pat themselves on the back and crow about improvements in sales numbers and vehicle quality when they were only measuring against their own past efforts. Most of all, I saw how destructive those blinders and hidebound ideologies were to a brand.

    At this point I should point out that you're choosing a guy who slapped around his wife to use as an example for... well, I'm not really sure what.

    Jes' sayin'

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    Nonsense.

    My time in Oshawa was absolutely critical to making the views I hold today. I saw firsthand the futility of whoring out to fleet and minimizing product innovation. I saw people pat themselves on the back and crow about improvements in sales numbers and vehicle quality when they were only measuring against their own past efforts. Most of all, I saw how destructive those blinders and hidebound ideologies were to a brand.

    At this point I should point out that you're choosing a guy who slapped around his wife to use as an example for... well, I'm not really sure what.

    Jes' sayin'

     

    Jes sayin....for what?

     

    Stone Cold Steve is just a character on TV and the wrestling circuit...for entertainment

    Just like this character......

     

     

    el-kabong-o.gif

     

    The man playing Stone Cold Steve is the one with the problems...

    Dont know him, dont really care for him...

     

    However....I aint the one that has named my internet persona as some sort of sexual perverse joke of some sort....

     

    URBAN DICTIONARY:

     

     

    A surprise attack using a flacid penis to startle an unsuspecting victim. This is usually done by slapping a distracted person across the face or head with your penis while yelling the phrase "El Kabong" to proclaim your successful prank over the El Kabonged individual, and alert any witnesses to the humorous use of your private parts.

     

     

    Jes sayin'

     

     

    And yes...we can continue...

    Onward, upward and moving forward.

    Edited by oldshurst442
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    Again: feel free to reference my first-hand experience in Oshawa. It's worlds better than whatever you carry on with. And if has important lessons in there for those wise enough to see and do.

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      “By leaving, the country would lose access to the EU Single Market which guarantees unconstrained trade across the member states. It would mean various countries would be leveraging tariffs on British-made goods, making production in the country less competitive.”
      Former British member of parliament and business secretary Sir Vincent Cable outlined how bad this decision looks for Vauxhall in a recent interview on BBC Radio 4.
      There could be a way that the British Government could at least stall the possible closures. Back in October, the British Government worked out a secret deal with Nissan to keep them investing in British car production at their plant in Sunderland. This deal caused an uproar as the details were kept as many believed the British Government would be handing over money to keep Nissan happy. But sources told British newspaper The Independent back in January that the deal had no mention of money.
      It could be that the British Government could do something similar for PSA Group to keep jobs, but it is too early to say if this will happen or not.
      2: Will this affect PSA’s plans of entering the U.S.?
      Probably not. Let’s remember that PSA Group is working through a ten-year plan that may or may not see the return of the Citroen and Peugeot, along with the introduction of DS to the country. Already, the first part of this plan is gearing up for the launch of a car sharing service next month. There is also extensive research going on into the U.S. marketplace. 
      But could there be a possibility of Opel or Vauxhall vehicles being sold here? It would not be surprising if there isn’t talk about this at PSA Group’s HQ. But there is a slight complication to this idea. As part of the sale, PSA Group cannot sell any Opel vehicles developed by GM anywhere in various markets outside of Europe (China and U.S. for example) until they transition to PSA platforms. That means a number of models such as the Astra, Insignia, and Mokka are out of the question for the time being. If Opel was chosen to be one of the brands PSA would sell in the U.S., they might not have a full line of vehicles to sell due to this clause.
      3: What does the future hold for Buick and Holden?
      If there are some losers from the sale of Opel, it has to Buick and Holden. Buick has found some success with Opel products as the Encore (rebadged Mokka) has become one the best-selling models for the brand. Holden is getting a shot in the arm as the Astra will hopefully help their fortunes in the compact space, and the new Commodore (rebadged Insignia) has a tough task ahead of it with living up to an iconic name. For the time being, Opel will continue supplying models to both brands. It is what happens in the future that many are concerned about.
      During the Geneva Motor Show, GM President Dan Ammann said something very interest to Australian journalists about the future of Holden’s products.
      This makes sense as the Astra was only launched and the Commodore is getting ready to go on sale. But I wouldn’t be surprised if talks begin very soon about this very topic. The same talks are likely to begin at Buick soon where they face the same issue for the Regal and Encore. Our hunch is Buick might have the easier time of two. The Encore would continue on since it shares the same platform as the Chevrolet Trax. As for the Regal, it could leave Buick’s lineup once the next-generation model runs its course.
      4: Does GM lose anything with this deal?
      There has been a lot of talk about how much money will be freed up from the sale of Opel/Vauxhall for GM, along with making a bit more profit. But it comes at a cost that could hurt GM down the road. The recent crop of compact and midsize sedans from GM owe a lot to Opel’s engineering knowledge. Vehicles that excel in driving dynamics and fuel economy are worth their weight in gold when it comes to the European marketplace. As we know, one part of why GM went into bankruptcy was the lack of competitive small and midsize cars that got good fuel economy. Opel would prove to be GM’s savior with this key knowledge.
      Right now, compacts and midsize sedans aren’t selling as consumers are directing their attention to crossovers and SUVs. This is due in part to lower gas prices. But sooner or later, the price of gas will go back up and cause many to go back to smaller vehicles. With talk about GM scaling back on their small and midsize car lineup, this decision could have consequences down the road. Plus with Opel out of the picture, GM doesn’t have someone it can rely on to get these models back to the forefront. We can hope GM’s North American office has learned some stuff when working with their European counterparts.

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    • By William Maley
      General Motors seems being in a cutting mood as it drives to improve its profit margins and stock price. Last week saw the sale of Opel and Vauxhall to PSA Group and it's only the beginning said GM CEO Mary Barra.
      Automotive News reports that GM is considering reducing investments in North American cars and "select" international markets according to a chart that was shared during a conference call with analysts last week. The chart says these two earned a spot on the chopping block due to low profit potential and weak strength in franchises.
      "There's a little bit more work that we're doing in the international markets. Our overall philosophy is that every country, every market segment has to earn its cost of capital," Barra said on the conference call. 
      Barra and GM President Dan Ammann declined to go into details about these plans.
      GM has already made significant changes in terms of their international operations by ending or reducing operations Australia, Indonesia, Russia, and Thailand. The automaker has also scaled back plans in India. The comments made during the call suggest more cuts could take place here and possibly elsewhere.
      As for 'reducing investments in North American cars', this likely means GM is taking a hard look at various segments in passenger car segment. With consumers trending towards utility vehicles and trucks, sales of passenger cars have been falling precipitously. As of March 1st, dealers had four month's worth of inventory of cars, compared to an 81-day supply for light trucks and less than 60-days for full-size SUVs. GM could walk away from certain segments such as compacts or full-size sedans, or delay investments in certain models.
      These moves will allow GM to funnel money into models that make more money, and returning capital to shareholders.
      "That's an immediate opportunity for us to reward shareholders without changing the risk profile of the company or our ability to manage through a downturn," GM CFO Chuck Stevens said.
      Analysts are mixed on GM's plans.
      "It takes a lot of discipline to shift away from a volume-is-king kind of mentality," she said. "In the end, that's going to make a better GM -- a longer-standing company that's not only more profitable but more relevant," said Rebecca Lindland, a senior analyst with Kelley Blue Book to Automotive News.
      John Murphy, an analyst with Bank of America Merrill Lynch isn't so sure about this plan.
      "It appears that GM's recent decision-making has become much more short-term-focused and, in our opinion, could create challenges for the company in the coming years," Murphy wrote in a report.
      Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required)

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      General Motors seems being in a cutting mood as it drives to improve its profit margins and stock price. Last week saw the sale of Opel and Vauxhall to PSA Group and it's only the beginning said GM CEO Mary Barra.
      Automotive News reports that GM is considering reducing investments in North American cars and "select" international markets according to a chart that was shared during a conference call with analysts last week. The chart says these two earned a spot on the chopping block due to low profit potential and weak strength in franchises.
      "There's a little bit more work that we're doing in the international markets. Our overall philosophy is that every country, every market segment has to earn its cost of capital," Barra said on the conference call. 
      Barra and GM President Dan Ammann declined to go into details about these plans.
      GM has already made significant changes in terms of their international operations by ending or reducing operations Australia, Indonesia, Russia, and Thailand. The automaker has also scaled back plans in India. The comments made during the call suggest more cuts could take place here and possibly elsewhere.
      As for 'reducing investments in North American cars', this likely means GM is taking a hard look at various segments in passenger car segment. With consumers trending towards utility vehicles and trucks, sales of passenger cars have been falling precipitously. As of March 1st, dealers had four month's worth of inventory of cars, compared to an 81-day supply for light trucks and less than 60-days for full-size SUVs. GM could walk away from certain segments such as compacts or full-size sedans, or delay investments in certain models.
      These moves will allow GM to funnel money into models that make more money, and returning capital to shareholders.
      "That's an immediate opportunity for us to reward shareholders without changing the risk profile of the company or our ability to manage through a downturn," GM CFO Chuck Stevens said.
      Analysts are mixed on GM's plans.
      "It takes a lot of discipline to shift away from a volume-is-king kind of mentality," she said. "In the end, that's going to make a better GM -- a longer-standing company that's not only more profitable but more relevant," said Rebecca Lindland, a senior analyst with Kelley Blue Book to Automotive News.
      John Murphy, an analyst with Bank of America Merrill Lynch isn't so sure about this plan.
      "It appears that GM's recent decision-making has become much more short-term-focused and, in our opinion, could create challenges for the company in the coming years," Murphy wrote in a report.
      Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required)
    • By William Maley
      As General Motors begins to close the sale of Opel and Vauxhall to PSA Group, there are questions as to what GM will do in the European market afterwards. According to Automotive News, GM is planning to become a niche brand with selling Cadillac models, along with the Chevrolet Camaro and Corvette.
      “That is the plan at this time, to continue with those models and brands in Europe. We continue to grow the Cadillac brand. We’ll continue to do that in a very disciplined fashion,” said GM CEO Mary Barra on a conference call this morning.
      Cadillac has been trying to make end roads into Europe for a decade with middling success. Last year, Cadillac's 45 dealers in Europe (mostly in Germany and Switzerland) sold 781 vehicles, up 33 percent when compared to 2015. The brand has the goal of selling 5,000 vehicles yearly in Europe by the end of this decade. This includes sales of the Camaro and Corvette which are doing much better - more than 1,800 models sold last year. 
      Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required)

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