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    William Maley

    Infiniti To Become Electrified Brand for Nissan

      Another automaker joins the electrification train

    After 2021, most of Infiniti's lineup will feature some sort of electrification. That's the word from Nissan CEO Hiroto Saikawa speaking this week at the Automotive News World Congress. All new models will either use fully-electric powertrains or use Nissan's ePower setup - similar to the Chevrolet Volt's powertrain where a small gas engine acts only as a generator for the battery. The only model that will be excluded from this plan is the full-size QX80 SUV. Infiniti also announced their first electric vehicle would launch in 2021.

    Infiniti is the latest automaker to announce plans to electrify their lineup. The likes of Volvo and Jaguar Land Rover announced similar plans last year.

    This brings up the question as to what will happen to Infiniti's new VC Turbo engine. Executives emphasized that the engine is seen as a bridge between gas engines to electrifications. Saikawa didn't say what would happen to the VC Turbo engine after 2021. 

    Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required)

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