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    2013 Volkswagen Jetta Hybrid


    William Maley

    Staff Writer - CheersandGears.com

    August 28, 2013

    "Why is Volkswagen doing a hybrid version of the Jetta?!"

    That was my response when the news first came that Volkswagen would be introducing the Jetta Hybrid. On one hand this doesn't make sense. Volkswagen is known as the diesel automaker with five vehicles that offer amazing fuel economy and performance. Plus, diesel vehicles in the U.S. are making huge inroads. According to R.L. Polk, registration of diesel vehicles have increased 24.3 percent from 2010 to 2012.

    However there are still a fair number of the public who believe that diesel is EVIL! Instead they are turning to hybrids which also offers amazing fuel economy numbers. Volkswagen not wanting to miss out on this has created the Jetta Hybrid. But this being Volkswagen, they did it their way. In this case, you'll find a turbocharged engine, dual-clutch gearbox, and promises of fun to driveness. Does it fully work?

    The Jetta Hybrid's design is very much a Jetta. That's to say the current incarnation is very conservative. You'll find crisp lines and a tailored rear end as its distinctive design cues. Some believe the design will age well in the coming years. I agree with that, but is that something you should be proud of in a design?

    gallery_10485_682_1336059.jpg

    There are little giveaways that help differentiate the Jetta Hybrid from a normal Jetta, but you're going to have to get close to notice them. There is a new grille and small spoiler in a effort to improve aerodynamics. Other changes include LED taillights, new wheels, and a number of 'hybrid' badges on the vehicle.

    Moving inside, it's hard to tell the difference between a normal Jetta and Jetta Hybrid. The only real giveaway that you're in the Hybrid is a new gauge cluster that replaces the tachometer with an Eco/Power/Charge gauge that makes no sense. Sure it will tell you how aggressive you are on the throttle, but it's not tied to something quantifiable. Stick with the trip computer in the gauge cluster that provides a screen that shows which powertrain is working if you want to maximize your MPGs.

    Much like the exterior, the Jetta Hybrid's interior design is plain. Material quality is pretty poor as the door panels and lower trim pieces are hard plastics that look like they came from milk crates. This is a huge no-no on a vehicle with a $30k+ pricetag. The only real bright spots inside were a soft touch dash and aluminum-like trim pieces.

    gallery_10485_682_1137410.jpg

    Another downside to the Jetta Hybrid is the infotainment system. Volkswagen uses a small five-inch touch screen that provides radio, navigation, and information about the hybrid system. While I liked the simple navigation interface and the screens showing the important hybrid information, the rest of the system is not great. The touch points on the screen are too small and I found myself repeatedly hitting them to get something to happen. You also can't pan from one part of the map to another which I found somewhat annoying. Finally, I don't like that Volkswagen uses this small screen in a number of their high-end compact vehicles (Jetta Hybrid, GLI, GTI, and Beetle Turbo). I would be willing to shell out a few more dollars just so I can have a larger screen.

    Not all is bad with the Jetta Hybrid's interior. To start, the Jetta Hybrid has one of the largest interiors in the compact class. That means you and your passengers will be able to find a comfortable position in the vehicle. There is also the excellent Fender audio system which pumped out some great sound. I originally thought this would be just a stick-on name to a mediocre sound system, but I was wrong.

    The heart of the Jetta Hybrid is 1.4L turbocharged four-cylinder, paired with a 20kW electric motor. Total output stands at 170 horsepower and 184 pound-feet of torque. A 220-volt, 60-cell lithium-ion battery pack helps power the electric motor. Volkswagen uses their seven-speed DSG transmission to send the power to front wheels.

    gallery_10485_682_119658.jpg

    The hybrid powertrain provides a surprising punch of power. The 1.4L turbo engine shows little lag and paired with the electric motor, provides smooth acceleration no matter the occasion. The smooth shifting DSG is lightning quick with its gear changes. At low speeds or if you are gentle on the throttle, the Jetta Hybrid will run on the electric motor alone for a time up to 37 MPH. You can also engage E-Mode which turns the engine off and lets you use the electric motor only. I found myself turning on E-Mode when entering my neighborhood to save more gas.

    The one complaint I'll level at the powertrain is when I'm leaving a stop. The powertrain goes through a shuddering stage as the computer works out which mode it should go into. Volkswagen still has some bugs to work out.

    Fuel economy is rated at 42 City/48 Highway/45 Combined. During my week, I got an average 40.1 MPG in mixed driving. This is a vehicle where you have to learn how to drive it correctly if you want to attain high MPG numbers.

    Fun to drive isn't something you would expect of a hybrid, but the Jetta Hybrid is that. Borrowing the suspension from the Jetta GLI, the Hybrid is engaging on a nice curvy road. It's a shame I can't say the same about the Hybrid's steering which is light and not very good at communicating the road to the driver. On the flip side, the suspension is very competent on providing a comfortable and smooth ride. The steering makes it a breeze of navigating tight parking spots and the city.

    gallery_10485_682_464509.jpg

    The big question when talking about hybrids is 'how are the brakes?' The Jetta Hybrid is much like any other hybrid; the brakes are very grabby. Weirdly, I found the pedal would offer some brake feel sometimes and there would be none other times. This is something I believe Volkswagen should go back to the drawing board on.

    The Jetta Hybrid leaves me in a bit of a quandary. On one hand the Jetta Hybrid is packs a nice punch of power from the hybrid powertrain and is very competent when you want to have some fun. But the fuel economy, interior material quality, and as-tested pricetag give me hesitation. Factor in the similar fuel economy and lower pricetag of the Jetta TDI and the Jetta Hybrid becomes a bit tougher to argue.

    In summary: If you want the best hybrid, go with the Prius. If you want the most fuel economy in the Volkswagen family and something fun, go with the Jetta TDI. The Jetta Hybrid just cannot make a very compelling argument.

    gallery_10485_682_1236180.jpg

    Disclaimer: Volkswagen provided the Jetta Hybrid, insurance, and one tank of gas.

    Year: 2013

    Make: Volkswagen

    Model: Jetta Hybrid

    Trim: SEL Premium

    Engine: 1.4L Turbocharged and Intercooled Inline Four-Cylinder, Electric Motor

    Driveline: Front-Wheel Drive, Seven-Speed DSG Transmission

    Horsepower @ RPM: (Gas) 150 @ 5,000; (Electric) 27 @ 0; (Combined) 170 @ 5,000

    Torque @ RPM: (Gas) 184 @ 1,600; (Electric) 114 @ 0; (Combined) 184 @ 1,000

    Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 42/48/45

    Curb Weight: 3,312 lbs

    Location of Manufacture: Puebla, Mexico

    Base Price: $31,180.00

    As Tested Price: $32,010.00* (Includes $795.00 destination charge)

    Options:

    First Aid Kit - $35.00

    William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.

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    William, good job. You are improving as a reporter.

    Now time for you to go and get some seat time in a race setting to start pushing these vehicles to the limit as you test them.. :)

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    I would have expected vw to throw a twist on this and bring out a diesel hybrid. That seems to be a development that would produce killer fuel economy.

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    William, good job. You are improving as a reporter.

    Now time for you to go and get some seat time in a race setting to start pushing these vehicles to the limit as you test them.. :)

    Thanks Z, means a lot to me.

    As for the other thing.. I need to do a few things before I attempt that.

    I would have expected vw to throw a twist on this and bring out a diesel hybrid. That seems to be a development that would produce killer fuel economy.

    The big problem with Diesel-Hybrid vehicles at the moment is how expensive they are to build. The tech is there, the costs just need to fall down.

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    Nice write up William. I agree with Z that you really are improving on your reviews.

    Comment/observation is that people complain about the Impala steering wheel and this one is freaking plain Ugly and talk about a BORING INTERIOR! Amazing the comments on the Impala thread and yet no one here even mentions just how blah /Ugly this interior is.

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    Ever met an exciting interior in ANY German car? I don't think so. Also, at least the Jetta steering wheel does not look misshaped like the '14 Impala steering wheel.

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    Nice review!

    Did you get a photo of the trunk? I like to see how the battery compromised it in sedan hybrid conversions.

    I didn't unfortunately. I can say the battery pack does take up about quarter to a third of the trunk space.

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    Wow. I'm not much of a Volkswagen fan, but I have to say that this Jetta is looking pretty decent. However, I have to agree that the interior does seems rather lacking in quality, especially for something of that value.

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    Very good review. That Volkswagen is calling my name, though! It looks very good for someone like me who isn't all that into Volkswagens to be honest. I am impressed. The interior is decent, but it appears comfortable. Plus, the rims are nice. Not shabby.

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