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  • William Maley
    William Maley

    Quick Drive: 2018 Alfa Romeo Giulia Ti Sport Q4

      After having a bit of dessert (Quadrifoglio), we decide to have the veggies

    It seems a bit odd to be driving the Giulia Ti almost half a year on from spending a week high-performance Quadrifoglio. This felt like I had a nice slice of cake and was now facing a bowl of vegetables. Trying to keep an open mind on Ti was going to be difficult, considering the mixed opinions I had with the first Giulia. But I knew that I had to try.

    • I actually prefer the toned-down nature of Ti Sport compared to Quadrifoglio as lacks the aggressive bumper treatment and cloverleaf emblems on the fenders. Some items such as the uniquely styled wheels do carry over and add a small sporting touch.
    • The only item I would change is the color. Grey just makes the design somewhat boring. The blue I had on the Quadrifoglio works much better as it allows the design to stand out.
    • The interior is still very much a mixed affair. Most of the materials are what you would expect to find a luxury car of this caliber with soft-touch plastics, leather, and metal trim. But Alfa clearly cut some corners such as the cheap plastics used on the center console. The front sport seats provide excellent bolstering and comfort for any adventure you decide to take. Rear space is almost non-existent for most adults.
    • Alfa Romeo did address one of my complaints with that I had with 2017 Giulia. 2018 models now have the option of Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. It is shame that it is an option, but it does make using infotainment system somewhat less frustrating.
    • Some of the issues I had with the system in both the Giulia Quadrifoglio and Stelvio Ti are present in this Giulia. Going through a number of menus to accomplish simple tasks, slow performance, and a small number of crashes during my weeklong test. I really hope Alfa Romeo is working on some updates to get this system in order.
    • Power comes from a turbocharged 2.0L four-cylinder delivering 280 horsepower and 306 pound-feet of torque. This is paired with an eight-speed automatic and optional Q4 all-wheel drive.
    • I really liked this engine in the Stevlio as moved the compact crossover without breaking a sweat. In the Giulia, this engine makes this sedan fly away from stops. It is said the turbo-four can hit 60 mph in just over five seconds, which is fast for the class. One disappointment is the engine sounding like a diesel at idle, not something you want to have in an Italian sport sedan.
    • EPA says the Giulia Ti with AWD will return 23 City/31 Highway/26 Combined. My average for the week landed around 23.6 in mostly city driving.
    • One trait that both the Ti Sport and Quadrifoglio share is the handling. The chassis underneath allows the Giulia to dart around in the corners and keep body motions well in check. Steering is another bright spot where the vehicle would instantly respond to any input, along with provide good feedback.
    • Ride quality is slightly better than the Quadrifoglio as only a small number of bumps come inside. Put the Giulia into Dynamic (sport mode) and the ride does become somewhat unbearable.
    • Unfortunately, my Giulia Ti tester had an issue with the brakes. Whenever the brakes were applied, there was a noticeable screeching noise coming the rear of the vehicle. At first, I thought something had gotten lodged in the brakes. But the noise would go away after I had been driving for a bit. Park the car for awhile and drive it once again, the noise would return. This likely hints at something being warped - a bit disappointing for a vehicle that only had a few thousand miles on the odometer.
    • The Giulia is one of those vehicles I really want to like a lot more than I currently do. Alfa Romeo still has a number of issues they need to address sooner than later. I only would recommend this model for those who understand what they’re getting into.

    Gallery: 2018 Alfa Romeo Giulia Ti Sport Q4

    Disclaimer: Alfa Romeo Provided the Giulia, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas

    Year: 2018
    Make: Alfa Romeo
    Model: Giulia
    Trim: Ti Sport Q4
    Engine: 2.0L Turbocharged MultiAir SOHC Inline-Four
    Driveline: Eight-Speed Automatic, All-Wheel Drive
    Horsepower @ RPM: 280 @ 5,200
    Torque @ RPM: 306 @ 2,000 - 4,800
    Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 23/31/26
    Curb Weight: N/A
    Location of Manufacture: Cassino, Italy
    Base Price: $41,995
    As Tested Price: $51,885 (Includes $1,295 Destination Charge)

    Options:
    Ti Sport AWD Package 22S - $2,500.00
    Driver Assist Dynamic Plus Package - $1,500.00
    Ti Leather Package - $995.00
    8.8-inch AM/FM Bluetooth Radio with 3D Nav - $950.00
    Harman/Kardon Premium Audio System - $900.00
    Driver Assistance Static Package - $650.00
    Vesuvio Gray Metallic - $600.00
    19-inch x 8-inch Bright 5-Hole Aluminum Wheels - $500.00

    Edited by William Maley



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    This is a car that everyone seems to get excited about except me.  I liked the old 159, it had character, but these I find to be just so anonymous.  The interiors are nothing to write home about either. 

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    I like the sounds the Quadrifoglio makes.  The V6 on this is awesome.  Ferrari engine tuners really know how to make an engine sing. 

     The Guilia's silhouette has a lot in common with a BMW 3 Series.  And it does not help the situation when BMW 3 Series cars have looked the same since about 10 years now.  This might explain some of the blandness. 

    I do think the Guilia is sexy enough, but maybe the glorious sounds of its V6 have me blinded with how sexy it might really be in the looks department. 

    Edited by oldshurst442
    adjusted my opinion
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    I seldom like modern car's wheels, but I do like these a bunch.
    On the other hand, except for the Edsel-esque grille opening, the entire exterior is about an anonymous as they come. In profile or from the rear, it could be ANYTHING. Interior also feels dated to me.

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    :puke: The bland styling of this auto and the terrible front nose just make it a puke fest for me. Pass, I see nothing inside or out that would make this an exciting auto to own.

    While I would never own a German auto, I would take a German auto over any of the over rated garbage Italians make.

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    On 12/27/2018 at 11:22 PM, dfelt said:

    :puke: The bland styling of this auto and the terrible front nose just make it a puke fest for me. Pass, I see nothing inside or out that would make this an exciting auto to own.

    While I would never own a German auto, I would take a German auto over any of the over rated garbage Italians make.

    Please be more direct and let us know how you really feel.

    On 12/27/2018 at 8:40 PM, balthazar said:

    I seldom like modern car's wheels, but I do like these a bunch.
    On the other hand, except for the Edsel-esque grille opening, the entire exterior is about an anonymous as they come. In profile or from the rear, it could be ANYTHING. Interior also feels dated to me.

    I really kind of agree with you. Cadillac's designs seem much more fresh and vibrant.

    On 12/27/2018 at 11:46 AM, Drew Dowdell said:

    This is a car that everyone seems to get excited about except me.  I liked the old 159, it had character, but these I find to be just so anonymous.  The interiors are nothing to write home about either. 

    I like elements of it, but overall I can do a lot better for the money. CPO CTS-V is calling my name....

    On 12/27/2018 at 8:12 PM, oldshurst442 said:

    I like the sounds the Quadrifoglio makes.  The V6 on this is awesome.  Ferrari engine tuners really know how to make an engine sing. 

     The Guilia's silhouette has a lot in common with a BMW 3 Series.  And it does not help the situation when BMW 3 Series cars have looked the same since about 10 years now.  This might explain some of the blandness. 

    I do think the Guilia is sexy enough, but maybe the glorious sounds of its V6 have me blinded with how sexy it might really be in the looks department. 

    The car in question is the four without the glorious six...you still feel a rise in your pants when you look at this, Skippy?

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    2 hours ago, A Horse With No Name said:

     

    The car in question is the four without the glorious six...you still feel a rise in your pants when you look at this, Skippy?

    LOL!!!

    Skippy?

    Ive been called and nicknamed many things over the course of my 45 years on this planet, Skippy was never one of them.  Its a first for me.

    Skippy...

    Image result for Skippy Family ties\ 
    Nerdy, yet cute, but invisible to Mallory because not Alpha male. He probably became a billionaire by creating a techie company start-up in Silicone Valley and is having the last laugh as Mallory probably is divorced with 2-3-4 kids living in a trailer park because she chose a Nick type  ignoramus...(Nick was lovable though)
     
    Yeah...Im not seeing Skippy in me. 
    Back to the Giulia.  Yeah, had I understood the 4 cylinder part a tad better and not been blinded and biased towards that Ferrari engineered and tuned V6 , I would have not referenced it in the first place.
    So I kinda feel like Nick at this point in time. 
    Related image
     
    Without the earring of course.  
     
    PS: I was always more like...no, not an Alex P. Keaton type, but another Michael J. Fox character.
    Like Marty McFly.
    Nerdy, yet cool.
    Cute, but not a hunky beef steak.
    Calm yet jumpy. 
    Sporty and athletic but clumsy at the same time. 
    Shy  and introverted yet rock-n-rolly and arrogantly loud. 
    laisser faire but aggressive
     
    That is why I love Oldsmobiles.  They capture me perfectly.  Sporty and classy.  Not  too sporty like Pontiac. Not everyday man's Chevy. Not 1%er Cadillac and not a Doctor's or Lawyer's professional job Buick.  But Oldsmobile. 
    A bottom end Olds could be bought by an everyday blue collar man if he was a hard working soul and played his cards right. 
    A muscle car 442 could be as sporty as a Pontiac.
    A high end 88/Delta 88/Super 88 and the like could be a professional's ride. It could also be bought by a 1%er that wanted to stay stealthy and not advertise. 
     
    The Giulia and BMW and Acura and Buick after Olds went away, want to play in that former Olds playground. 
    Apart from BMW, all others have failed. Even BMW is faltering somewhat.  Audi has success, but they too are becoming what Olds became in the late 1980s to early 1990s. 
    What is amazing with Oldsmobile, they kept that high image for a good 80 years straight. Lost it but kinda regained again just before GM pulled the plug on them. 
     
    Back to the Giulia.  The a ONLY redeeming quality it has is that V6. And the suspension set-up on it that out does BMW. But Im not so sure people care for an ultimate driving BMW-like experience anymore.  
    In the 1990s, this car would most have definitely have dethroned BMW and would have stolen market share from BMW 3 series buyers.  Not so much in 2018.  
    OOPSIES.  2019.  Another Nick moment. 
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Edited by oldshurst442
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    The problem I see with the Giulia is that FCA, if they truly want Alfa Romeo to build on this.... will have to keep this car fresh every 5-6 years. They won't get away with letting cars get old like the LX's, or the long in tooth (but worth it) product cycle of the RAM's...

     

    I also think that Alfa Romeo with its new focus for luxury and sport, like most Italian brands of sports cars and exotics.... is incompatible with electric power-trains.

    Hybrids maybe, but full electric... There's no point.  Imagine a world many years from now... where the electric version is the regular model and the high performance model still has an internal combustion engine, and you'll pay a gas guzzler tax on top of that... 

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    54 minutes ago, Suaviloquent said:

    The problem I see with the Giulia is that FCA, if they truly want Alfa Romeo to build on this.... will have to keep this car fresh every 5-6 years. They won't get away with letting cars get old like the LX's, or the long in tooth (but worth it) product cycle of the RAM's...

     

    I also think that Alfa Romeo with its new focus for luxury and sport, like most Italian brands of sports cars and exotics.... is incompatible with electric power-trains.

    Hybrids maybe, but full electric... There's no point.  Imagine a world many years from now... where the electric version is the regular model and the high performance model still has an internal combustion engine, and you'll pay a gas guzzler tax on top of that... 

    I think the day of full electrics is a good bit off.

    And yes...in many ways FCA is their own worst enemy.

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    The market has a 'sporty Italian' brand with Maserati- doesn't seem to find many takers.
    It remains to be seen if A-R brings enough fresh to the table to sustain itself. I think they should take a risk with their designs and try & stand out some.

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    11 hours ago, balthazar said:

    The market has a 'sporty Italian' brand with Maserati- doesn't seem to find many takers.
    It remains to be seen if A-R brings enough fresh to the table to sustain itself. I think they should take a risk with their designs and try & stand out some.

    I agree. Although I like this design better than say the sport sedans of Acura and infinity...taking risks for them did not pay off at all.

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    I would still be worried about the issues they keep having...simply not a good thing!

    Still not a the Luxo level to play with the others.....

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    2 hours ago, daves87rs said:

    I would still be worried about the issues they keep having...simply not a good thing!

    Still not a the Luxo level to play with the others.....

    They are being consistent with the long-established Italian luxury or sporty image, though...looks great, drives great, but poor reliability and quality.  

    Edited by Robert Hall
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    13 hours ago, Robert Hall said:

    They are being consistent with the long-established Italian luxury or sporty image, though...looks great, drives great, but poor reliability and quality.  

    Very true...and fun to drive is what will help them out.

    Catch is they can’t enjoy it while it’s being worked on....

    That said, I hope they do improve them for us to enjoy....

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