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Oracle of Delphi

Number plate recognition police cars deployed in SA

43 posts in this topic

September 23, 2009 by Alborz Fallah

As part of a trial for an interesting new system, South Australian police have begun using patrol cars fitted with a camera system capable of instantly reading and analysing number plates of cars driving past.

The Automated Number Plate Recognition camera system will automatically run the number plate of cars through its system and tell the police whether a car is unroadworthy, unregistered, uninsured, or stolen

The idea is to take the element of random checking out and have all cars passing by checked allowing police to better catch law offenders. Additionally the technology can be used to catch criminals by linking known offenders to certain number plates that were spotted in crime scenes.

“As a vehicle licence plate is read by the camera, the image is displayed on an LCD screen visible to police officers and an audible tone alerts police if a registration number plate matches a vehicle of interest,” Assistant Commissioner Killmier said.

The system can read up to 700 license plates per hour and as a vehicle licence plate is read by the camera an audible tone alerts police if the number plate is flagged for any reason.

Whole Article here: http://www.caradvice.com.au/42170/number-p...deployed-in-sa/

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I think I saw something like this in the A&E show "parking wars" but the technology required the van to drive quite slow to help spot parking violators.

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I think I saw something like this in the A&E show "parking wars" but the technology required the van to drive quite slow to help spot parking violators.

The repo man has them as well:

Of course, it’s not always that easy. “A guy who’s missed eight or nine payments, well, he knows we’re comin’,” says Ferarolis. “So he tries to hide his car. He’ll park it four blocks from his house, swap cars with a friend, stash it in a relative’s drive, paint it, even park it near a bus stop—he’ll ride a bus a few blocks just to pick up his car.”

To locate such hidden assets, AIR attaches a $7500 pair of infrared cameras on each of three cars and two tow trucks. The cameras face left and right and read license plates on parked cars—about 300 per hour. “We drive in ever-widening circles around a guy’s neighborhood,” says Ferarolis. “We’ll cruise down alleys, through apartment complexes, up and down the rows of cars at the nearest mall.” When the camera reads a plate that’s an “assignment,” a computer riding in the passenger seat goes, “ka-ching!”

http://www.caranddriver.com/features/09q2/...t_me._22_page_2

State of the Repo Art: The Jerr-Dan Element

Gone in 8 seconds: Behind on your car payments? Well, kiss your assets good-bye.

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Portuguese police started using this as well. It can instantly match plate numbers whose owners/drivers have large backlogs of unpaid traffic tickets, for example.

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Only 700/hr?

Considering that a freeway has a maximum capacity of 2000 cars/lane/hr, this technology isn't quite ready for primetime in the states.

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Only 700/hr?

Considering that a freeway has a maximum capacity of 2000 cars/lane/hr, this technology isn't quite ready for primetime in the states.

700 is still a lot of cars. A lot more than the officer can check manually.

Unless the system fails if there are more cars on the road than that. Then yeah, that would be useless on city highways.

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I saw it in Boston this past weekend. The cop just sits parked with 2 box things on the trunk and watches the laptop.

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Speaking of number plates, I've seen several cars lately with strange plastic plate covers that are very difficult to read the # through, they distort the view of the plate, esp. when seen from an angle. I would think those would be illegal, makes it harder for speed cameras to catch the #.

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Speaking of number plates, I've seen several cars lately with strange plastic plate covers that are very difficult to read the # through, they distort the view of the plate, esp. when seen from an angle. I would think those would be illegal, makes it harder for speed cameras to catch the #.

Its sort of a Fresnel lens... they are exactly made for defeating speed and red light cameras. In many states its illegal to put ANY covering, clear or not, over the actual numbers... some states are cracking down on plate surrounds, as well.

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Its sort of a Fresnel lens... they are exactly made for defeating speed and red light cameras. In many states its illegal to put ANY covering, clear or not, over the actual numbers... some states are cracking down on plate surrounds, as well.

Yeah, they have a new law here about license plate frames that cover the state name. I left off my U. of Michigan plate frame that I used in Colorado, since 'Arizona' at the top of the plate gets covered with 'M GO BLUE'... :)

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Its sort of a Fresnel lens... they are exactly made for defeating speed and red light cameras. In many states its illegal to put ANY covering, clear or not, over the actual numbers... some states are cracking down on plate surrounds, as well.

Mythbusters ran an episode where they tried a bunch of different covers to defeat the camera. None of them worked. The one you guys are talking about might work, but not if it's one of the ones from that episode.

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More big brother.

I don't know why it's called 'Big Brother' when, really, it's just a more efficient means to do a job; not to mention protect private property, whether vehicles or just plates from falling to the wrong hands. Why is it such a bad thing to have something other than an officer's eyeballs scoping out for bad things?

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Mythbusters ran an episode where they tried a bunch of different covers to defeat the camera. None of them worked. The one you guys are talking about might work, but not if it's one of the ones from that episode.

Oh, sorry, I didn't mean to imply that I believed they worked... only that thats why they are selling them and that the legislators feel its creditable enough to outlaw.

Yeah, though covers, the spray on blockers and the pheromones for sale in the back of auto magazines are all snake oil.

Some people put them on to keep their plate clean... yeah... then the UV turns them translucent... its a wonder they don't get pulled over.

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I don't know why it's called 'Big Brother' when, really, it's just a more efficient means to do a job; not to mention protect private property, whether vehicles or just plates from falling to the wrong hands. Why is it such a bad thing to have something other than an officer's eyeballs scoping out for bad things?

Because it makes a mockery of "private" property. Each of these "advances" erodes freedom a bit more, so I oppose them all.

Unlike so many these days, the thing I want most from the authorites is that they leave me alone.

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Because it makes a mockery of "private" property. Each of these "advances" erodes freedom a bit more, so I oppose them all.

Unlike so many these days, the thing I want most from the authorites is that they leave me alone.

As they say, if you aren't doing anything illegal, you have nothing to worry about, right? :)

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As they say, if you aren't doing anything illegal, you have nothing to worry about, right? :)

Ah, the fallback excuse of authoritarians.

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Ah, the fallback excuse of authoritarians.

Then you will love VeriChip. This company apparently has a patent on implantable chips for humans. Just think of the uses--they could be used for tracking and monitoring people, remotely vaccinating people, etc. Lots of possibilities here. Their stock has gone up sharply lately.

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Then you will love VeriChip. This company apparently has a patent on implantable chips for humans. Just think of the uses--they could be used for tracking and monitoring people, remotely vaccinating people, etc. Lots of possibilities here. Their stock has gone up sharply lately.

Figures.

The sheeple will consent to anything.

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Ah, the fallback excuse of authoritarians.

When the company introduced GPS systems in the plumbing division's vans, the plumbers thought it was a cool idea to help them locate their assignments faster. They later learned through the reprimand of a few crewmen that they got more than they bargained for because the same system was utilized to check on the locations of the vans at any given time. It turned out some of the crewmen were using the vans on the weekend for personal use, charging fuel to the company; also on a few a occasions to stop off at "unapproved locations", such as "the liquor store" during work hours.

So in the case of preventing time and fuel theft, I'd say this kind of equipment has its place.

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When the company introduced GPS systems in the plumbing division's vans, the plumbers thought it was a cool idea to help them locate their assignments faster. They later learned through the reprimand of a few crewmen that they got more than they bargained for because the same system was utilized to check on the locations of the vans at any given time. It turned out some of the crewmen were using the vans on the weekend for personal use, charging fuel to the company; also on a few a occasions to stop off at "unapproved locations", such as "the liquor store" during work hours.

So in the case of preventing time and fuel theft, I'd say this kind of equipment has its place.

In some cases, and with informed consent, perhaps.

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Because it makes a mockery of "private" property. Each of these "advances" erodes freedom a bit more, so I oppose them all.

Unlike so many these days, the thing I want most from the authorites is that they leave me alone.

It's not really "private" property unless it's fully paid for, apparently. The repo man and tow truck companies have been using these for years.

Edited by pow
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It's not really "private" property unless it's fully paid for, apparently. The repo man and tow truck companies have been using these for years.

It doesn't matter if the driver owns it, or the bank does, it is still private.

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