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El Kabong

C/D Tests Lincoln MKC: "A Competent Pod"

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"There’s a lot of mixing and matching of powertrains and platforms between mainstream and premium divisions these days as market segments get sliced ever thinner. But the skill with which different carmakers blend the componentry varies. Which begs the question: Is the new MKC 'premium' enough to be a Lincoln? That, of course, depends upon one’s expectations."

...and the conclusion, after doing a thorough review at this link:

http://m.caranddriver.com/reviews/2015-lincoln-mkc-20t-fwd-test-review

"It does present an opportunity for Lincoln to avoid losing some of its current buyers to other premium brands." Which is an odd goal for a segment-busting product-don't you normally hope for conquest sales rather than trying to retain customers fleeing your other products? So strange.

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Lincoln's like a daily newspaper - dependably disposable and old news by the time it's off the production line. 

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See, if I wrote that then a certain someone would have soiled their diaper in a frothy-mouthed rage. But you did so it passes muster.

Still 100% true tho :(

Edited by El Kabong
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Thank you for calling it an "MXC" in your title.  :AH-HA:

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Is EVERY SINGLE PRODUCTION AUTO going to feature the same conceptual 4-spoke steering wheel ? Has this been federally mandated and I missed the update??

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I like the MKC, but with the 2.3T. In the same way I like the MKZ but only with the V6. The 7+ second 0-60 sprint and mid-15 quarter mile times just leave so much to be desired in the $35-40k price point. I thing they're both very strong in design terms in the luxury class. Much better than Acura. And the push button transmission is infinitely better in Lincolns than Hondas and Acuras.

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The most damning part of the article for me was the discussion about the suspension: "What saves the MKC is... its Escape DNA. Lincoln’s new compact SUV puts a fork in the brand’s previous legacy of offering filigreed Fords with soft suspensions. Where previous Lincolns floated, the MKC’s dynamics are buttoned down."

When your "luxury" brand's suspension tuning is so out to lunch that your base brand is the preferred starting point?... you know things are bad.

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Is it really so hard to make a high quality interior for the price point. I mean Ford did it withe the Focus.

That interior below is no Escape or Focus.

 

And meh on the article.  They picked apart not having enough power and an interior like a Lexus or Audi, yet reviewed a FWD 2.0L, not the much more powerful 2.3L with AWD and certainly not the Black Label trim, which is much more luxurious than the picture below.

 

 

 

2015-lincoln-mkc-interior.jpg

Edited by Wings4Life

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They were quite clear in the article about the options driving the price unacceptably high. Can't imagine that package would make the matter any better, to say the least.

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^

And I can't imagine you would admit to the obvious.

 

Clearly, their complaints were focused on interior luxury levels and adequate power differentiation from the Escape.

The much more powerful engine option.....combined with AWD.......combined with a premium trim option that focuses on interior materials and luxury appointments would clearly address their 'Con' list.

 

And yeah, a technology package combine with a massive sunroof, jacks the price on ALL vehicles.  Assuming they offer them.

 

Regardless, Lincoln recognized the trend for CUV, and the MKX (shown below) is hitting dealers in a few weeks and is the 2nd of 3 major luxury CUV's that will feed that trend.  The Aviator will launch shortly after the all new aluminum Navigator, replacing the style challenged MKT.  So in total, I think Lincoln will supporting the needs of it's customers, while the competition still tries to figure it all out.

 

2015-lincoln-mkc-black-label-indulgence-

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The most damning part of the article for me was the discussion about the suspension: "What saves the MKC is... its Escape DNA. Lincoln’s new compact SUV puts a fork in the brand’s previous legacy of offering filigreed Fords with soft suspensions. Where previous Lincolns floated, the MKC’s dynamics are buttoned down."

When your "luxury" brand's suspension tuning is so out to lunch that your base brand is the preferred starting point?... you know things are bad.

 

Actually, it's because the Escape is so good, especially at its price point, that it makes an excellent starting point for the lux model.   So, why not start with a tune that already punches above its weight and gets nearly universal great reviews?  I don't have a problem with it. 

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Is it really so hard to make a high quality interior for the price point. I mean Ford did it withe the Focus.

That interior below is no Escape or Focus.

 

And meh on the article.  They picked apart not having enough power and an interior like a Lexus or Audi, yet reviewed a FWD 2.0L, not the much more powerful 2.3L with AWD and certainly not the Black Label trim, which is much more luxurious than the picture below.

 

 

 

2015-lincoln-mkc-interior.jpg

 

 

I think that the MKC is priced a little high for the segment it wants to compete in, but I wouldn't rate the interior as bad.   The thing that completely kills the MKC for me is the Sync system.... I find it so terrible to use that I won't even rent Fords with it anymore.   It's unfortunate, because my partner and I are the target customer for the MKC as we currently have an Encore and want to move up in size just a little with the next vehicle. 

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^

 

Sync III is launching as we speak.

I hear that is very much improved. We shall see.

 

 

So here's an issue I have.... Why wouldn't it be launching on a Lincoln?  Lincoln, being the premium brand in the portfolio, should get it first.... not the bottom car in the "people's brand".

I fixed the topic title. 

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So your beef with the infotainment is the same as mine with the suspension tuning: Ford Motor Company is a Ford-centric organization. And if you want to go down that path then there will be consequences. In this case it's seeing all your other brands fall by the wayside over the years, including your luxury one, because you cannot/do not do right by their brand mission.

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^

 

Sync III is launching as we speak.

I hear that is very much improved. We shall see.

 

 

So here's an issue I have.... Why wouldn't it be launching on a Lincoln?  Lincoln, being the premium brand in the portfolio, should get it first.... not the bottom car in the "people's brand".

I fixed the topic title. 

 

Not really sure there.  Perhaps it has something to do with rolling out to the masses that complained the most.  And honestly, they are co-developed anyway, so the launch is effectively same time frame, relative to next product launching that has been aligned with it.  It's not exactly new tech that will draw customers.  It is just an upgrade.  A well deserved one that is.

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Is EVERY SINGLE PRODUCTION AUTO going to feature the same conceptual 4-spoke steering wheel ? Has this been federally mandated and I missed the update??

A standardized design under the trim makes it simpler for a few suppliers to provide them.

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So your beef with the infotainment is the same as mine with the suspension tuning: Ford Motor Company is a Ford-centric organization. And if you want to go down that path then there will be consequences. In this case it's seeing all your other brands fall by the wayside over the years, including your luxury one, because you cannot/do not do right by their brand mission.

 

Similar, but not the same.  I have no problem with Lincoln borrowing from an excellent (probably class leading in this particular attribute) Ford product.   I'd have no problem with Lincoln taking the Mustang architecture and stretching it into a Mark IX coupe as long as it got it's own look, because as a chassis, the Mustang is a great product. 

 

The current Sync system is terribly out of date compared with other systems. Sync is a negative attribute instead of a positive one like the Escape suspension tuning.  As such, it should either be a simultaneous, corporate-wide rollout of the new version, or it should go to Lincoln first and then filter to the rest. 

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So your beef with the infotainment is the same as mine with the suspension tuning: Ford Motor Company is a Ford-centric organization. And if you want to go down that path then there will be consequences. In this case it's seeing all your other brands fall by the wayside over the years, including your luxury one, because you cannot/do not do right by their brand mission.

 

Similar, but not the same.  I have no problem with Lincoln borrowing from an excellent (probably class leading in this particular attribute) Ford product.   I'd have no problem with Lincoln taking the Mustang architecture and stretching it into a Mark IX coupe as long as it got it's own look, because as a chassis, the Mustang is a great product. 

 

The current Sync system is terribly out of date compared with other systems. Sync is a negative attribute instead of a positive one like the Escape suspension tuning.  As such, it should either be a simultaneous, corporate-wide rollout of the new version, or it should go to Lincoln first and then filter to the rest. 

 

This is an interesting dilemma.

 

1. Should Ford hold off roll out of sync3, which appears to have been worked on exclusively of any specific vehicle launches, to instead wait for any new Lincoln launch that aligns with syn3 development...which in this case would be either the Conti or all new Navi....

2. .....or does Ford launch it first with their volume cash cow brand which will obviously generate far more benefit to the entire corporation?

 

It seems the almighty $$$ won on this one.  Holding off until Lincoln could launch what is essentially a co-developed upgrade, seems to have had not enough weighted advantage overall.

 

I guess I agree then.  The masses win.

Edited by Wings4Life

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So your beef with the infotainment is the same as mine with the suspension tuning: Ford Motor Company is a Ford-centric organization. And if you want to go down that path then there will be consequences. In this case it's seeing all your other brands fall by the wayside over the years, including your luxury one, because you cannot/do not do right by their brand mission.

 

Similar, but not the same.  I have no problem with Lincoln borrowing from an excellent (probably class leading in this particular attribute) Ford product.   I'd have no problem with Lincoln taking the Mustang architecture and stretching it into a Mark IX coupe as long as it got it's own look, because as a chassis, the Mustang is a great product. 

 

The current Sync system is terribly out of date compared with other systems. Sync is a negative attribute instead of a positive one like the Escape suspension tuning.  As such, it should either be a simultaneous, corporate-wide rollout of the new version, or it should go to Lincoln first and then filter to the rest. 

 

This is an interesting dilemma.

 

1. Should Ford hold off roll out of sync3, which appears to have been worked on exclusively of any specific vehicle launches, to instead wait for any new Lincoln launch that aligns with syn3 development...which in this case would be either the Conti or all new Navi....

2. .....or does Ford launch it first with their volume cash cow brand which will obviously generate far more benefit to the entire corporation?

 

It seems the almighty $$$ won on this one.  Holding off until Lincoln could launch what is essentially a co-developed upgrade, seems to have had not enough weighted advantage overall.

 

I guess I agree then.  The masses win.

 

 

This is a habit that Ford (and others) need to get out of.  There is no need to wait for the next total refresh to launch an infotainment product any longer.  Cadillac has started doing Tesla style rolling upgrades to their products... when the base component has been upgraded, all of the relevant vehicles get that upgrade.  For example, the 3.6 V6 and 8-Speed auto that Cadillac just released in conjunction with the CT6;  both the ATS and CTS are getting that upgrade for 2016 as well.  The Cadillac Cue system is getting an upgrade and that will go into all of the cars too (with the possible exception of the SRX for now since that is at the very very end of its model run).

 

Simply put, if the new Sync is ready to go, it should be in all 2016 Lincolns. Period.

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Drew's pretty spot on on this thread.

I tested an escape recently. Can't believe I hadnt. It's pretty good. Now I do say an MKc is missing a nice interior.like the mks it still has cheap ford plastic and bits. But using the escape as basis for an MKc here is alright. Crossover buyers don't need alpha platforms. Lincoln needs to upgrade the interior and justify its price more. But sales don't lie. Where are the new Cadillac crossovers ??????

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Drew's pretty spot on on this thread.

I tested an escape recently. Can't believe I hadnt. It's pretty good. Now I do say an MKc is missing a nice interior.like the mks it still has cheap ford plastic and bits. But using the escape as basis for an MKc here is alright. Crossover buyers don't need alpha platforms. Lincoln needs to upgrade the interior and justify its price more. But sales don't lie. Where are the new Cadillac crossovers ??????

 

The MKC has the nice interior... you just need to pay more to get the higher trims.  I just think Lincoln is asking too much money for the lower trims.

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So your beef with the infotainment is the same as mine with the suspension tuning: Ford Motor Company is a Ford-centric organization. And if you want to go down that path then there will be consequences. In this case it's seeing all your other brands fall by the wayside over the years, including your luxury one, because you cannot/do not do right by their brand mission.

 

Similar, but not the same.  I have no problem with Lincoln borrowing from an excellent (probably class leading in this particular attribute) Ford product.   I'd have no problem with Lincoln taking the Mustang architecture and stretching it into a Mark IX coupe as long as it got it's own look, because as a chassis, the Mustang is a great product. 

 

The current Sync system is terribly out of date compared with other systems. Sync is a negative attribute instead of a positive one like the Escape suspension tuning.  As such, it should either be a simultaneous, corporate-wide rollout of the new version, or it should go to Lincoln first and then filter to the rest. 

 

This is an interesting dilemma.

 

1. Should Ford hold off roll out of sync3, which appears to have been worked on exclusively of any specific vehicle launches, to instead wait for any new Lincoln launch that aligns with syn3 development...which in this case would be either the Conti or all new Navi....

2. .....or does Ford launch it first with their volume cash cow brand which will obviously generate far more benefit to the entire corporation?

 

It seems the almighty $$$ won on this one.  Holding off until Lincoln could launch what is essentially a co-developed upgrade, seems to have had not enough weighted advantage overall.

 

I guess I agree then.  The masses win.

 

 

This is a habit that Ford (and others) need to get out of.  There is no need to wait for the next total refresh to launch an infotainment product any longer.  Cadillac has started doing Tesla style rolling upgrades to their products... when the base component has been upgraded, all of the relevant vehicles get that upgrade.  For example, the 3.6 V6 and 8-Speed auto that Cadillac just released in conjunction with the CT6;  both the ATS and CTS are getting that upgrade for 2016 as well.  The Cadillac Cue system is getting an upgrade and that will go into all of the cars too (with the possible exception of the SRX for now since that is at the very very end of its model run).

 

Simply put, if the new Sync is ready to go, it should be in all 2016 Lincolns. Period.

 

I am a powertrain guy, completely isolated from the infotainment field, but I would guess that Sync3 involves far more than just a firmware or software update.  In the past, any software upgrades were rolled out simultaneously.  So IOW, there must be a reason to their madness.

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      The past few years have seen Mazda designing some distinctive looking vehicles and the redesigned CX-5 is no exception. The overall shape is an evolution of the first-generation model with smoother lines and more curves. The small details such as the wider front grille, slim LED headlights, 19-inch aluminum wheels, and a rear tailgate design similar to the Mazda3 really set the CX-5 apart from the competition. The only item that slightly ruins the design is the oversized Mazda emblem on the front grille. This is due to the emblem holding the hardware for various active safety equipment such as the radar cruise control.
      Moving inside, it is clear Mazda has put a lot of effort in making the CX-5 a cut above the rest. The modern design and appointments such as the stitching on the dash and bright trim around the vents make for a very classy cabin. Most materials are soft-touch which add another level of the premium-ness Mazda is pushing. Controls fall readily to hand for both driver and front-seat passenger. 
      The front seats in the Grand Touring come wrapped in leather upholstery and feature power adjustments and heat. It would be nice if Mazda had the option of ventilation to prop up their premium image, but we’re nitpicking here. The seats offer excellent support over long trips and plenty of head and legroom. Back seat passengers will have no complaints as head and legroom are very competitive with other models, and there is the option of heated seats. Cargo space is where the CX-5 falters. Open the tailgate to be greeted with 30.9 cubic feet behind the rear seats. Fold the seats to expand space to 59.6 cubic feet. It pales in comparison to the likes of the Honda CR-V (39.2 and 75.8 cubic feet) and Volkswagen’s redesigned Tiguan (37.6 and 73.5 cubic feet).
      The Grand Touring comes with a 7-inch touchscreen with the Mazda Connect infotainment system and a control knob. It does take some time to learn the various idiosyncrasies such as the touchscreen functions being locked out when the vehicle is on the move and having to jump through various menus to switch between various audio sources. Once you get the hang of the system, it becomes easy to use. Mazda Connect is beginning to show its age with the dark color palate, somewhat dated navigation interface, and the lack of Apple CarPlay and Android Auto integration. 
      Mazda only offers the 2.5L Skyactiv-G four-cylinder engine with 187 horsepower and 185 pound-feet of torque. This is paired with a six-speed automatic and the choice of either front-wheel or Mazda’s i-Active all-wheel drive. The engine is where Mazda’s premium image takes a serious hit. Around town, the engine is very peppy and is willing to get speed quickly. But the powertrain feels somewhat winded when power was needed to make a pass or merge on an expressway. Mazda has been working on a diesel engine option that was expected to arrive in the second half of last year, but hasn’t come out at the time of this writing. A fix that I’m willing to propose is to offer the turbocharged 2.5L four from the CX-9. The six-speed automatic goes about its business with crisp and smooth shifts.
      Fuel economy for the CX-5 AWD is rated by the EPA at 23 City/29 Highway/26 Combined. My average for the week landed around 25.7 mpg.
      We have praised the previous-generation Mazda CX-5 as being one best driving crossovers. The new one continues that with agile handling and excellent body control. The steering provides excellent feedback and weight when driving down a winding road. Mazda has fitted their G-Vectoring Control that monitors steering and throttle input, and will reduce engine power to improve overall handling. But as I noted in my Mazda6 quick drive last year, I couldn’t tell if the system made a difference or not. The same is true when it comes to the CX-5. This sporting edge does mean the ride quality is slightly rough with a fair number of road imperfections being transmitted inside. The 19-inch wheels don’t help with this and it might be worth considering dropping down to the Touring for the smaller 17-inch wheels. At least Mazda is continuing to improve road and wind noise isolation. Compared to the last CX-5 I drove, there is a reduction in road and wind noise inside. It is almost as quiet as what you might find in a luxury model.
      If I was to recommend a CX-5 for most buyers in 2017, that would be the Grand Touring. While I find the price to be slightly high and the 19-inch wheels make the ride uncomfortable, it was the only way to get a number of active safety features such as radar cruise control and the smart city brake support. Thankfully for 2018, Mazda has migrated a number of those features down to the Touring and Sport trims. If you’re considering a 2018 CX-5, the Touring is your best bet as you’ll get most everything on the Grand Touring at a price that won’t break the bank.
      Has Mazda accomplished their hopes of becoming more premium? The answer is a bit mixed. For the positives, Mazda has been making great strides in improving the noise isolation in their vehicles and the new CX-5 is no exception. There is also the distinctive exterior shape, noticeable improvement in material quality, and the sharp driving dynamics that have made the CX-5 a darling of the automotive press. The negatives on the CX-5 include a slightly stiff ride, smallish cargo area, and certain missing features that would really help with the premium image Mazda is trying to project. But the biggest issue has to be the engine. While 2.5 Skyactiv-G is perfectly adequate around town, it really struggles when more speed is called for. Dropping either the long-delayed diesel or the CX-9’s turbo-four would really do wonders and help foster the premium image.
      The 2017 Mazda CX-5 is so close to the premium edge. It just needs a few more tweaks to reach it.
      Disclaimer: Mazda Provided the CX-5, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2017
      Make: Mazda
      Model: CX-5
      Trim: Grand Touring AWD
      Engine: 2.5L Skyactiv-G Four-Cylinder
      Driveline: Six-Speed Automatic
      Horsepower @ RPM: 187 @ 6,000
      Torque @ RPM: 186 @ 4,000 
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 23/29/26
      Curb Weight: 3,693 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Hiroshima, Japan
      Base Price: $30,695
      As Tested Price: $34,380 (Includes $940.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Premium Package - $1,830.00
      Soul Red - $595.00
      Retractable Cargo Cover $250.00
      Cargo Mat - $70.00

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      Mazda has a big dream for itself. It is trying to stand out from the competition by becoming more premium. The first steps of this process took place last year with a refreshed Mazda6 sedan. As we noted in our review at the time, the 6 made great strides in improving noise isolation and material quality. Now, the premium dream is coming more into focus with the redesigned CX-5. Mazda is making some big promises with claims of improved refinement and an upscale look and feel for the interior. We spent a week in a 2017 CX-5 Grand Touring to see if those promises are met.
      The past few years have seen Mazda designing some distinctive looking vehicles and the redesigned CX-5 is no exception. The overall shape is an evolution of the first-generation model with smoother lines and more curves. The small details such as the wider front grille, slim LED headlights, 19-inch aluminum wheels, and a rear tailgate design similar to the Mazda3 really set the CX-5 apart from the competition. The only item that slightly ruins the design is the oversized Mazda emblem on the front grille. This is due to the emblem holding the hardware for various active safety equipment such as the radar cruise control.
      Moving inside, it is clear Mazda has put a lot of effort in making the CX-5 a cut above the rest. The modern design and appointments such as the stitching on the dash and bright trim around the vents make for a very classy cabin. Most materials are soft-touch which add another level of the premium-ness Mazda is pushing. Controls fall readily to hand for both driver and front-seat passenger. 
      The front seats in the Grand Touring come wrapped in leather upholstery and feature power adjustments and heat. It would be nice if Mazda had the option of ventilation to prop up their premium image, but we’re nitpicking here. The seats offer excellent support over long trips and plenty of head and legroom. Back seat passengers will have no complaints as head and legroom are very competitive with other models, and there is the option of heated seats. Cargo space is where the CX-5 falters. Open the tailgate to be greeted with 30.9 cubic feet behind the rear seats. Fold the seats to expand space to 59.6 cubic feet. It pales in comparison to the likes of the Honda CR-V (39.2 and 75.8 cubic feet) and Volkswagen’s redesigned Tiguan (37.6 and 73.5 cubic feet).
      The Grand Touring comes with a 7-inch touchscreen with the Mazda Connect infotainment system and a control knob. It does take some time to learn the various idiosyncrasies such as the touchscreen functions being locked out when the vehicle is on the move and having to jump through various menus to switch between various audio sources. Once you get the hang of the system, it becomes easy to use. Mazda Connect is beginning to show its age with the dark color palate, somewhat dated navigation interface, and the lack of Apple CarPlay and Android Auto integration. 
      Mazda only offers the 2.5L Skyactiv-G four-cylinder engine with 187 horsepower and 185 pound-feet of torque. This is paired with a six-speed automatic and the choice of either front-wheel or Mazda’s i-Active all-wheel drive. The engine is where Mazda’s premium image takes a serious hit. Around town, the engine is very peppy and is willing to get speed quickly. But the powertrain feels somewhat winded when power was needed to make a pass or merge on an expressway. Mazda has been working on a diesel engine option that was expected to arrive in the second half of last year, but hasn’t come out at the time of this writing. A fix that I’m willing to propose is to offer the turbocharged 2.5L four from the CX-9. The six-speed automatic goes about its business with crisp and smooth shifts.
      Fuel economy for the CX-5 AWD is rated by the EPA at 23 City/29 Highway/26 Combined. My average for the week landed around 25.7 mpg.
      We have praised the previous-generation Mazda CX-5 as being one best driving crossovers. The new one continues that with agile handling and excellent body control. The steering provides excellent feedback and weight when driving down a winding road. Mazda has fitted their G-Vectoring Control that monitors steering and throttle input, and will reduce engine power to improve overall handling. But as I noted in my Mazda6 quick drive last year, I couldn’t tell if the system made a difference or not. The same is true when it comes to the CX-5. This sporting edge does mean the ride quality is slightly rough with a fair number of road imperfections being transmitted inside. The 19-inch wheels don’t help with this and it might be worth considering dropping down to the Touring for the smaller 17-inch wheels. At least Mazda is continuing to improve road and wind noise isolation. Compared to the last CX-5 I drove, there is a reduction in road and wind noise inside. It is almost as quiet as what you might find in a luxury model.
      If I was to recommend a CX-5 for most buyers in 2017, that would be the Grand Touring. While I find the price to be slightly high and the 19-inch wheels make the ride uncomfortable, it was the only way to get a number of active safety features such as radar cruise control and the smart city brake support. Thankfully for 2018, Mazda has migrated a number of those features down to the Touring and Sport trims. If you’re considering a 2018 CX-5, the Touring is your best bet as you’ll get most everything on the Grand Touring at a price that won’t break the bank.
      Has Mazda accomplished their hopes of becoming more premium? The answer is a bit mixed. For the positives, Mazda has been making great strides in improving the noise isolation in their vehicles and the new CX-5 is no exception. There is also the distinctive exterior shape, noticeable improvement in material quality, and the sharp driving dynamics that have made the CX-5 a darling of the automotive press. The negatives on the CX-5 include a slightly stiff ride, smallish cargo area, and certain missing features that would really help with the premium image Mazda is trying to project. But the biggest issue has to be the engine. While 2.5 Skyactiv-G is perfectly adequate around town, it really struggles when more speed is called for. Dropping either the long-delayed diesel or the CX-9’s turbo-four would really do wonders and help foster the premium image.
      The 2017 Mazda CX-5 is so close to the premium edge. It just needs a few more tweaks to reach it.
      Disclaimer: Mazda Provided the CX-5, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2017
      Make: Mazda
      Model: CX-5
      Trim: Grand Touring AWD
      Engine: 2.5L Skyactiv-G Four-Cylinder
      Driveline: Six-Speed Automatic
      Horsepower @ RPM: 187 @ 6,000
      Torque @ RPM: 186 @ 4,000 
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 23/29/26
      Curb Weight: 3,693 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Hiroshima, Japan
      Base Price: $30,695
      As Tested Price: $34,380 (Includes $940.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Premium Package - $1,830.00
      Soul Red - $595.00
      Retractable Cargo Cover $250.00
      Cargo Mat - $70.00
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