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Audi News: 2017 Audi A5/S5 Sportback Is A Mashup of Coupe/Hatchback/Sedan

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Only a couple months after Audi introduced the redesigned A5 and S5 coupes, the German automaker has revealed the updated Sportback model.

Think of the A5/S5 Sportback as an A7 that has been hit with a shrink ray. Various design details such as a new grille, reshaped headlights, and redesigned bumper that premiered on the coupe are here on the Sportback. The interior follows the same design as the new A4 and A5. That means an 8.3-inch screen with Audi's MMI infotainment system and the option of Audi Virtual Cockpit that swaps the standard instrument cluster for a 12.3-inch screen. 

For the European market, the A5 will be available with two TFSI gas engines, three TDI engines, and Audi's g-tron powertrain - able to run on gas, natural gas, or Audi's e-gas (synthetic type of gasoline). Front-wheel drive comes standard, while quattro all-wheel drive is an option. The S5 will feature a turbocharged 3.0L V6 354 horsepower and 368 pound-feet of torque. quattro all-wheel drive will come standard.

Audi will be showing the 2017 A5 and S5 Sportback at the Paris Motor Show. Sales will begin in January for Europe. As for the U.S., Audi is currently deciding whether or not the Sportback comes. 

Source: Audi

Press Release is on Page 2


The new Audi A5 and S5 Sportback - design meets functionality

  • New look, greater efficiency and lots of space in the interior
  • Alternative drive: Audi A5 g-tron runs on e-gas, natural gas or gasoline
  • Power pack: Audi S5 with 354 hp and 500 Nm (368.8 lb-ft) of torque 

Seven years after the birth of the A5 Sportback*, the new version now makes its appearance. The five-door coupé blends elegant, emotional design with high functionality and abundant interior comfort. The family-friendly car is perfectly connected and offers the latest infotainment features. Plus, the second generation comes with a completely reengineered suspension, high-performance drives and innovative driver assistance systems. The S5* takes to the road with a new six-cylinder turbo engine developing a mighty 354 hp and 500 Nm (368.8 lb-ft). In a new departure, the A5 Sportback is also available as a bivalent g-tron*, which customers can run on either Audi e-gas, natural gas or gasoline.

Exterior design
The Audi designers have brought together dramatic shapes and athletically taut surfaces in the design of the new A5 Sportback. The stretched wheelbase, the short overhangs and the long, wraparound front lid with power dome emphasize the dynamism of the five-door coupé. The three-dimensionally modeled Singleframe grille is significantly flatter and wider than on the previous model.

The wave-pattern shoulder line imparts the A5 Sportback with emotional elegance. It is even more strongly accentuated than on the previous model and traces all three dimensions. This creates an interplay of light and shadow. The pronounced bulges over the wheel arches underscore the quattro DNA. The rear end exhibits horizontal, equally highly precise styling. 
The stretched luggage compartment lid terminates with a characteristic spoiler edge.

Interior
The new Audi S5 Sportback has grown significantly inside. Its interior length has gained 17 millimeters (0.7 in), the shoulder room for driver and front passenger up to 11 millimeters (0.4 in) and the rear knee room 24 millimeters (0.9 in). The sophisticated materials, precision of fit and color harmonies in the interior are typical of Audi. The horizontal architecture of the instrument panel creates a sense of spaciousness. The optional ambient lighting with 30 colors to choose from always evokes a fitting interior mood.

With 480 liters (17.0 cu ft) of luggage capacity, the A5 Sportback rates among the best in its class. Audi also offers the option of sensor control for opening and closing the standard-fit electric luggage compartment lid.

Display and controls
Thanks to the all-new operating and display concept, including free-text search, the driver can control all functions effortlessly and intuitively. As an alternative to the standard-fit analog instrument dials, there is the Audi virtual cockpit. The various display options bring the driver added convenience. The large, high-resolution TFT monitor (12.3 inches) presents richly detailed graphics. The optional head-up display projects all relevant information onto the windscreen as easily comprehensible symbols and digits, thus enabling the driver to keep their eyes on the road.

Infotainment and Audi connect
Audi’s top version is MMI navigation plus with MMI touch. It includes such features as 10 GB of flash storage, a DVD drive, Audi connect services free of charge for three years, up to five free navigation updates and an 8.3-inch monitor with a resolution of 1,024 x 480 pixels. Audi MMI navigation plus works in close cooperation with many of the assistance and safety systems.

The Audi smartphone interface integrates iOS and Android cellphones in an environment specially developed for them in the MMI. The Audi phone box connects smartphones to the on-board antenna to provide superior reception quality. It also charges the smartphone inductively, without any wires, using the Qi standard. The Bang & Olufsen Sound System with innovative 3D sound opens up the spatial dimension of height and gives the driver the sense of sitting in a concert hall. Its amplifier supplies 755 watts of power to 19 loudspeakers. The Audi tablet serves as a flexible Rear Seat Entertainment device, both inside and outside the car.

Driver assistance systems
The driver assistance systems cover a wide range of functions in the new Audi A5 Sportback. An intelligent combination of different technologies enhances safety, comfort and efficiency. Meanwhile Audi is also taking the next step toward piloted driving.

Playing a central role here is the adaptive cruise control (ACC) Stop&Go system including traffic jam assist. It relieves drivers in slow-moving traffic up to a driving speed of 65 km/h (40.4 mph) by assuming the tasks of braking and accelerating the car, and it also temporarily takes charge of steering it on better roads. The predictive efficiency assistant, which evaluates GPS information from the car’s immediate surroundings, helps to save fuel by giving specific driving advice – a unique feature in this segment.

Collision avoidance assist intervenes if the car needs to drive around an obstacle to avoid an accident. Based on data from the front camera, ACC and radar sensors, it computes a recommended driving line within a fraction of a second. The lineup is rounded out by other assistance systems such as turn assist, park assist, cross traffic assist rear, exit warning, camera-based traffic sign recognition, Audi active lane assist and Audi side assist.

Suspension
The wide track and comparatively long wheelbase are key features of the balanced, sporty suspension tuning. The track width is 1,587 millimeters (62.5 in) at the front and 1,568 millimeters (61.7 in) at the rear. The wheelbase measures 2,824 millimeters (111.2 in).

The front axle features redesigned five-link suspension, while a five-link construction replaces the trapezoidal-link rear suspension used previously. The adaptive dampers available optionally are integrated into the standard Audi drive select dynamic handling system. They make for a driving experience that is both dynamic and comfortable. The new electromechanical power steering provides better road feedback and steering precision. Optionally available is dynamic steering, which varies its gear ratio depending on the speed and steering angle.

Engines and drivetrain
Customers can choose between two TFSI and three TDI engine versions for the new Audi A5 Sportback. They produce between 140 kW (190 hp) and 210 kW (286 hp) of power. Compared with the previous model, Audi has reduced their fuel consumption by as much as 22 percent while increasing power output by up to 17 percent.

Six-speed manual transmission, seven-speed S tronic dual-clutch transmission or eight-speed tiptronic – there is tailor-made drivetrain technology available for every engine version. Front-wheel drive is standard, with quattro all-wheel drive available as an option in two versions. It is standard for the 3.0 TDI with 210 kW (286 hp).

The V6 turbo engine accelerates the equally new Audi S5 Sportback from 0 to 100 km/h (62.1 mph) in 4.7 seconds, and on up to an electronically governed top speed of 250 km/h (155.3 mph). It features quattro and the eight-speed tiptronic as standard. In a new departure, the Ingolstadt carmaker now also includes a bivalent A5 Sportback g-tron in its range. Its 
2.0 TFSI engine develops 125 kW (170 hp) and can run on Audi e-gas or natural gas, but also on gasoline.

Body and equipment
The body of the new Audi A5 Sportback is the lightest in the segment. An intelligent mix of materials makes it 15 kilograms (33.1 lb) lighter than that of the predecessor. The overall weight of the new generation has fallen by as much as 85 kilograms (187.4 lb) to just 1,470 kilograms (3,240.8 lb), excluding the driver.

Audi offers the model with an upgraded list of standard equipment that includes a wide range of extra functions. The new lines concept with various equipment packages enhances the scope for individual design expression.

The new Audi A5 and S5 Sportback will roll into showrooms in Germany and other European countries at the start of 2017. The A5 Sportback starts from EUR 37,800. The price for the S5 is EUR 62,500.


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Audi build nice auto's but after looking through these pictures, I have to say WOW, Can we talk Retro to the 80's.

I know the Coupe look for 4 door sedans is big, but it just blends in to the point of Blah with all the other 4 door coupe style sedans.

Interior is the 80's nightmare, that dash is so dated, why the hell would you want something that ugly, terrible, just pathetic.

Total FAIL from the Moment someone approved that bad design. GM maximized this dash style in an overkill of badge engineering and the public killed them for it, why would anyone want to buy this from a german auto maker.

:facepalm:

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I have yet to look at an Audi outside of the R8 and come away even considering a purchase. The vehicles simply look to jellybean to get excited about. I would buy a BMW before any of them.. and Cadillac or Corvette before all. Obviously. 

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On 9/7/2016 at 5:48 PM, ccap41 said:

A28B9757-5411-4BA1-B55C-44A4D9FAE895_zps

holy crap.  beat me to it.  There's some Nissan Altima in that thing too.  The Audi is more cab rearward though.

Audi's been rehashing shit over and over for a long time now yet the Audiphiles think its all cutting edge stuff.

I will say this.  Even though this is blandmobile, it does sort of blur the distinction from sedans and liftbacks even more to the point where its tough to discern.  If this sort of thing tests the waters with more liftbacks that could make it to the US i think this middle ground might become something that may bring in some folks that like sedans but are being lured by the crossover utlity thing.

On 9/8/2016 at 8:18 AM, Cmicasa the Great said:

I have yet to look at an Audi outside of the R8 and come away even considering a purchase. The vehicles simply look to jellybean to get excited about. I would buy a BMW before any of them.. and Cadillac or Corvette before all. Obviously. 

we may hit a cycle soon where we go back to blockier shapes and sharper lines.  Just as Cadillac puts out an ovoid concept car without blades and creases.

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I think the entire previous gen A5/S5 lineup looked better in and out.  Here is the Sportback we never got

 

audi-a5-sportback-2014-i16.jpg

 

A5-Sportback-w.jpg

2014_Audi_A5_Sportback_Interior.jpg

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    • By William Maley
      I have been on record of not liking the 2.0L turbo-four Lexus uses in a number of their vehicles. Previous reviews have highlighted the horrendous turbo lag and power falling off a cliff after a certain point on the rpm band. But after spending a week with the 2017 Lexus GS 200t, I found that Lexus may have fixed one of the big issues with this engine.
      A quick refresher on the turbo 2.0L. The engine has ratings of 241 horsepower and 258 pound-feet of torque. An eight-speed automatic is the only transmission on offer. The engine feels quite punchy when the boost kicks in as it moves the 3,805 pound sedan without breaking a sweat. Another positive is how quiet and refined the engine is during acceleration and at cruise. There are a couple of downsides. As I mentioned in the RC 200t review, the engine does run out of steam at higher rpms which makes merging onto a freeway slightly tricky. The transmission programming in the ‘Normal’ drive mode leans heavily towards boosting fuel economy with rapid upshifts and slow downshifts. This was easily remedied by putting the GS into the ‘Sport’ drive mode. EPA fuel economy figures for the GS 200t at 22 City/32 Highway/26 Combined. I only averaged a very disappointing 19.2 mpg for the week. A lot of this can be attributed to the cold snap where the high temperature at the times was around 10 to 15 degrees. This meant I was running the vehicle at idle for a fair amount of time to warm it up. The GS 200t’s suspension provides a mostly smooth ride with only a couple of bumps making their way inside. Road and wind noise are almost nonexistent. I cannot really comment on the GS 200t’s handling as most of the roads were snow-covered during the week and the Michelin GreenX tires were more keen on spinning in the snow than actually getting the car moving. A set of all-seasons or snow tires would have done wonders for it. Reading through some other reviews, the consensus seems to be the GS shows little body roll and has decent steering weight. Lexus updated the GS’ styling back in 2016 with a revised front end, complete with a spindle grille and upside-down eyelash LED lighting. I’m usually not a fan of the standard insert for the spindle grille - like the mesh insert on the F-Sport. But I will admit the slat grille on this particular model works quite well. Other changes include new wheels (18-inches on our tester) and taillights. The interior hasn’t really changed since I last drove the GS back in 2013. In certain respects, this is ok. The design still holds up with the brushed-metal accents and textured black trim. Material quality is top notch as well with many surfaces being covered in soft-touch plastics and leather. Seating offers the right amount of support and comfort needed for long trips. The only downside is the large transmission tunnel that eats into rear legroom. The GS still uses the first-generation Lexus Enform infotainment system, complete with the joystick controller. The controller is a pain to use with an inconsistent feeling when using it to move around the system. At times, you’ll find yourself either overshooting or not selecting the function because of the vague feeling provided by the controller. This hurts an otherwise pretty good system with a modern design and large 12.3-inch screen with the ability of split-screen viewing. The base price of the 2017 GS 200t is $46,310. Our test vehicle came equipped with a few options such as navigation, 17-speaker Mark Levinson audio system, heated and ventilated front seats, power trunk, and 18-inch wheels that raised the price to a very reasonable $52,295. Disclaimer: Lexus Provided the GS 200t, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2017
      Make: Lexus
      Model: GS
      Trim: 200t
      Engine: Turbocharged 2.0L DOHC 16-Valve with Dual VVT-iW
      Driveline: Eight-Speed Automatic, Rear-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 241 @ 5,800
      Torque @ RPM: 258 @ 1,650-4,400
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 22/32/26
      Curb Weight: 3,805 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Aichi, Japan
      Base Price: $46,310
      As Tested Price: $52,295 (Includes $975.00 Destination Charge and $1,730 Navigation Package Credit)
      Options:
      Navigation w/12.3-inch screen with Lexus Enform - $1,730.00
      Premium Package - $1,400.00
      Mark Levinson Premium Surround Sound Audio System - $1,380.00
      18" All Season Tires - $905.00
      Intuitive Park Assist - $500.00
      Illuminated Door Sills - $425.00
      One-Touch Power Trunk - $400.00
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