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William Maley

Volvo News: The Best-Selling Vehicle In Sweden Isn't A Volvo

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For more than half of a century, the best-selling vehicle in Sweden wore a Volvo badge. But in 2016, this changed as the best selling model wasn't a Volvo.

 

BBC News reports that the Volkswagen Golf was the best-selling model in Sweden in 2016. According to data from the country's carmakers' association, the Golf made up 5.9 percent of new car sales in 2016. The Volvo V70, S90, and V90 made up 5.7 percent. It should be noted Volvo as a brand is still the top seller in Sweden with 21.5 percent of total vehicle sales (about 1 in 5 vehicles). Volkswagen only makes up 15.7 percent of total sales.

This isn't the first time that Volkswagen has knocked Volvo off the best-selling model perch. Back in 1962, the Volkswagen Beetle was the best-selling model in Sweden.

Source: BBC News


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Interesting, wonder if chinese ownership had anything to do with this?

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4 hours ago, dfelt said:

Interesting, wonder if chinese ownership had anything to do with this?

 

Maybe, or it they could be waiting for new products coming....

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On 1/3/2017 at 9:36 PM, dfelt said:

Interesting, wonder if chinese ownership had anything to do with this?

Nope as the BBC story says,

"Despite Volvo's car business now being owned by a Chinese firm, Zhejiang Geely Holding Group, it is still viewed as an iconic Swedish brand.


And it still sells the most cars in Sweden, with more than one in five cars (21.5%) on the country's roads, compared with Volkswagen's 15.7%."

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