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William Maley

Volvo News: New Trademarks Hint At EVs from Volvo

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Volvo has been busy filing trademark applications in Europe. Swedespeed reports that Volvo has applications filed for P5, P6, P8, P9, and P10 with European Union Intellectual Property Office. The applications say the names would be used for “vehicles and conveyances; Electric vehicles.” This leads Sweedspeed to speculate the names could be used on Volvo's current models to designate an electric version - S90 P6 for example.

Last year, Volvo CEO Håkan Samuelsson said they plan on launching their first electric vehicle by 2019.

Meanwhile, in the U.S., Volvo has filled out trademark applications V20 and V30. There isn't much information with these applications, saying they could be used on motor vehicles or other items such as steering wheels. Swedespeed thinks these names could be for small vehicles.

Source: Swedespeed


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P ??????? Why a P, that makes no sense to me. How does that say EV or Hybrid?

Someone want to help me out here as to what I am missing?

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Well people will certainly feel like peeing on them.  They won't sell, that much is certain.

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Maybe 'P' for power and the number denotes battery kilowatt hours? So:

P6 = 60 kWh, p10 = 100 kWh...

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29 minutes ago, FAPTurbo said:

Maybe 'P' for power and the number denotes battery kilowatt hours? So:

P6 = 60 kWh, p10 = 100 kWh...

I like your Thinking Peach Butt! :P

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Why would they do 50 to 100, with increments of 10 kWH?

 

I think it might be P for plug with the number being more actually about the kind of comparable gas engine to look at... So P6 would be like a equivalent of the T6 already available..., but really, who gives a hell? Why do electric vehicles need, at times.... dumb names that always have to signify "oh look here I am electric, my electrons will teleport you faster than your engines could ever chug lung cancer juice."

 

So T8 v. P8.....I think battery capacity might increase but not increments of 10....that sounds arbritary, too many variants and wasteful. Unless you cannot get a P5 through 7 on the S90. Only P8 and up, being even higher than the T8...

 

 

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8 hours ago, Suaviloquent said:

Why would they do 50 to 100, with increments of 10 kWH?

I think it might be P for plug with the number being more actually about the kind of comparable gas engine to look at... So P6 would be like a equivalent of the T6 already available..., but really, who gives a hell? Why do electric vehicles need, at times.... dumb names that always have to signify "oh look here I am electric, my electrons will teleport you faster than your engines could ever chug lung cancer juice."

So T8 v. P8.....I think battery capacity might increase but not increments of 10....that sounds arbritary, too many variants and wasteful. Unless you cannot get a P5 through 7 on the S90. Only P8 and up, being even higher than the T8...

If you think of what Tesla offers which is in increments of 10, I can totally see it being the battery size.

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