Jump to content
  • Welcome Guest!

    Founded in 2001, CheersandGears.com is one of the oldest continuously running automotive enthusiast communities on the net. 

    Sign up is free and easy, come join the fun!

William Maley

Industry News: Dealers Want President Trump To Ease Fuel Economy Standards

Recommended Posts

Since President Donald Trump was elected, automakers have been pushing for him to relax the stricter fuel economy and emission regulations coming into effect by 2025. Now there is another group calling for this.

At the National Automobile Dealers Association (NADA) annual conference, dealers voiced support for the new president ease the upcoming regulations. 

"You inflate the price of the vehicle and a car that was maybe within reach of being affordable now may not be," said NADA's new chairman, Mark Scarpelli to Reuters.

Scarpelli argues that the tech needed to improve fuel economy adds $1,500 to $3,000 to the price of a vehicle. He also says that a "different phase-in period" for the regulations would be welcomed.

The big argument dealers are using is the regulations would cause automakers to build vehicles that buyers aren't interested in.

"They've got to make regulation more in line with consumer demand so (the automakers) can build what people want and not what the government’s telling them they have to build," said Pete DeLongchamps, vice president of Group 1 Automotive Inc.

Source: Reuters


View full article

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think they will get a break from the 2025 standard but the companies are not going to go back to building more V8 models etc. They need to meet the needs globally and California. I expect them just needed a break from the crazy standard we have hanging out there that just can not be met with present technology that anyone would be willing to pay for in large numbers. 

The EV needs to continue to improve to fill the gap on the Cafe. As of now it is still too expensive and limited in areas that the average buyer is willing to accept. 

Once a EV is to the point people do not have to change their routine or lifestyle then it is ready for prime time. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A delay to 2030 could help them.  By then I'd imagine electric will be in a lot of powertrains, whether full EV or plug in hybrid of some sort.  I see no reason to lower the CAFE number, but perhaps give them another 5 years to get there, and get cost down to where the market will buy these hybrids.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
52 minutes ago, smk4565 said:

A delay to 2030 could help them.  By then I'd imagine electric will be in a lot of powertrains, whether full EV or plug in hybrid of some sort.  I see no reason to lower the CAFE number, but perhaps give them another 5 years to get there, and get cost down to where the market will buy these hybrids.

I agree push it to 2030 and let them continue to drive the EV.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, I wouldn't back off the 54 mpg CAFE number though and I'd make crossovers the same as cars.  People buy RAV4 as a replacement for a Camry, they should be treated the same with CAFE.  Something like a Transit or F150 I can see under a truck standard.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would freeze emissions standards and drop fuel mileage requirements entirely.  Let people decide what to drive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

regardless of whether engines are small and tiny or turbo or have ten speeds, the vehicle weight means as much to FE.  And we've done all we can for awhile in weight savings and tiny turbos.  I'd rather see some tax incentives to push more volt type vehicles in addition to leveling out the FE and emissions standards for awhile.  Maybe give some tax credits for continued FE improvements rather than mandates.

 

a 4000 pound sedan with a 7.5 second 0-60 in 2000 vs. 2016 probably ends up with the same real world FE anyways.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, ocnblu said:

I would freeze emissions standards and drop fuel mileage requirements entirely.  Let people decide what to drive.

I almost agree with this.....but we have quite far already-might be time to slow it down for a while.

There will still be improvements, but let's let the tech out there become a bit more common- and she how well it holds up long term.

 

I see plenty of turbo'd cars out there....but the engines require a bit more care than a regular one. I've seen quite a few abused Cruzes already, for example.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some of the people will demand fuel economy, some will demand power.  Everyone is different.  Everyone should have what they want.  Better for business.  Better for the U.S. economy as a whole.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Automakers are building for a global market. While we can pause the CAFE here companies will still have to continue to improve it. 

They need to just slow the time line down and make it fit the global plan more so we can help these automakers not have to make special cars for some countries. This is all they are asking for with the US movement. 

Really if you take Germany. USA and Japan and get them all to agree it will fix about 90% of the problems. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do not forget that some large markets like India and China have such bad pollution problems that EV will be the future, Hybrids a stepping stone and auto makers will have to build as Hyperv6 states for the global market and not just the tiny US market anymore.

Days of the US dictates the market are over.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

Guest
You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




  • Today's Birthdays

    1. dans30thta
      dans30thta
      Age: 49
  • Similar Content

    • By William Maley
      When Ford announced the new 3.0L Power Stroke V6 diesel for the 2018 F-150, the company said the engine should return 30 mpg on the highway. Today, the official EPA numbers for the Power Stroke V6 have come out and it will return 22 City/30 Highway/25 Combined. But there is a catch to this. As The Car Connection notes, this is for the two-wheel drive variant. The four-wheel drive variant is more thirsty with EPA figures of 20/25/22.
      Still, the 3.0L Power Stoke V6 beats the 3.0L EcoDiesel found in the current Ram 1500 - 20/27/23 for 2WD and 19/27/22 for 4WD.
      “Even a few years ago, customers wouldn’t have imagined an EPA-estimated rating of 30 mpg highway would be possible in a full-size pickup, but our team of crazy-smart engineers rose to the challenge,” said Hau Thai-Tang, Ford executive vice president, product development and purchasing in a statement.
      Ford says the Power Stroke V6 can tow up to 11,400 pounds and has a max payload of 2,020 pounds for XL and XLT fleet applications (1,940 pounds for retail applications).
      Source: Ford, The Car Connection
      New Ford F-150 Power Stroke Diesel Has Best-In-Class EPA-Estimated 30 MPG Highway Fuel Economy Rating
      Efficient: 2018 F-150 3.0-liter Power Stroke® diesel has a best-in-class EPA-estimated fuel economy rating of 30 mpg highway Powerful: First-ever F-150 Power Stroke diesel engine offers best-in-class 250 diesel horsepower and 440 lb.-ft. of torque Capable: Diesel-equipped F-150 brings best-in-class diesel towing and payload capacity DEARBORN, Mich., April 19, 2018 – The 2018 Ford F-150’s first 3.0-liter Power Stroke® diesel engine officially boasts EPA-estimated ratings of 30 mpg highway, 22 mpg city and 25 mpg combined. These are the highest EPA-estimated ratings available in a full-size pickup truck.
      These benchmark figures are the result of more than a decade of work developing a lightweight high-strength, military-grade, aluminum-alloy body, a 10-speed SelectShift® transmission, and robust engine construction of aluminum and compacted graphite iron to deliver durability, reduced weight and stump-pulling torque.
      “Even a few years ago, customers wouldn’t have imagined an EPA-estimated rating of 30 mpg highway would be possible in a full-size pickup, but our team of crazy-smart engineers rose to the challenge,” said Hau Thai-Tang, Ford executive vice president, product development and purchasing.
      In addition to its leading fuel economy ratings, the all-new F-150 Power Stroke boasts best-in-class* diesel power – 250 horsepower and a stout 440 lb.-ft. of torque – greater torque than a 2019 Ram 1500 Hemi V8. It provides best-in-class diesel towing of 11,400 pounds for pulling boats, horses or RVs. The new engine also provides best-in-class diesel payload – 2,020 pounds for XL and XLT fleet applications, and 1,940 pounds for retail applications – to easily haul equipment, supplies or a slide-in camper.
      F-150 Power Stroke diesel shares its proven commercial-grade technology with F-Series Super Duty’s 6.7-liter Power Stroke – America’s most powerful, capable heavy-duty pickup truck ever.
      The 2018 Ford F-150 with all-new 3.0-liter Power Stroke diesel engine will begin shipping to dealers in May.
      *Class is full-size pickups under 8,500 pounds. GVWR based on Ford segmentation.

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      When Ford announced the new 3.0L Power Stroke V6 diesel for the 2018 F-150, the company said the engine should return 30 mpg on the highway. Today, the official EPA numbers for the Power Stroke V6 have come out and it will return 22 City/30 Highway/25 Combined. But there is a catch to this. As The Car Connection notes, this is for the two-wheel drive variant. The four-wheel drive variant is more thirsty with EPA figures of 20/25/22.
      Still, the 3.0L Power Stoke V6 beats the 3.0L EcoDiesel found in the current Ram 1500 - 20/27/23 for 2WD and 19/27/22 for 4WD.
      “Even a few years ago, customers wouldn’t have imagined an EPA-estimated rating of 30 mpg highway would be possible in a full-size pickup, but our team of crazy-smart engineers rose to the challenge,” said Hau Thai-Tang, Ford executive vice president, product development and purchasing in a statement.
      Ford says the Power Stroke V6 can tow up to 11,400 pounds and has a max payload of 2,020 pounds for XL and XLT fleet applications (1,940 pounds for retail applications).
      Source: Ford, The Car Connection
      New Ford F-150 Power Stroke Diesel Has Best-In-Class EPA-Estimated 30 MPG Highway Fuel Economy Rating
      Efficient: 2018 F-150 3.0-liter Power Stroke® diesel has a best-in-class EPA-estimated fuel economy rating of 30 mpg highway Powerful: First-ever F-150 Power Stroke diesel engine offers best-in-class 250 diesel horsepower and 440 lb.-ft. of torque Capable: Diesel-equipped F-150 brings best-in-class diesel towing and payload capacity DEARBORN, Mich., April 19, 2018 – The 2018 Ford F-150’s first 3.0-liter Power Stroke® diesel engine officially boasts EPA-estimated ratings of 30 mpg highway, 22 mpg city and 25 mpg combined. These are the highest EPA-estimated ratings available in a full-size pickup truck.
      These benchmark figures are the result of more than a decade of work developing a lightweight high-strength, military-grade, aluminum-alloy body, a 10-speed SelectShift® transmission, and robust engine construction of aluminum and compacted graphite iron to deliver durability, reduced weight and stump-pulling torque.
      “Even a few years ago, customers wouldn’t have imagined an EPA-estimated rating of 30 mpg highway would be possible in a full-size pickup, but our team of crazy-smart engineers rose to the challenge,” said Hau Thai-Tang, Ford executive vice president, product development and purchasing.
      In addition to its leading fuel economy ratings, the all-new F-150 Power Stroke boasts best-in-class* diesel power – 250 horsepower and a stout 440 lb.-ft. of torque – greater torque than a 2019 Ram 1500 Hemi V8. It provides best-in-class diesel towing of 11,400 pounds for pulling boats, horses or RVs. The new engine also provides best-in-class diesel payload – 2,020 pounds for XL and XLT fleet applications, and 1,940 pounds for retail applications – to easily haul equipment, supplies or a slide-in camper.
      F-150 Power Stroke diesel shares its proven commercial-grade technology with F-Series Super Duty’s 6.7-liter Power Stroke – America’s most powerful, capable heavy-duty pickup truck ever.
      The 2018 Ford F-150 with all-new 3.0-liter Power Stroke diesel engine will begin shipping to dealers in May.
      *Class is full-size pickups under 8,500 pounds. GVWR based on Ford segmentation.
    • By William Maley
      Earlier this week, the Environmental Protection Agency announced that it would be rolling back the fuel-efficiency regulations that were approved during the Obama administration. The agency also announced possibly revoking California's waiver that allows it to set tougher standards on vehicle emissions. The state vowed to fight this. But a new report from the New York Times says California and officials from the Trump administration are in talks about possibly reaching a deal to avoid a legal fight.
      Speaking to a half-dozen of sources briefed about the talks, the Times reports that the two parties, along with representatives of major automakers, "are searching for a compromise that could save a uniform set of standards for the entire country." 
      One of the proposals on the table is to keep the Obama fuel economy standards, but allow automakers to take advantage of more generous loopholes to meet them. In turn, the Trump administration would honor California's wavier through 2030. There could be other proposals in the cards as the EPA, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, and the White House begin to coordinate their various strategies.
      There are a number of obstacles that could derail the talks. Various automakers "are in different positions” on how to proceed with the talks. According to a source, some are focused on rolling back the standards through 2025, while others want to have the discussion to reach a compromise to avoid having to build vehicles to different standards. The talks themselves seem to be spinning their wheels. Last week, William Wehrum, the EPA's senior clean air adviser met with Mary D. Nichols, chairwoman of the California Air Resources Board. Depending on who you ask, the meeting didn't amount to anything or was considered to be productive.
      Source: New York Times
    • By William Maley
      Earlier this week, the Environmental Protection Agency announced that it would be rolling back the fuel-efficiency regulations that were approved during the Obama administration. The agency also announced possibly revoking California's waiver that allows it to set tougher standards on vehicle emissions. The state vowed to fight this. But a new report from the New York Times says California and officials from the Trump administration are in talks about possibly reaching a deal to avoid a legal fight.
      Speaking to a half-dozen of sources briefed about the talks, the Times reports that the two parties, along with representatives of major automakers, "are searching for a compromise that could save a uniform set of standards for the entire country." 
      One of the proposals on the table is to keep the Obama fuel economy standards, but allow automakers to take advantage of more generous loopholes to meet them. In turn, the Trump administration would honor California's wavier through 2030. There could be other proposals in the cards as the EPA, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, and the White House begin to coordinate their various strategies.
      There are a number of obstacles that could derail the talks. Various automakers "are in different positions” on how to proceed with the talks. According to a source, some are focused on rolling back the standards through 2025, while others want to have the discussion to reach a compromise to avoid having to build vehicles to different standards. The talks themselves seem to be spinning their wheels. Last week, William Wehrum, the EPA's senior clean air adviser met with Mary D. Nichols, chairwoman of the California Air Resources Board. Depending on who you ask, the meeting didn't amount to anything or was considered to be productive.
      Source: New York Times

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      In a move that was expected to happen soon, the EPA announced that it plans to revise the fuel-efficiency regulations that were approved during the President Obama administration. 
      “The Obama EPA’s determination was wrong. Obama’s EPA cut the midterm evaluation process short with politically charged expediency, made assumptions about the standards that didn’t comport with reality and set the standards too high,” said EPA chief Scott Pruitt in a statement today. 
      The statement goes on to say that the agency will begin working on new standards for cars for 2022-2025 with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.
      The regulations that were finalized during Obama's tenure would require automakers to have fuel economy fleet average of over 50 mpg by 2025. Automakers have been pushing for the standards to be rolled back as it would cause vehicles to become more expensive, and consumers aren't buying fuel-efficient vehicles.
      “This was the right decision. To ensure ongoing fuel economy improvement, the wisest course of action is to keep new vehicles affordable so more consumers can replace an older car with a new vehicle that uses much less fuel -- and offers more safety features," said Gloria Bergquist, a spokeswoman for the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers - a trade group that represents a dozen automakers including GM and Ford.
      Unsurprisingly, this move has brought forth criticism from both consumer and environmental groups.
      “EPA’s decision defies the robust record and years of review that show these targets are reasonable and appropriate,” said David Friedman, director of cars and products policy and analysis for Consumers Union, the advocacy division of Consumer Reports.
      “Undermining these consumer protections will cost consumers more at the pump while fulfilling the wishes of the auto industry.”
      The EPA also announced that it was considering revoking California's waiver that allows it to set its own emission rules that are tougher than the federal regulations. Aside from California, 12 other states have adopted these standards that together account for a third of car sales in the U.S.  Since President Donald Trump entered the white house, the relationship between the EPA and California has become very strained. California officials have vowed to fight back if the EPA goes forward.
      Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required)
  • My Clubs

  • Recently Browsing

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Who's Online (See full list)

About us

CheersandGears.com - Founded 2001

We ♥ Cars

Get in touch

Follow us

Recent tweets

facebook

×