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William Maley

BMW News: Rumorpile: BMW to Show an Electric 3-Series at Frankfurt

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It is no secret that German automakers are busy developing vehicles to challenge the Tesla Model S and X. But there has been barely a peep about something to take on the Model 3. But that is changing according to a report from Germany’s Handelsblatt.

Sources at BMW tell the publication that the company will be showing off a 3-Series electric at the Frankfurt Motor Show later this year. The model is said to have a range of 248 miles (400 km) and will directly compete against the upcoming Model 3. BMW declined to comment on this report.

The report doesn't say if this new electric will be based on the current or next 3-Series. Our hunch is that it will be the next-generation as it will be making its debut sometime next year. The model that could be shown at Frankfurt could be a concept to give us some idea of what BMW has planned.

Nevertheless, we will be keeping a close watch on this story.

Source: Handelsblatt (Subscription Required)


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16 minutes ago, A Horse With No Name said:

Sweet.;..about damn time!

Yes might be interesting is the new 3 series is truly an ICE / EV platform. Yet with that, I do still wonder about using that kind of platform for EV's as there are plenty of limitations on an EV. I have to think they would lose considerable trunk space or internal space using an ICE platform.

I get the cost associated with a pure EV platform like BMW did with the i Series as carbon fiber is not cheap. Yet, battery packaging has not changed that much that you could get a 400km pack into an ICE platform without giving up something. To me that would have to be trunk space, interior space and harder back seats.

I am excited but also wondering what this will be as I think the challenges are going to be great for BMW.

Maybe kill off 1/3 of their low volume auto's and put that R&D into a true EV product line.

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Would be better to have a platform designed from the ground up for EVs, such as their competitor from Stuttgart is doing.  

You wonder why they don't just take the i3 chassis and make a sedan out of it and call that the 3-series EV.  I would they could make it look like a regular 3-series.

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1 minute ago, smk4565 said:

I would they could make it look like a regular 3-series.

They can, but the OEMs seem to be helplessly locked into making EVs strange, ungainly pods, screaming they run on volts. I don't know if it's an effort to 'protect' the IC cars because OEMs survive on conservative business models and EV sales are a trickle. EVs don't cut different external proportions at the hard points, for the most part. Fiskar/Tesla for example.

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2 hours ago, smk4565 said:

Would be better to have a platform designed from the ground up for EVs, such as their competitor from Stuttgart is doing.  

You wonder why they don't just take the i3 chassis and make a sedan out of it and call that the 3-series EV.  I would they could make it look like a regular 3-series.

I saw another story with BMW engineering interview that the design of the i3 did not lend itself to be lengthened or changed outside of the current style. In other words, they designed a great car with limited flexibility from an expansion of models standpoint. I suspect BMW thought the EV market would not change the way that it did and they would still have a niche high priced product for years to come. Sadly that has changed overnight. Bolt bit them hard.

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They need a scalable EV architecture that can be used for sedan, coupe, crossover, etc. It is almost easier because you can put all the batteries in the floor pan and a couple electric motors.  The packaging is better, so multiple body styles should be easy.

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50 minutes ago, smk4565 said:

They need a scalable EV architecture that can be used for sedan, coupe, crossover, etc. It is almost easier because you can put all the batteries in the floor pan and a couple electric motors.  The packaging is better, so multiple body styles should be easy.

Agree, I just do not understand the lack of BMW's understanding about the benefits of a pure EV platform. This smells of cost cutting and cheapness.

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1 minute ago, dfelt said:

Agree, I just do not understand the lack of BMW's understanding about the benefits of a pure EV platform. This smells of cost cutting and cheapness.

It is not like they lack for ATP...but that is OK...more Sales for Tesla and company...

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