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  • William Maley
    William Maley

    2019 Audi Q3 Gets Overhauled

      Woah, it actually has some style


    Today, Audi unveiled an all-new Q3 that should help it in what is becoming a very competitive class.

    The most apparent change is on the outside. Audi didn't go as subtile in the design as they have with previous models. The Q3 actually has some character with an edgier body, a large eight-bar grille from the Q8 crossover, and more pronounced fender flares. It is also slightly bigger than the outgoing Q3 - 3.8-inches longer, 0.7-inches wider, and rides on a 3.1-inch longer wheelbase. Step inside and you'll find a two-level dash design and the choice of either an 8.8-inch or 10.1-inch touchscreen, The driver faces a 10.25-inch digital instrument cluster, while a 12.3-inch display with Audi's Virtual Cockpit is optional.

    For the time being, Audi is detailing powertrains for the European model. There will be four engines - three gas and one diesel. All engines will be turbocharged inline-fours. There will be a six-speed manual and seven-speed dual-clutch available, along with Audi's quattro all-wheel drive.

    European markets will begin seeing the 2019 Q3 at dealers in November. Those in the U.S. will need to wait until next year to find out when it will go on sale and specs.

    Source: Audi


    The all-new Audi Q3: Delivering striking design, seamless technology, and thoughtful functionality to the entry SUV segment

    • Bigger dimensions, more comfort: compact SUV with outstanding everyday utility
    • New operating concept: digital displays and MMI touch display
    • Connected like the full-size segment: smart infotainment and clever assist systems

    INGOLSTADT, Germany, July 25, 2018 – The new Audi Q3 is a family SUV with great all-round talents. In the second generation it appears not only visually more self-confident, but also roomier and more versatile. Just like the Audi top-of-the-line models, it features a fully digital operating and display concept, extensive infotainment solutions and innovative assist systems. They enhance comfort, as does the further developed suspension. The new Audi Q3 will begin arriving at European dealerships in November 2018.

    Strength and presence: the exterior design
    The new Audi Q3 looks much sportier than its predecessor. Thanks to the striking Singleframe in octagon design, which is divided up by vertical bars, along with the large air inlets. They characterize the masculine front-end with its intensive play of light and shadow. The narrow headlights run inwards with their wedge shape. Audi supplies them in three versions through to Matrix LED technology whose adaptive high beam intelligently illuminates the road. The side view epitomizes the balance of the exterior design with the symmetrical lighting graphics of the headlights and rear lights. The shoulder line connects them from a styling perspective and provides an athletic overall impression with strong muscles over the wheel arches. The contours draw their inspiration from Audi’s quattro DNA and make the SUV seem even wider; the color-contrasting wheel arch trims emphasize the offroad look. Supported by a long roof edge spoiler, which also flanks the rear window at the side, the steeply raked D pillars of the body line also create an appearance of forward thrust.

    Driver-oriented and sporty: the interior
    Taut lines, three-dimensionally styled elements – the interior continues the design of the exterior and echoes in many ways the brand’s full-size models. The architecture harmonizes perfectly with the new operating concept. Its central element is the MMI touch display with its high-gloss black glass-look surround.

    Together with the air conditioning controls underneath, it is tilted ten degrees toward the driver. All displays, buttons and controls are located ergonomically. The comfortable seats provide a sporty position; the steering wheel is steeply angled accordingly.

    Generous and variable: the space concept
    Compared with its predecessor, the new Audi Q3 has grown in virtually all dimensions. It is 4,485 millimeters (14.7 ft) long, 1,856 millimeters (6.1 ft) wide and 1,585 millimeters (5.2 ft) high. Its wheelbase, which has been stretched by 77 millimeters (3.0 in), is spacious yet, at the same time, extremely versatile: The rear seats can be moved fore/aft by 150 millimeters 
    (5.9 in). Their three-way split backrests in the ratio 40:20:40 can be tilted in seven stages. Depending on the position of the rear seats and backrests, the luggage compartment capacity is between 530 and 1,525 liters (18.7-53.9 cu ft). The loading floor can be adjusted in three levels and the parcel shelf can be stowed underneath the floor if not needed. An electric tailgate, which can also be opened and closed with a kicking motion, is also available as an option.

    Digital world: controls and displays
    The operating and display concept of the SUV has been overhauled from the ground up – Audi has done away with the analog instruments. Even the standard specification includes a digital instrument cluster with a 10.25 inch screen diagonal, which the driver operates using the multifunction steering wheel. With the top-of-the-line equipment MMI navigation plus, the displays appear in the Audi virtual cockpit, which offers many additional functions. There is also a 10.1-inch touch display. As an option, the driver can choose the larger Audi virtual cockpit plus with three different views, including a new, particularly sporty display. The intuitive operating concept with its flat menu structure is supplemented by natural-language voice control. It also understands freely structured wording. The ingenious dialog manager asks questions if necessary, allows corrections, offers choices and defers to the speaker when interrupted.

    Intelligently connected: infotainment and Audi connect
    The top-of-the-line infotainment system in the Audi Q3 offers the same technical functions as in the higher segments. Its data transfer module supports the LTE Advanced standard with integrated Wi-Fi hotspot for the passengers’ mobile devices. The navigation system recognizes the driver’s preferences based on previous journeys, allowing it to generate suitable route suggestions. The Audi connect portfolio ideally supplements navigation guidance with traffic information online, the point-of-interest search and information on parking spaces and filling stations appearing directly in the navigation map. The Audi Q3 utilizes the Audi fleet’s swarm intelligence to forecast the availability of roadside parking space, to provide information on hazardous spots and current speed limits. Other options include Google Earth and the hybrid radio, which automatically switches between FM, DAB and the online stream to ensure optimum reception at all times. The voice control function accesses information stored in the vehicle as well as the detailed knowledge in the cloud to respond. The Audi Q3 is even more tightly integrated with the myAudi app. It seamlessly connects a smartphone to the car. The customer can, for instance, transfer navigation routes and the smartphone calendar to the MMI and locate where the Q3 is parked.

    A range of hardware modules supplement the infotainment portfolio, including the Audi phone box. It links the owner’s smartphone to the vehicle’s antenna and charges the phone inductively. The Audi smartphone interface links customers’ iOS and Android cell phones and places their Apple Car Play or Android Auto environment on the MMI display. The Bang & Olufsen Premium Sound System with virtual sound provides three-dimensional audio and drives a total of 15 loudspeakers.

    Convenience and safety: driver assistance systems
    The adaptive cruise assist is a highlight of the assist systems. It incorporates the functions of adaptive speed assist, traffic jam assist and active lane assist. In this way it assists the driver with longitudinal and lateral control – substantially enhancing comfort on long journeys in particular. The Audi Q3 makes maneuvering easier thanks to the four 360 degree cameras.

    They show on the large infotainment screen the SUV’s immediate surroundings. Here the driver can also follow the maneuvers completed by the park assist. The park assist steers the car automatically into and out of parking spaces. The driver only has to accelerate, brake and shift gears. If the driver wants to reverse out of a parallel parking space or a tight entrance, cross traffic assist is activated. The radar sensors, which the system uses to monitor the area behind the vehicle, also provide information to the standard-fit lane change warning. If the system detects a vehicle located in the blind spot or approaching quickly from the rear, a warning LED is lit in the relevant exterior mirror.

    Agility on- and offroad: engines and suspension
    As part of the sales launch, Audi is delivering the new Q3 with four engine versions, three gasoline and one diesel unit in combination with front-wheel or quattro drive. Their power outputs range from 110 kW (150 hp) to 169 kW (230 hp). All engines are four-cylinder direct injection units with turbocharging. They are powerful, refined and efficient. A six-speed manual transmission or a fast-shifting seven-speed S tronic is used to transmit the power. Offroad the permanent all-wheel drive delivers excellent driving pleasure with optimum traction and unshakable stability. Activated at the push of a button, the optional hill descent control maintains the preset speed on a steep downhill gradient. The driver can vary the characteristics of the Audi Q3 depending on the driving situation, road conditions or personal needs using the Audi drive select dynamic handling system with six profiles – from markedly comfortable, highly efficient through to out-and-out sporty. The system also influences the optional suspension with damper control where sensors measure the movements of all four wheels as well as the vehicle’s lateral and longitudinal acceleration and adjust the dampers as required. This results in enhanced driving dynamics with even more comfort. Alternatively, there is the sport suspension – standard with the S line exterior package – with tauter spring/damper tuning and progressive steering. Its ratio becomes increasingly direct with increasing steering angle, adding substantially to the light-footed handling of the new Audi Q3.

    The equipment, data and prices specified in this release refer to the model range offered in Germany. Subject to change without notice; errors and omissions excepted. U.S. model specifications to follow closer to launch in 2019.

    Edited by William Maley



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    Looks like a strong contender in the segment.  Interior looks pretty high quality and modern and the outside shape is like mini Bentayga, so that should play well.  I think they did a good job here.

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    I really like the current one and this steps it up a notch.  If I dreamed a dream we would be graced with the torque and efficiency of the diesel in America.  I was pricing these a few months ago and a decent one goes for around $37k... extremely competitive when you look at prices for other, much lesser CUVs from non-luxury marques.  The completely lackluster Envision comes glaringly into view.

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    2 hours ago, ocnblu said:

    I really like the current one and this steps it up a notch.  If I dreamed a dream we would be graced with the torque and efficiency of the diesel in America.  I was pricing these a few months ago and a decent one goes for around $37k... extremely competitive when you look at prices for other, much lesser CUVs from non-luxury marques.  The completely lackluster Envision comes glaringly into view.

    I have to disagree, at $37,000 you have a FWD stripped appliance Q3, you have to move into the mid $45K range to get an AWD proper luxury CUV. 

    The Envision is not Lackluster especially when you can pickup a near fully loaded one with discounts at $40k. I would take the ultra quiet Envision over the current Q3 on the market.

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    43 minutes ago, dfelt said:

    I have to disagree, at $37,000 you have a FWD stripped appliance Q3, you have to move into the mid $45K range to get an AWD proper luxury CUV. 

    The Envision is not Lackluster especially when you can pickup a near fully loaded one with discounts at $40k. I would take the ultra quiet Envision over the current Q3 on the market.

    Add 25% to the price of Envision. Basically Buick’s any discount worth considering the Envision for have been wiped out.

     

    and I kinda like that. A lot. I simply would never buy a Chinese made Cadillac or Buick like I would never buy a Chinese made Rolex. And I would never buy a Rolex. Why do that when I could buy a Shinola or some other home grown watch maker?

     

    (Chinese made Rolex don’t exist. At least I don’t know for sure)

    Edited by Suaviloquent

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    Chinese made Rolex watches would obviously be cheap knock offs (as if China would actually enforce intellectual property on a consistent basis). 

    I do wish that Buick would build the Envisions and Encores here in the USA.  I would actually buy an Envision.  I may have to consider a Terrain Denali or go straight to a Cadillac XT5 instead. 

    Yes I know that without China, Buick would be lying besides Oldsmobile in the automotive cemetery.  You cannot argue a 5:1 sales ratio for Buick in China's favor.

     

    Back to the Audi Q3: A lot of reviews I have seen online put the Audi Q5 as the best luxury crossover in its class, besting the XT5 and the Envision.  Does the Q3 do the same, or is that the job of the new one coming next year to the States?

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    6 hours ago, dfelt said:

    I have to disagree, at $37,000 you have a FWD stripped appliance Q3, you have to move into the mid $45K range to get an AWD proper luxury CUV. 

    The Envision is not Lackluster especially when you can pickup a near fully loaded one with discounts at $40k. I would take the ultra quiet Envision over the current Q3 on the market.

    dfelt, what are you talking about?  https://www.lancasteraudipa.com/new/Audi/2018-Audi-Q3-e67ebe330a0e0ae91e8b92158a98c368.htm

    https://www.lancasteraudipa.com/new/Audi/2018-Audi-Q3-026da4440a0e0a6b4da50c2a7db0ae93.htm

    https://www.lancasteraudipa.com/new/Audi/2018-Audi-Q3-8fcb917f0a0e0adf483107959ede02a8.htm

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    3 hours ago, ocnblu said:

    WOW, Clearly they must not sell well there as you cannot find one here that is AWD in that price range. Must be our tech boom that is keeping prices at msrp cause that pricing gets ya FWD. Interesting.

    If I was interested in one, it would even with having to pay sales tax make it worth the PTO time to go out of state, buy it and drive it back home.

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    10 hours ago, dfelt said:

    I have to disagree, at $37,000 you have a FWD stripped appliance Q3, you have to move into the mid $45K range to get an AWD proper luxury CUV. 

    The Envision is not Lackluster especially when you can pickup a near fully loaded one with discounts at $40k. I would take the ultra quiet Envision over the current Q3 on the market.

    The Envision is the size of a Q5 though.    The Cadillac XT3 that doesn't exist yet would be the competitor for the Q3, and I assume Cadillac will build something smaller than XT4 eventually.

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    New Q3 appears to be about 4-5 inches less in length than the XT4.  Will be interesting to see which version(s) of the 2.0T the Q3 gets in North America.

     

     

     

     

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    7 hours ago, dfelt said:

    WOW, Clearly they must not sell well there as you cannot find one here that is AWD in that price range. Must be our tech boom that is keeping prices at msrp cause that pricing gets ya FWD. Interesting.

    If I was interested in one, it would even with having to pay sales tax make it worth the PTO time to go out of state, buy it and drive it back home.

    dfelt, Autohaus Lancaster is a very old, and large, VW-Porsche-Audi dealership in my town and the MSRP are all quoted above the sale prices.  The discounts aren't yuge.  They sell well enough.

    Edited by ocnblu

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      Now we get to what the title implies: Who should get which car?
      Genesis G70 3.3T: This is the car you get if you are all about those stats and performance. The interior may be lacking a bit, but the standard features make up for that downfall. Its exterior styling is a bit bland so style gurus will want to look elsewhere. Otherwise, this is a wonderful job and I think Genesis should be proud. 8/10
      Volvo S60 T6: Simply put, this isn’t a sports sedan. Instead, it is a great long-distance cruiser with so many safety features it can almost drive itself. It has the best looking exterior and interior, but the infotainment system and droning engine let it down. Volvo is doing an amazing job creating beautiful looking vehicles, but I wish they didn’t only use 2.0-liter engines. 7/10
      Audi S5 Sportback: New, it’s the most expensive but as a used car, you can get one for a little over $50,000 with around 30,000 miles. Why get this? Because it’s all about that badge, baby! It does have a great interior and the best infotainment system. It ties the Volvo for a beautiful exterior as well. If you can find one as a certified pre-owned vehicle or CPO, you can save about $10,000. 8/10

      My personal favorite part: It’s performance facts time!
      Genesis G70 3.3T: Turbocharged 3.3-liter V6. Stats: 365 HP and 376-pound feet of torque. 0-60: 4.5 seconds.
      Volvo T6: Turbocharged and supercharged 2.0-liter incline 4. Stats: 316 HP and 295-pound feet of torque. 0-60: 5.9 seconds.
      Audi S5 Sportback: Turbocharged 3.0-liter V6.  349 HP and 369-pound feet of torque. 0-60: 4.5 seconds. 
      What is your opinion? Which car do you think would suit you, and do you own the Audi, Genesis, or Volvo? Leave a comment below.
       

      View full article
  • Posts

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    • "Just say yes" to Chandler's (AZ) IKEA.
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