• Sign in to follow this  
    Followers 0

    GM Plans On Importing CT6 Plug-In Hybrid from China


    • The Buick Envision isn't the only vehicle being exported from China

    General Motors has plans to import a second vehicle from China to the U.S. It's not another Buick, but the new Cadillac CT6 Plug-In Hybrid.

     

    Bloomberg spoke with Cadillac’s chief marketing officer, Uwe Ellinghaus who revealed that the plug-in version would only be built in China. The standard CT6 would be built in the U.S. Why build the CT6 Plug-In Hybrid in China? GM believes with government incentives that encourage people and businesses to buy plug-in hybrids, the market for CT6 Plug-In Hybrid will be much higher.

     

    “That will be the largest market for electrified vehicles. The next generation of fuel-economy rules in China will be quite stringent at the end of this decade and into the next,” said GM President Dan Ammann.

     

    Also, if GM was to build the CT6 Plug-In Hybrid here and import it to China, they would be facing heavy import taxes. Hence, it makes sense for Cadillac to build the hybrid in China and export to the U.S.

     

    The first GM vehicle that will be imported from China, the Buick Envision made its debut last week at the Detroit Auto Show.

     

    Source: Bloomberg

    0


    Sign in to follow this  
    Followers 0


    User Feedback




    This does not bother me and I think it will work well for GM. Eventually I hope that sales get to the point where they can justify building them here.

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    The first *GM vehicle to be imported from China will be the Buick Envision.  The Volvo S60 Inscription is already here and is imported from China.

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I dunno guys. I love the CT6.  I feel that luxury cars are one of the few cars even that we should expect to represent domestic manufacturing consistently all the time. 

     

    I'm okay with them building the CT6 for local consumption in other markets. Hell, that makes for an intelligent business case. 

     

    But if I had the coin, I'd vote powerfully and not get a plug-in CT6. And I thought there were competitive synergies with building Voltec based vehicles together in the same facility. Clearly, it isn't so. In fact, I want the plug-in to fail in North America, because I simply do not believe consumers of $90,000 plus flagship vehicles should pay for a Chinese made car from an American brand.

     

    I also don't like Audi for building their next North American facility in Mexico for its most profitable models. I just find all this off-shoring appalling. 

     

    And once you lose production, it's gone forever. Part of the blame has to be the noncompetitive organized labour. It's troubling to see them trade away much needed production of vehicles at home in exchange for some meager increases in job security and the production of vehicles that can only succeed in good times with low fuel prices combined. Basically, I think it was so short-sighted to allow production to be off-shored.

     

    Worst case scenario is to see just like the drug discovery industry is see the entire design, development and manufacturing of the cars themselves go along with them out of North America. 

    1

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    A Cadillac sold in the USA, made in China is sad.  I think this is the beginning of the slippery slope.  Envision and CT6, then in a few years it could be the Regal and LaCrosse, etc.  Once they start producing cars on the cheap in China they'll keep it going if they can get away with selling them.   I would not buy a Chinese made car.

    1

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    A Cadillac sold in the USA, made in China is sad.  I think this is the beginning of the slippery slope.  Envision and CT6, then in a few years it could be the Regal and LaCrosse, etc.  Once they start producing cars on the cheap in China they'll keep it going if they can get away with selling them.   I would not buy a Chinese made car.

    But I bet just about everything else you own is made in China. Love how the line is drawn because it is the company you DON'T prefer. Given that Benz has a Chinese facility or two, let me ask you a question. Say you had to move to China (call it job related) and you want to buy a new Benz there that you really like (a long wheelbase E-Class is made there) and that it happens to be made there. Would you buy it?

    Edited by surreal1272
    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    A Cadillac sold in the USA, made in China is sad.  I think this is the beginning of the slippery slope.  Envision and CT6, then in a few years it could be the Regal and LaCrosse, etc.  Once they start producing cars on the cheap in China they'll keep it going if they can get away with selling them.   I would not buy a Chinese made car.

     

    You would't buy a Cadillac build by Mercedes in the S-class factory, so I don't know what the big difference is to you....

    2

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    A Cadillac sold in the USA, made in China is sad.  I think this is the beginning of the slippery slope.  Envision and CT6, then in a few years it could be the Regal and LaCrosse, etc.  Once they start producing cars on the cheap in China they'll keep it going if they can get away with selling them.   I would not buy a Chinese made car.

     

     

    LMFAO.. U won't buy an AMERICAN CAR.. and if U did.. U'd put it down because it wasn't German..

     

    Its all laughable since U go out of your way to support a company only builds 2.. of its 17 vehicles in the United States. Ironically the S-Classes we see could possibly be assembled in India.. not just Sindelfingen, Germany

     

     

    As for the CT6Hybrid.. again.. makes sense. Volume will be low in the segment, especially looking at the competitors Hybrid makes such as the 7Series, S-Class, and Lexus LS Hybrid's sales. GM is smart to utilize its factories. I talked to someone close to the situation and they tell me that this is a situation where there is not profit sharing when they leave the country (China), as it is when they are sold inside.

    1

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I wouldn't move to China, just as I wouldn't buy a car made in China.  And I owned 2 American cars before the German one.  And before I bought my E-class I also drove a 2010 Genesis 4.6, 2010 CTS and 2010 or 11 MKZ.   The MKZ was obviously the worst car, felt like driving a Fusion, I did like the V8 aspect of the Genesis, but it was just too boring of a car, and the CTS just didn't have enough power form the 3.6, unless it was at 5,000 rpm.  So I didn't just default to a German car.  But I liked the E-class the best.

     

    I wonder how many cars GM decides to make in China and import.  This is the 2nd one, what if there is a 3rd, 4th, or 5th?

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    As explained in this article and the Envision ones, it's based on where the car will sell the most copies. They're only planning on selling 60k Envisions here, they sold 174k in China in 2015. The CT6 PHEV will likely be very low volume in the US, larger in China, but still relatively small. Makes sense to only have one production line for such a low volume vehicle.

    I expect Regal will move out of north America too eventually, but I could see that going back to Germany where they need the volume to fill the factory capacity. The Chinese bought nearly 100k Regals last year.

    2

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    So if the CTS has more sales in China than in the USA, should they move all CTS production to China as well?  I get why they are doing it with the Envision, they need a crossover yesterday and this is the fastest way to do it.  As far as the CT6 goes, they might sell 20 plug in hybrids a month, so I get not wanting factory tooling for that.  I just think if it works here, what is to top GM for building every Cruze in China and shipping it here?  Once you go down that road it is hard to turn back.

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I wouldn't move to China, just as I wouldn't buy a car made in China.  And I owned 2 American cars before the German one.  And before I bought my E-class I also drove a 2010 Genesis 4.6, 2010 CTS and 2010 or 11 MKZ.   The MKZ was obviously the worst car, felt like driving a Fusion, I did like the V8 aspect of the Genesis, but it was just too boring of a car, and the CTS just didn't have enough power form the 3.6, unless it was at 5,000 rpm.  So I didn't just default to a German car.  But I liked the E-class the best.

     

    I wonder how many cars GM decides to make in China and import.  This is the 2nd one, what if there is a 3rd, 4th, or 5th?

    You didn't answer my question. The key phase there was "if you HAD to move to China" and you side step that completely. That pretty much answers my question though. Thanks. :thumbsup:

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    So if the CTS has more sales in China than in the USA, should they move all CTS production to China as well?  I get why they are doing it with the Envision, they need a crossover yesterday and this is the fastest way to do it.  As far as the CT6 goes, they might sell 20 plug in hybrids a month, so I get not wanting factory tooling for that.  I just think if it works here, what is to top GM for building every Cruze in China and shipping it here?  Once you go down that road it is hard to turn back.

    You seem to lack a certain fundamental understanding of world economics. 

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    So if the CTS has more sales in China than in the USA, should they move all CTS production to China as well?

    IMO.. and to spite the American workers who go off and buy Foreign vehicles built by foreign labor.. I'd say YEAH.. Eff the American worker. They reap what they sow. U want GM and Ford to build exclusively in America.. then everyone in the American population needs to shun the Foreign makers and buy strictly GM and Ford, or at the very least.. only vehicle by Foreign companies made right here in the U.S. U can not give GM $h! for importing two vehicles, one very low volume, and not give Toyota $h! for importing the 100K+ Annual Prius from Japan. China or Japan.. same difference to me; feeding a mouth and putting food on a table that isn't AMERICAN

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    So if the CTS has more sales in China than in the USA, should they move all CTS production to China as well?  I get why they are doing it with the Envision, they need a crossover yesterday and this is the fastest way to do it.  As far as the CT6 goes, they might sell 20 plug in hybrids a month, so I get not wanting factory tooling for that.  I just think if it works here, what is to top GM for building every Cruze in China and shipping it here?  Once you go down that road it is hard to turn back.

     

    How do you walk around at work without bumping into things? Your vision is so narrow. 

     

    The CTS is built on the same production line as the ATS and Camaro.  Look at the total volume for those cars and that is why they won't move it to China.   The Envision doesn't share a platform with anything currently built in the US (I'm told it will be so different from the Terrain and 'Nox, that even sharing with them is still a question mark for GM).  The Regal would make sense to move to Germany because 1) Volumes are low. 2) Opel could use the extra production volume. 3) The Oshwa plant already has trouble making enough Chevy Equinoxes so freeing up space from Regal would allow greater 'Nox production. 4) It would cut Regal production plants from 3 to 2.

    1

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    If I had to live in China, no question I would buy the Cadillac made in China.

     

    I'd be the only way.

     

    But what we know is that the hamtramck plant will also build the Bolt. The batteries are coming from LG Chem from South Korea anyways.

     

    But...different markets have different needs at some levels. I object to any Cadillac flagship iteration being assembled in China to sell in America not because the product won't be up to the quality.

     

    I fear that people looking at moroney - and Cadillac is a whole should not put any reasons for people to be belligerent towards the cars it makes, especially a flagship product (even as a placeholder), because Cadillac is really going for it. 

     

    Or Cadillac can hedge their bets, and "fire" any customers that were looking to excuse themselves of excellent product because of bounded rationality and loyalty.

     

    The difference is, that we auto enthusiasts know the score. It makes utter absolute sense for Cadillac to source the car from where it'll sell most. Heck, Ford would've done that for the new Taurus, but probably didn't want the test the "Made in China" waters yet - or didn't want to be the first.

     

    Cadillac will have a hell of a time trying to get people to empathize with them if they nitpick against the place of origin of the CT6 plug-in. But because I do not see the value (the intangible ability to fully claim that the vehicle is fully American, the height of luxury built by Americans, for Americans) being delivered through this arguably wise financial decision... I have to say I would not buy the plug-in.

     

    I'd surely get the 3.0TT Platinum this, check box that, sign here please, Thank you Thursday... thank you.

    1

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I just think once you build 2 cars in China, it is easy to build 3 or 4, and then they are going down that road.

     

    Johan told Car and Driver that they are working on a 4.2 liter bi-turbo V8 with upper 400s horsepower for the CT6.  They need that ASAP, and I'd actually like to see them put that in the CTS V-sport and ATS-V.  Then the 3.0 TT V6 can be the mid-level engine in the CTS and ATS, and the 2.0T would be the base engine.  Then you don't really need the 3.6 V6 anymore, and Cadillac sedans would be all turbo.  

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I thinking that the HP rating he gave us was buckus. Why building a turbo 4.2l v8 with 460+ when the LF4 already boasts almost 470hp with a smaller displacement. I think this engine will be in the 500 range.

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I thinking that the HP rating he gave us was buckus. Why building a turbo 4.2l v8 with 460+ when the LF4 already boasts almost 470hp with a smaller displacement. I think this engine will be in the 500 range.

    I agree, I think he was just blowing smoke for now and expect the twin turbo V8 to be near 600HP when it comes out, no less than 550HP.

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    This sounds like it is a model turbo V8 and such an engine does have a place in the line-up in base trim.  That doesn't mean it can't be tuned up higher from there.

     

    Based on the Hp/L Cadillac is getting out of the 3.6, the 4.2 should be in the 540 range when maxed out. I have a suspicion that the number will be 500... exactly. 500 has been a magical number for Cadillac before. 

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I think the car will be an incredible achievement in technical aspects.

     

    But I think the car does not communicate its purpose so well. I just look at this as another luxury bruiser. But in reality it is a full sized luxury Corvette. So people may still try to gauge the conventional aspects of the car - such as interior quality and overall styling over the dynamic aspects.

     

    And really, the Buick Lacrosse, no, just even the Chevy Impala are excellent enough driving large sedans.

     

    Even ConsumerReport's resident Mercedes-lover, the guy with slickster hair, always wears a tasteful sweater and accent akined the driving dynamics of the Impala to (If I recall correctly) an current gen E-Class. That's good enough in my books, to say the least.

     

    So how much more are people really willing to pay for a better driving car... that is up in the question books. Because the traditional "driver's cars" have regressed in that respect to focus on overall luxury.

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I think the car will be an incredible achievement in technical aspects.

     

    But I think the car does not communicate its purpose so well. I just look at this as another luxury bruiser. But in reality it is a full sized luxury Corvette. So people may still try to gauge the conventional aspects of the car - such as interior quality and overall styling over the dynamic aspects.

     

    And really, the Buick Lacrosse, no, just even the Chevy Impala are excellent enough driving large sedans.

     

    Even ConsumerReport's resident Mercedes-lover, the guy with slickster hair, always wears a tasteful sweater and accent akined the driving dynamics of the Impala to (If I recall correctly) an current gen E-Class. That's good enough in my books, to say the least.

     

    So how much more are people really willing to pay for a better driving car... that is up in the question books. Because the traditional "driver's cars" have regressed in that respect to focus on overall luxury.

     

     

     

    I've been bombarded with this comparison before.. many times. My Impala is constantly thought to be a luxury car. It is constantly challenged by Es and 5s.. GSs and even ugly Equus. Each on have been seriously taken aback.. or had their asses busted.

     

    The Driving capabilities of Epsilon II are just too great to ignore. U just can't do it. Even without MRC they are hands down some of the, if not the, best handling FWD cars on the market. I don't kno what the hell GM was thinking when engineering these vehicles but the result was my Impala can out-handle many RWD tuned application no issue. Even more scary is that the Regal GS and Malibu LTZ... is even more competent. 

     

    To the CT6; I believe that when the embargo lifts next week and U start seeing test drives of the vehicle we will be in awe. If all Cadillac did was transfer the ability of the CTS over to this car it would still be best in class handling.. couple in the size being as large as any of the German 3, with even more tuned, technological capabilities, such as RW-Steering (I will adapt to RWS) and U have a game change.. BEFORE the CT7 and 8 even arrive. That's something. 

     

    I am seriously hoping reviewers, when testing and doing comparos, will put aside their prejudice and preconceived notions about the car not being an "S-Class competitor.." IT IS. Again in the same way the Panamera and XJ are.. and to an extent the LS460.. this car is an S-Class competitor BEFORE the actual S-Class competitor arrives. That's saying something. The question to ponder is; If this is 95% of what the S-Class is supposed to be.. what the EFF does Cadillac have in mind for the CT8?

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I think the car will be an incredible achievement in technical aspects.

     

    But I think the car does not communicate its purpose so well. I just look at this as another luxury bruiser. But in reality it is a full sized luxury Corvette. So people may still try to gauge the conventional aspects of the car - such as interior quality and overall styling over the dynamic aspects.

     

    And really, the Buick Lacrosse, no, just even the Chevy Impala are excellent enough driving large sedans.

     

    Even ConsumerReport's resident Mercedes-lover, the guy with slickster hair, always wears a tasteful sweater and accent akined the driving dynamics of the Impala to (If I recall correctly) an current gen E-Class. That's good enough in my books, to say the least.

     

     

    So how much more are people really willing to pay for a better driving car... that is up in the question books. Because the traditional "driver's cars" have regressed in that respect to focus on overall luxury.

     

    A lot of luxury cars sell well, and the luxury market overall seems to be growing.  People pay $85k for a Cadillac version of the Tahoe, just like people will pay $40k for a BMW 3-series that is the same size a a $20,000 Mazda 3.  I think there are always people willing to pay more money for more performance or more luxury.  A Camaro can do 90% of what a Corvette can do, but they still sell 30,000 Corvettes a year.

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I'm not so sure the CT6 will be a game changer, or even do a whole lot to steal from the Germans or Lexus.  But I am quite interested to read the reviews and see the test drive videos, and see the comparisons.

    1

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites



    Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

    Guest
    You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
    Add a comment...

    ×   You have pasted content with formatting.   Remove formatting

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor




  • Popular Stories

  • Today's Birthdays

    1. aaaantoine
      aaaantoine
      (34 years old)
  • Similar Content

    • By William Maley
      The CEOs of Detroit's three automakers met with President Donald Trump this morning to talk about investments. Specifically, investments into U.S. manufacturing. 
      "We have a very big push on to have auto plants and other plants -- many other plants," Trump told reporters at the meeting. “We’re going to make the process much more simple for the oil companies and everybody else that wants to do business in the United States.”
      During the meeting, Trump told the CEOs that he plans on cutting corporate tax rates to 15-20 percent, and reduce regulations by 75 percent.
      “We think we can cut regulations by 75 percent. Maybe more. When you want to expand your plant, or when Mark wants to come in and build a big massive plant, or when Dell wants to come in and do something monstrous and special -- you’re going to have your approvals really fast,” said Trump. 
      One regulation that is likely going to be shown the door are the EPA's 2025 fuel economy regulations which were set in stone during the final days of President Obama's tenure. Automakers have been asking President Trump to rethink the aggressive mandates set by the agency.
      “I am, to a large extent, an environmentalist. I believe in it. But, it’s out of control,” said Trump.
      After the meeting, Ford CEO Mark Fields seemed the most upbeat when speaking to reporters.
       "As an industry we're excited about working together with the president," said Fields.
      GM CEO Mary Barra said she sees a “huge opportunity” with working with the president to “improve the environment, improve safety and improve job creation.” FCA CEO Sergio Marchionne was less enthused than the other two, stating the meeting was a positive one.
      Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required), Detroit Free Press

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      The CEOs of Detroit's three automakers met with President Donald Trump this morning to talk about investments. Specifically, investments into U.S. manufacturing. 
      "We have a very big push on to have auto plants and other plants -- many other plants," Trump told reporters at the meeting. “We’re going to make the process much more simple for the oil companies and everybody else that wants to do business in the United States.”
      During the meeting, Trump told the CEOs that he plans on cutting corporate tax rates to 15-20 percent, and reduce regulations by 75 percent.
      “We think we can cut regulations by 75 percent. Maybe more. When you want to expand your plant, or when Mark wants to come in and build a big massive plant, or when Dell wants to come in and do something monstrous and special -- you’re going to have your approvals really fast,” said Trump. 
      One regulation that is likely going to be shown the door are the EPA's 2025 fuel economy regulations which were set in stone during the final days of President Obama's tenure. Automakers have been asking President Trump to rethink the aggressive mandates set by the agency.
      “I am, to a large extent, an environmentalist. I believe in it. But, it’s out of control,” said Trump.
      After the meeting, Ford CEO Mark Fields seemed the most upbeat when speaking to reporters.
       "As an industry we're excited about working together with the president," said Fields.
      GM CEO Mary Barra said she sees a “huge opportunity” with working with the president to “improve the environment, improve safety and improve job creation.” FCA CEO Sergio Marchionne was less enthused than the other two, stating the meeting was a positive one.
      Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required), Detroit Free Press
    • By William Maley
      China has given Cadillac a bit of breathing room when it comes to sales and working on filling out their lineup. Automotive News reports overall sales of Cadillac vehicles in the U.S. dropped 3 percent, while sales in China rose 46 percent. 
      "We are moving Cadillac from having this very strong U.S.-centric focus to having a global focus. The time will come when we will sell more Cadillacs in China than here," said Cadillac President Johan de Nysschen in an interview.
      With sales going up in China, this gives the brand some flexibility from transitioning a sedan-heavy lineup to adding more crossovers beginning in mid-2018 for the U.S. Currently, the XT5 serves as the brand's sole crossover and best-selling model (2016 saw 39,485 XT5s sold). Not a good thing since light trucks currently account for 60 percent of total U.S. car sales.
      "The majority of our portfolio is exposed to downdraft, while we can't really capitalize adequately on all the opportunities that exist with the swing of demand into crossovers. Now, this will be remedied, of course, over time as we expand our portfolio, but in the meantime it is our reality," said de Nysschen.
      Dealers though don't get to have that breathing space. An 18-month window without any new products is making them very anxious. 
      "We're in the retail business. We live and breathe month to month and weekend to weekend. There is a lot of product out there on the horizon, but nothing very soon," said Bill Wallace, owner of Wallace Cadillac in Stuart, Florida.
      The next product is expected to a compact crossover known as the XT3, due in mid-2018.
      Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required)
      Pic Credit: William Maley for Cheers & Gears

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      China has given Cadillac a bit of breathing room when it comes to sales and working on filling out their lineup. Automotive News reports overall sales of Cadillac vehicles in the U.S. dropped 3 percent, while sales in China rose 46 percent. 
      "We are moving Cadillac from having this very strong U.S.-centric focus to having a global focus. The time will come when we will sell more Cadillacs in China than here," said Cadillac President Johan de Nysschen in an interview.
      With sales going up in China, this gives the brand some flexibility from transitioning a sedan-heavy lineup to adding more crossovers beginning in mid-2018 for the U.S. Currently, the XT5 serves as the brand's sole crossover and best-selling model (2016 saw 39,485 XT5s sold). Not a good thing since light trucks currently account for 60 percent of total U.S. car sales.
      "The majority of our portfolio is exposed to downdraft, while we can't really capitalize adequately on all the opportunities that exist with the swing of demand into crossovers. Now, this will be remedied, of course, over time as we expand our portfolio, but in the meantime it is our reality," said de Nysschen.
      Dealers though don't get to have that breathing space. An 18-month window without any new products is making them very anxious. 
      "We're in the retail business. We live and breathe month to month and weekend to weekend. There is a lot of product out there on the horizon, but nothing very soon," said Bill Wallace, owner of Wallace Cadillac in Stuart, Florida.
      The next product is expected to a compact crossover known as the XT3, due in mid-2018.
      Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required)
      Pic Credit: William Maley for Cheers & Gears
    • By William Maley
      This morning, General Motors announced that it would be investing $1 billion into their manufacturing operations in the U.S. The investment will go towards “new vehicle, advanced technology and component projects,” that will create or retain 1,500 jobs. GM also announced that it would create at least 5,000 more jobs in the U.S. for various parts of their business, and insource the production of axles for their next-generation of full-size trucks to create 450 jobs.
      Announcements on where the investments will go will be announced at a later date.
       
      “As the U.S. manufacturing base increases its competitiveness, we are able to further increase our investment, resulting in more jobs for America and better results for our owners. The U.S. is our home market and we are committed to growth that is good for our employees, dealers, and suppliers and supports our continued effort to drive shareholder value,” said GM Chairman and CEO Mary Barra in a statement.
      This news comes on the heels of comments made by President-elect Donald Trump on possibly imposing a 35 percent tariff on vehicles built in Mexico. According to NBC News, various General Motors officials stress these moves were months, and some years in the making.
      Source: General Motors, NBC News
      Press Release is on Page 2


      GM Announces 7,000 U.S. Jobs, Builds Off Strong Track Record
      Investing Additional $1 Billion in U.S. Manufacturing Moves Axle Jobs to U.S. from Mexico More than 5,000 New Jobs in Key Growth Areas    DETROIT – General Motors today announced that it will invest an additional $1 billion in U.S. manufacturing operations. These investments follow $2.9 billion announced in 2016 and more than $21 billion GM has invested in its U.S. operations since 2009.
      The new investments cover multiple new vehicle, advanced technology and component projects. A combination of 1,500 new and retained jobs are tied to the new investments. Details of individual projects will be announced throughout the year.
      The company also announced it will begin work on insourcing axle production for its next generation full-size pickup trucks, including work previously done in Mexico, to operations in Michigan, creating 450 U.S. jobs.
      “As the U.S. manufacturing base increases its competitiveness, we are able to further increase our investment, resulting in more jobs for America and better results for our owners,”  said GM Chairman and CEO Mary Barra. “The U.S. is our home market and we are committed to growth that is good for our employees, dealers, and suppliers and supports our continued effort to drive shareholder value.”
      GM’s announcement is part of the company’s increased focus on overall efficiency over the last four years. With a strategy to streamline and simplify its operations and grow its business, GM has created 25,000 jobs in the U.S. − approximately 19,000 engineering, IT and professional jobs and 6,000 hourly manufacturing jobs – and added nearly $3 billion in annual wages and benefits to the U.S. economy over that period. At the same time, GM reduced more than 15,000 positions outside the U.S., bringing most of those jobs to America. During that period, the company moved from 90 percent of its IT work being outsourced to an insourced U.S.-based model.
      “We will continue our commitment to driving a more efficient business,” said Barra, “as shown by our insourcing of more than 6,000 IT jobs that were formerly outside the U.S., streamlining our engineering operations from seven to three, with the core engineering center being in Warren, Michigan, and building on our momentum at GM Financial and in advanced technologies.  These moves, and others, are expected to result in more than 5,000 new jobs in the U.S. over the next few years.”
      GM has also been facilitating its supplier base to do the same. The company has been executing a strategy to create supplier parks adjacent to its U.S. manufacturing sites (already accomplished at GM’s Fairfax Assembly Plant in Kansas, Spring Hill Assembly Plant in Tennessee, Fort Wayne Assembly Plant in Indiana, and Lordstown Assembly Plant in Ohio), and will continue to expand this effort. Supplier parks locating near assembly plants result in significant savings from reduced transportation costs, higher quality communications and continuous improvement activities as suppliers are located closer to the final assembly location.
      In addition, GM is confirming that another supplier has committed to make components for GM’s next-generation full size pick-up trucks in Michigan, moving 100 supplier jobs from Mexico to the U.S.

      View full article
  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)