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    One and Done: Cadillac ELR


    • Cadillac's Plug-In Hybrid Will Not Be Returning for a Second-Generation

    As many of us suspected for a while, Cadillac has decided to not go forth with a second-generation ELR plug-in hybrid.

     

    "I plan to continue admiring it as one of the most beautiful cars on four wheels. But we don't plan further investment" in the coupe, Cadillac CEO Johan de Nysschen told reporters at a media event for the CT6.

     

    de Nysschen went on to say the ELR will still be sold as long as people want to buy it.

     

    Previously, Automotive News reported the ELR would stick around till 2018.

     

    The ELR was a victim of bad decisions. A key one pointed out by dealers was the starting price of $75,995 caused demand to drop sharply. For the 2016 model year, Cadillac slashed the price by $10,000.

     

    Cadillac's marketing chief, Uwe Ellinghaus called the ELR a 'big disappointment' in an interview with Automobile Magazine, causing many to think the ELR's days were numbered.

     

    Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required)

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    Naw, Use the tech they have learned from the VOLT and BOLT and Build a True XT5 EV with 300 mile range and give Tesla a run for it's money. This should be on dealer lots by 2018.

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    I know it did bad because of pricing...

     

    But the Cadillac we want will eventually be making these kinds of vehicles, just better executed. Maybe not as coupes, not yet anyhow.

     

    I love the styling though, and to me it's a discount BMW i8 with discount performance. It gets better FE in gas heavy regen mode too.

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    I, for one, aint sad to see it go.

    Good riddance is what I say.

     

    Get lost! Scram!

     

    I, however, cant wait to see what the CT6 'e' version has to offer.

    And maybe from there, Cadillac could pick up the electric pieces and start fresh for an EV halo car sometime in the future.

     

    There are a couple of these roaming the streets near my home and restaurant, and I must admit, its striking to see in real life. Nice car it is, bad pricing and maybe even a tad bad execution.

     

    Oh well. Chalk it up to yet another modern Cadillac failure and quickly move on. There is no need to dwell on it as some great products are on the way.

     

    Just to add to more drama to my post, I wanna take the time to add, that although I like the ELR, I dont have any passion for it. I prefer the Allante over this.

    Strange but true!

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    Good move to kill it. They should have made a Voltec crossover instead. They still could, but at sub $2 gas that is a hard sell. Maybe an XT3 with Voltec around $42k could sell.

    Cadillac needs crossovers in a bad way.

    If the CT6 plug in is more than $59k it won't sell. I mean the CT6 will be low volume anyway, but the hybrid will be like 20 cars a month if they try to price it much more than the base V6.

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    Naw, Use the tech they have learned from the VOLT and BOLT and Build a True XT5 EV with 300 mile range and give Tesla a run for it's money. This should be on dealer lots by 2018.

     

     

    But with such a large frontal area would the range take a big hit? Aero has been a big part of the range of the Volt so how much would it kille the range? also if you load one with cargo how much would it vary the range and make it more difficult to give an expected range. This is why i do not think we have seen a Chevy CUV version of the Volt yet. 

     

    If they do a cross over I expect it will come only after more work is done with the batteries. Lets face it the Tesla X is pretty much a S model just slightly taller. It is far from the frontal area of most CUV models 

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    This was announced months ago. Bottom line is that the ELR at $75K was fine IF Cadillac only wanted to sell them to niche buyers. They didn't. They FAILED to sell the intended 3000 (last year about 1/2 of that) units annually because they did nothing to market this car after "Poolside" (LOVED POOLSIDE!!!) went viral and let's be honest, its a 2-seater (eff the back seat in any of these sports coupes/Verts from Cadillac to Benz), it has no sunroof, which is insane considering the market for this car would seemingly be the well-to-do, Silicon Valley, greenie types who love to show up in something sexy that lets's their hair blow around in the wind. 

     
    This car.. THIS CAR.. should have been a sub-ATS sports car, with a convertible roof or sunroof having coupe, with a TT 2.0L 270HP and 350HP VSeries version, and ta hell with EV. The Voltec should have gone in the XTS. The XTS, with Voltec would have made sense. The XTS with Voltec would have added numbers in the realm of what Tesla sell because it would be in a car that could actually seat 5, maybe 6, with a trunk that could house a bunch of Golf Clubs.

     

     

     No it was not a wasted opportunity. What it was was a waste of time. Basically there should have never been an ELR, as beautiful as it is... especially when you had the new Voltec powertrain sitting in the wings getting ready to come out in the CT6. Fact is... ELR should have been the ATS coupe or sub ATS sports car with a normal power train

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    Shame.. because it's actually a fantastic car for what it was intended to be.  It was just priced too high.   I could be completely tempted by one once deprecation does its thing.

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    Ah yes....Poolside, and no follow up to that.

     

    Double and triple yes to the sub-ATS comment Casa.

     

    Maybe Cadillac could do a follow up to Poolside by sending off the ELR with the song  Wasted days and Wasted Nights!

     

    Im on my tablette so you folk are spared any youtube links I was about to post!

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    Well Drew the problem is it was a good car not a great car. 

    It was another perfect example of where you can take a Cadillac and dumb it down to a Chevy like the Camaro but you can not take a Chevy and beef it up to be a Cadillac so well. 

     

    The car just was not to the level of a Cadillac or what a Cadillac should have been. It was not leading in technology as it was the same thing Chevy had been selling for several years at a lower price. 

    It had a great design but like the SSR and even the last Camaro it has compromises because it catered to design more than ergonomics. 

     

    Yes it will be a great buy on the used car market and may even be a great car to collect as it truly is a low production car. 

    I would love to see someone take one dump the battery and put in a LNF Turbo Eco. That would be an interesting engine swap. 

     

    The ELR as for being a waste of time? Well that is a glass half full or a glass half empty deal. To some they may consider it a waste of time. Well Cadillac really did not lose much as the car did not take much time or money to finish since it used off the shelf parts and a design that was pretty much done. As for did it accomplish much with that time not really. I call it a draw. Other than some negative press from the critics they did not lose or gain much here. 

     

    To be honest it at least got people talking Cadillac when the XTS was all we had to talk about. 

     

    This work in progress takes time and patients.  

    The way I see Cadillac is I relate them to the Cleveland Browns. For years they were mismanaged and really un-cared for properly. GM put people in charge that really should not have been in charge as they were insiders that just took orders and did not fix much. 

     

    Now like the Cleveland Browns they have a new Coach. This time it is not a first time coach. He is well liked and respected. This in turn has attracted some real talent for his staff for once. We have three guys now that have been a head coach at one point and they were not bad where they were. 

    As for the NFL it is much like the auto industry and pretty mediocre. To go from the bottom to the top does not really take much anymore as the top teams are not untouchable anymore. The perenials like Dallas, Washington, SF and others are not like they once were a given to be there at the end. Teams like Charlotte can go from no where to the Super Bowl in a couple years. Even the worst team can go from last to the play offs in one year. 

    I see the same for Cadillac. They finally have leaders that know a bit about the industry no first time insiders. They have the money needed to pay for the needed changes. They only need the time to get the product out. Unlike the NFL where you can put a new product on the field any year cars take a little longer. 

     

    Now Cleveland may still never get to the Super Bowl but at least they appear to be competent and headed in the right direction. I expect in 2 years to make the play offs. They are getting rid of past sins like first time coaches and Johnny Football. I see Cadillac as the same. Not a bad team but they needed to fix some things and they will be at least competitive and profitable. 

     

    The ELR was just a car that was not really handled right and was at a time that Cadillac may have not made some good choices. They did not lose much in the deal but did not get much either.

     

    I expect to see a true Tesla like plug in at some point. Possibly in the Omega and it will be done right. While it may share some GM tech with Chevy it will never be confused with the Chevy or even sharing. Now if it does share it will be passed down to Chevy not up to Cadillac.

     

    I am ok they did this car the only thing I regret is it did not help Cadillac as much as it was hoped. I can't say I was surprised as I expected so much.  It was just not different from the Volt enough to make it matter. GM and Cadillac has moved on and I expect those in side that did not know better do now. 

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    Too high a cost and not enough power too

    much for the design and fantastic interior to overcome. Too much under the skin commonality with the first-gen Volt too.

    Edited by El Kabong
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    I appreciated the sports analogy Hyper.

    I feel the need to explain my point of view of why I dont feel bad about the ELR going away.

     

    The ELR...falls into the same trap as every other GM produced car that was killed off way before it should have, but its like GM had no choice to kill them off because the cars were released half baked...

     

    The Fiero comes to mind.

    The Chevy SSR.

    Cadillac's own XLR.

    Even the Allante and its sister ship the Buick Reatta.

     

    Ill take a different approach here than Hyper's approach about wasted time. (Casa thinks it was wasted time and Hyper does not believe it to be)

    And even Casa's approach about he not seeing it as a wasted opportunity but as wasted time.

     

    I think it was a COLOSSAL wastage of time and an even bigger wasted opportunity.

    True that it may not have cost Cadillac that much money....but technically it cost Cadillac time....and time IS money.

    Because although it may NOT have set Cadillac back, but it did NOT move Cadillac FORWARD either, and Cadillac NEEDS to MOVE FORWARD in LEAPS and BOUNDS whenever possible, then the ELR experiment DID cost them time and...yeah...opportunity.

    Remember....Cadillac STILL does not have that wow factor car to put asses in the seats of said car...

     

    POOLSIDE promised us THAT type of Cadillac car...to go with that type of arrogant lifestyle Americans like to talk about....

    You know...the American dream....

    NOT taking off for vacation the full month of August...

    Working hard to achieve whatever tinkles our fancy...

    You know....putting man on the moon because...well the U.S. is the GREATEST country on earth and phoque it! Americans left the keys to the GM car on the moon because Americans are the only ones to go back there!

     

    And what kind of car did Neal McDonough drive off in the sunset so to speak?

    Yeah...THE CADILLAC ELR....but that Cadillac gets nixed...because NOBODY bought the damned thing, because NOBODY saw it like they still see an Eldorado! 

     

    Big waste of time and opportunity.

    This Poolside commercial just BEGGED for an incredible arrogant, badass Cadillac.

    It should have been the Escalade in the commercial because an El Miraj still does not exist!

    Hold on... a 'V' Series Cadillac would have been better.

     

    Its true what Casa says...

    JDN is searching for a sub-ATS car.

    A non-electric ELR with a 2.0T making 270-300 horsepower and a 'V' variant making north of 350 is that answer....

     

    Yup...2- 3 years have gone by with the ELR plus another 3-5  years for that sub-ATS called the CT3 to arrive IS wasted time and wasted opportunity...because that sub-ATS/CT3 was needed YESTERDAY....and THAT car could have ALSO fit nicely in the poolside commercial...All 'V' variant Cadillacs actually.

     

    If the ELR is FWD only, maybe they could have found a way to make it AWD to distinguish it from  the Chevy/Buick/Opel  Delta II platform.

     

    And THAT is why I dont feel bad for the ELR...

     

    Because the true believers at Cadillac were not in charge at that point in time when the ELR was given the green light.

    The ELR, like I mentioned before...and so has Hyper, is just another half-baked, poorly marketed GM vehicle that GM has a history of doing...

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    The XLR died because it was a Corvette, more or less. Not an enormous investment for Cadillac, but not a good idea. Even BMW largely avoids attacking the Benz SL head on, although I guess a 6-Series Droptop kinda fits the role.

    The ELR wasn't a missed opportunity so much as it was an opportunity compromised by the fact that it was a trickle-up idea. And it doesn't matter who pushes trickle-up ideas, they rarely work in today's automotive marketplace.

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    I get the XLR part being a Corvette...never a good idea to sell a car with less horsepower, crappier interior (Im not necessarily talking about quality either) and COSTLIER than a car that its based on, especially a holy grail of a car that it was actually based on.

     

    It still doesnt change the fact that the XLR was still half-baked...

    It could have been a much better effort.

     

    Bulgari....or I should right it as Bvlgari...did the clock and the dashboard gauges...

     

    Yikes!!! :scared:

     

    That is about as perfect of an adjective  I could think of in describing Bvgalri's work on the XLR.

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    They overpaid Bulgari for the gauges. But I have fonder memories of the interior, especially in the XLR-V. It was a nice place to do business. Similarly, I don't think that a 440hp V8 was underpowered for a C5 variant. It's just that it's primary conpetition was in-house and a well-established name.

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    I could see this car as some kind of Audi TT competitor if it had a different power-train.

     

    But wait... it's probably a segment better covered by Buick. And the Buick Cascada is not the optimal attempt to compete there.

     

    And uh, I gotta tell you, the poolside commercial wasn't universally praised. At first I liked it.

     

    But then I thought, Cadillac should not be carrying some smug baggage, because if the company tries to tie itself to some past American ideal, then it just keeps holding itself back.

     

    I would like Cadillac to not even mention the past, atleast not the last 4 decades. In between those pockets you find some great Cadillacs, but it was an overall decline. 

     

    Being quietly smug while watching the segment incumbents scratch their heads, and then laughing in the security of a bank vault - yeah, I'm okay with that. 

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    They overpaid Bulgari for the gauges. But I have fonder memories of the interior, especially in the XLR-V. It was a nice place to do business. Similarly, I don't think that a 440hp V8 was underpowered for a C5 variant. It's just that it's primary conpetition was in-house and a well-established name.

    Yeah...440 horses for a C5 is definitely not under powered...

     I forgot about the V variant.  

     

    I still wanna see a XLR down the road, but as a BMW Z5 competitor rather than a M-B SL roadster competitor.

     

    I still wanna see an ELR down the road. But a 100% all electric Karma Fisker type body Cadillac...4 doors and sexy.  Or 2 doors and sexy. Like a new Aston Martin DB10.  Not that the outgoing ELR aint sexy, but it aint long hood/short deck and majestic kind of sexy.

    Edited by oldshurst442
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    I didn't think the poolside ad was all that great. First off you have a dressed up Chevy Volt, not exactly aspirational. And even the statement out people going on vacation for a month is a shot at Europeans, yet the Europeans have been beating Cadillac for over 30 years.

    I tend to like ads that promote your own brand image and own product and don't even mention anyone else. For example, you don't see Apple ads that talk about Samsung and how you can get an iPhone cheaper than a Galaxy. Apple sticks to their logo and their image and ignores the rest.

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    Pool side ad was good, no better than what MB or BMW has done. 

     

    No your wrong SMK, this is not a dressed up VOLT, you can put them side by side and they clearly are not the same. The interior was decades better than the volt. Exterior made a clear A&S statement.

     

    On top of this how can you say this about the ELR when MB has clearly done this with multiple models of just dressing up a pig with lipstick.

    2016 ELR and Volt

    post-12-0-59913500-1454608489_thumb.jpg

    2015 Volt more equal to 2016 ELR but still very different.

    post-12-0-13251300-1454610808_thumb.jpg

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    ^^^ You're comparing the wrong Volt there. The 2nd gen Volt shares almost nothing with the ELR.

    True, good catch, Updated post with the 2015 Volt that does share more in common being powertrain but otherwise nothing else. Different sheet metal, different interior. Cars were very different.

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    They overpaid Bulgari for the gauges. But I have fonder memories of the interior, especially in the XLR-V. It was a nice place to do business. Similarly, I don't think that a 440hp V8 was underpowered for a C5 variant. It's just that it's primary conpetition was in-house and a well-established name.

     

     

     

    True that. The Issue with the XLR is that it, like the ELR, existed with a new better version of itself under the skin over at CHEVY. WTF!!!??? The XLR was based on the C5, introed in 2003, while the C6 Corvette debuted in 2004. The deal should have been done where the C6 tech and platform debuted under the XLR.. then onward to the Chevy.. same as the ELR coming after the Volt. In that situation the XLR.. the now flagship of Cadillac and kinda GM, was behind the flagship of Chevy. The 320HP Northstar was smooooooooth.. smooth as butter.. and the VSeries version with 443HP was even better. Bit neither held a candle in HP to the LS2 (400HP), and certainly not the LS3 (436HP). Then what made it worse was the debut of the LS7 in 2005 as the new Z06. OK..OK.. How the XLR could have been made a winner:

     

    1) Styling was, imo, perfect.. better than the C6, where it died for me was the fact that I hate HARD-TOP convertibles. Adding an optional soft-top convertible in contrasting colors would have been primo. A White XLR with a burgundy or tan top??? Ahhhhhhhhhh.. I just creamed

     

    2) Interior. The interior of all Cadillacs at that time were comprised of some damn nice materials. The issue with the XLR was that it incorporated a lot of the CTS (Gen 1) and SRX (Gen 1) A&S Styling INSIDE the car. IF teh XLR had of had the Gen 2 A&S it would have been fine. COuld U imagine a revived GM.. .revived Cadillac ELR type interior in the XLR? How about the sweet supple look of the new CT6 or even XT5?

     

    3) Engine. Eff my long windid-ness.. The XLR should have had the Small-Block. or at the very least the 443HP version of the SC NorthStar should have been the (detuned)base engine.. and the LS7, as an interim engine should have been the VSeries. As soon as the LSA debuted in the entry-level Cadillac (at the time) CTS-V it should have been in the XLR. The LS9 shoudl have been in an XLR Super-V or rather.. the VSport name should have been introed then and the line would have been:

     

    XLR 400HP 4.4L SC NS(2004-2007) 430HP 6.2L LS3(2008-2013) (Meaning it should still be avail) 430HP TT3.6L (2014+)

     

    XLR-VSport  443HP NStarSC (2004-2007) 500HP LS7  (2008-2013) 556HP LSA

     

     

    XLR-VSeried (2004-2007) 500HP LS7  (2008-2013) 635HP LS9 (2014+) 640HP SC LT4

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    ^^^

     

    Casa's speech just proves to me that the XLR was a half-baked idea...

     

    1. Corvette under the skin or not...in which the Chevy was better than it or not...

    And I forgot....thanx Casa for the reminder....the C6 was debuting...maybe the XLR should have been a C6 instead of the C5 under the skin...

    Visions of Mercedes Benz old roadster and old engine being transferred to Chrysler for the Crossfire...and we all know how that turned out for Chryco and the Crossfire....so why would THIS situation be any different? 

     

    2. Engines being what they are...a supercharged Northstar SHOULD have been the standard engine in the XLR....and like Casa states, why shouldnt the 505 HP  V8  been a part of the XLR?

    Because its a Chevy engine?  That did  not stopped Cadillac from using that particualr Chevy V8 engine later...

     

    3. The interiors of GM at that point in time...well, we all know what it was...no need to go back there.

    Sure, maybe Cadillac had some nice materials then, people did not notice, because whether Bvlgari was over paid or design simply sucked, the interior of the XLR simply did not woooo and wow anybody. Like I said...half assed rather than half-baked. The C5's interior might have been cheap, it was better than the C4...but at least it looked better than the XLR....it looked more sportier AND more elegant...

     

    How the eff could that be?

    Well, it was...

     

    And this is where the ELR comes in.

     

    While the ELR is a striking vehicle to look at...it aint majestic.

    Many people have different views on poolside: American arrogance, self indulgence, and over confidence is seen both positively  AND negatively by different people.

     

    The ELR WAS NOT the RIGHT car for that commercial.

     

    The ELR, while being a coupe, fits perfect for that stigma...its a GREEN oriented car.

    The looks itself, while beautiful, it aint IMPOSING enough.

    Its too small. Aston Martin cars are also small, but Aston Martins have a majestic look about them. They have that road presence as if they were a 5 ton SUV...The ELR does not possess that.

     

    Going back to the XLR...there was a sight lost in translation from the Evoq concept car.  The front end with the head lights and the back end with the fins that were prominent and the somewhat widebody effect were scaled back considerably on the XLR...

    Although the XLR was gorgeous, it lost all the Cadillac aggressive presence that made the Evoq such a jaw dropper...and the name just suited it perfectly...

    What we got was a watered down Arts and Science car with a name like XLR...a dirt and grime cleaner rather than such a befitting name for a Cadillac roadster...Evoq!

     

     

    Cadillac hopefully learns who they are, and maybe they could give the world what they want from Cadillac.

     

    Poolside is EXACTLY what people want from Cadillac.

    Including Europeans...

    Especially Saudis and Americans!

    Edited by oldshurst442
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    For the asking price of the ELR it should have performed like an ATS-V AND had the Volt's electric range.

    People are still not willing to pay a premium for electric cars with average or less than average performance. Tesla sells cars because they are faster than a Corvette. The P85D can accelerate like an Aventador and it is a 4 door sedan.

    XLR just had shortcuts all over the place. And that segment has basically died with the SL as the last car standing. Lexus SC and Jaguar XK died too.

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      But this where the good points end with the ATS-V’s interior. Despite all of the premium touches Cadillac has added, it doesn’t feel like it is worth the price. Take for example the center stack with CUE. It is just a sheet of piano black trim and makes the interior feel somewhat cheap. You’ll find more piano black trim throughout the interior which reinforces this. The instrument cluster is the same that you’ll find in the standard ATS only with a different font. It would have been nice if Cadillac could have pulled the 12.3-inch screen setup they use on the CTS-V as it looks nicer and would provide the key details needed for a driver. CUE still hasn’t gotten any better in terms of performance and overall usability. Yes, Cadillac has added Apple CarPlay and Android Auto integration to CUE. But we had issues with CarPlay with the system not recognizing our phone and apps crashing. The back seat? Just use it for storage. Trying to fit someone back there could cause you to be accused of cruel and unusual punishment.
      Power for the ATS-V comes from a twin-turbo 3.6L V6 with 464 horsepower and 445 pound-feet of torque. This can be paired with either a six-speed manual or our tester’s eight-speed automatic. Start up the engine and it delivers a meaty, if somewhat muted growl. Don’t let that fool you, this engine will throw you in the back of your seat with no issue. Yes, the turbos do mean you’ll have a moment or two for that rush of power to arrive. But once the turbos spool, hold on. Power comes on at a linear rate and never lets up. The eight-speed automatic delivers crisp upshifts, but it does take a second or so for it to downshift. If you’re wondering about fuel economy, the EPA rates the ATS-V automatic at 16 City/24 Highway/19 Combined. Our average for the week landed around 18 mpg.
      Where the ATS-V truly shines is in the handling. The first time I took the ATS-V down a curvy road, I was gobsmacked at how well it hustled around the corners with no issues. Enter into a corner and ATS-V hunkers down thanks to sticky Michelin Pilot Sport. There is little body roll and the steering provides quick and precise turn-in. The ATS was already a pretty decent handling car, but Cadillac knew that it could be better. The stiffness of the chassis has been increased by 25 percent and there is the newest version of GM’s Magnetic Ride Control system that is faster when it comes adjusting the damping characteristics of the shocks. Three modes (Touring, Sport, and Track) can vary the stiffness of the shocks along with the behavior of the engine and steering. 
      When you decided that you had enough fun and it is time to go back to the daily grind, the ATS-V turns into a comfortable cruiser. With the vehicle in Touring mode, the ride is compliant with some bumps making their way inside. Road and wind noise is kept to very acceptable levels.
      One item that we were disappointed not to have on our test ATS-V was blind spot monitoring. This is part of a $1,500 Safety and Security package that also adds lane keep assist, forward collision alert, rear-cross traffic alert, and more. For a vehicle that begins that begins just a hair over $62,000, you think blind spot monitor would be standard. It should.
      Cadillac has been making great strides since the first-generation CTS-V and the ATS-V is the beneficiary of it. The powertrains will nail you to your seats and the handling can match or surpass the class leaders. But Cadillac is still stumbling over some simple things such as the interior materials and the infotainment system. It is an amazing driving vehicle, but it is let down by the interior.
      At the end of the week, I couldn’t deny this is an impressive vehicle even with the interior issues. It was very much worth the long wait.
      Cheers: Jaw-Dropping performance, Sharp handling, Looks that make it stand out from the crowd
      Jeers: Carbon Fiber package isn't worth the money or worry, Interior doesn't feel like it is worth the price, CUE
      Disclaimer: Cadillac Provided the ATS-V, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2016
      Make: Cadillac
      Model: ATS-V Coupe
      Trim: N/A
      Engine: 3.6L SIDI DOHC Twin-Turbo V6
      Driveline: Eight-Speed Automatic, Rear-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 464 @ 5,850
      Torque @ RPM: 445 @ 3,500
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 16/24/19
      Curb Weight: 3,803 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Lansing, MI
      Base Price: $62,665
      As Tested Price: $79,205 (Includes $995.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Carbon Fiber Package - $5,000.00
      Recaro Performance Seats - $2,300.00
      Luxury Package - $2,100.00
      8-Speed Automatic Transmission - $2,000.00
      Performance Data Recorder - $1,300.00
      Power Sunroof - $1,050.00
      18-inch Polished Wheels - $900.00
      Dark Gold Brembo Calipers - $595.00
      Sueded Microfiber Steering Wheels and Shifter - $300.00

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      It has been about five years since a Cadillac V series model has graced either one the Cheers & Gears’ garages (if you’re wondering, that would be the 2011 CTS-V Coupe that our Managing Editor drove). It isn’t for our lack of trying. I can give you a stack of emails to the person who handles General Motors’ fleet in Detroit that list the ATS-V and CTS-V as a possible test vehicle. But if you keep bugging someone over time, something is bound to change. That is what happened this summer as a Cadillac ATS-V coupe rolled into the Cheers and Gears’ Detroit garage. Was it worth the wait? 
      The standard Cadillac ATS coupe is already a model that stands out in crowd thanks to an aggressive look. The V turns that aggressiveness up to eleven. The front features a dual mesh grille setup (a small one on top and a larger one below), a narrow slot between the grille and hood; and a new bulging hood with an air extractor. A set of optional eighteen-inch alloy wheels fill in the wheel wells nicely and show off the massive Brembo brakes. The back comes with a rear wing and diffuser with quad exhaust tips.
      Our ATS-V tester featured the optional Carbon Fiber package that adds an exposed carbon fiber weave for the front splitter, hood extractor, and rear diffuser. It also comes with a larger rear wing and extensions for the rocker panels. I’ll admit I found the carbon fiber package to be a bit much with our tester’s red paint at first. It’s like going into an important meeting wearing a zoot suit and alligator shoes. You’ll make an impression, but is it the one you want to put out into the world? I did grow to like this combination as the week went on. That said, I would skip the carbon fiber package. For one, you have to very careful not cause any damage to lower parts when driving over speed bumps and other road imperfections. For example, the low ride height makes it easy for the front splitter to be cracked. Second, this optional package is $5,000. There are better ways you can use that $5,000 such as getting a new set of tires or a plane ticket to get you over to Cadillac’s V driving school.
      Inside, the ATS-V is a bit of a disappointment. For the nearly $80,000 price tag of our tester, you would think that it would look and feel the part. In certain areas, the ATS-V does. Cadillac has appointed parts of the interior with carbon fiber and suede to give it a sporty feel. Our tester featured the optional Recaro seats which are the first set I actually liked sitting in. A lot of this is due to how you could adjust seat bolstering to make yourself actually fit into the seat, not sitting on top of it. 
      But this where the good points end with the ATS-V’s interior. Despite all of the premium touches Cadillac has added, it doesn’t feel like it is worth the price. Take for example the center stack with CUE. It is just a sheet of piano black trim and makes the interior feel somewhat cheap. You’ll find more piano black trim throughout the interior which reinforces this. The instrument cluster is the same that you’ll find in the standard ATS only with a different font. It would have been nice if Cadillac could have pulled the 12.3-inch screen setup they use on the CTS-V as it looks nicer and would provide the key details needed for a driver. CUE still hasn’t gotten any better in terms of performance and overall usability. Yes, Cadillac has added Apple CarPlay and Android Auto integration to CUE. But we had issues with CarPlay with the system not recognizing our phone and apps crashing. The back seat? Just use it for storage. Trying to fit someone back there could cause you to be accused of cruel and unusual punishment.
      Power for the ATS-V comes from a twin-turbo 3.6L V6 with 464 horsepower and 445 pound-feet of torque. This can be paired with either a six-speed manual or our tester’s eight-speed automatic. Start up the engine and it delivers a meaty, if somewhat muted growl. Don’t let that fool you, this engine will throw you in the back of your seat with no issue. Yes, the turbos do mean you’ll have a moment or two for that rush of power to arrive. But once the turbos spool, hold on. Power comes on at a linear rate and never lets up. The eight-speed automatic delivers crisp upshifts, but it does take a second or so for it to downshift. If you’re wondering about fuel economy, the EPA rates the ATS-V automatic at 16 City/24 Highway/19 Combined. Our average for the week landed around 18 mpg.
      Where the ATS-V truly shines is in the handling. The first time I took the ATS-V down a curvy road, I was gobsmacked at how well it hustled around the corners with no issues. Enter into a corner and ATS-V hunkers down thanks to sticky Michelin Pilot Sport. There is little body roll and the steering provides quick and precise turn-in. The ATS was already a pretty decent handling car, but Cadillac knew that it could be better. The stiffness of the chassis has been increased by 25 percent and there is the newest version of GM’s Magnetic Ride Control system that is faster when it comes adjusting the damping characteristics of the shocks. Three modes (Touring, Sport, and Track) can vary the stiffness of the shocks along with the behavior of the engine and steering. 
      When you decided that you had enough fun and it is time to go back to the daily grind, the ATS-V turns into a comfortable cruiser. With the vehicle in Touring mode, the ride is compliant with some bumps making their way inside. Road and wind noise is kept to very acceptable levels.
      One item that we were disappointed not to have on our test ATS-V was blind spot monitoring. This is part of a $1,500 Safety and Security package that also adds lane keep assist, forward collision alert, rear-cross traffic alert, and more. For a vehicle that begins that begins just a hair over $62,000, you think blind spot monitor would be standard. It should.
      Cadillac has been making great strides since the first-generation CTS-V and the ATS-V is the beneficiary of it. The powertrains will nail you to your seats and the handling can match or surpass the class leaders. But Cadillac is still stumbling over some simple things such as the interior materials and the infotainment system. It is an amazing driving vehicle, but it is let down by the interior.
      At the end of the week, I couldn’t deny this is an impressive vehicle even with the interior issues. It was very much worth the long wait.
      Cheers: Jaw-Dropping performance, Sharp handling, Looks that make it stand out from the crowd
      Jeers: Carbon Fiber package isn't worth the money or worry, Interior doesn't feel like it is worth the price, CUE
      Disclaimer: Cadillac Provided the ATS-V, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2016
      Make: Cadillac
      Model: ATS-V Coupe
      Trim: N/A
      Engine: 3.6L SIDI DOHC Twin-Turbo V6
      Driveline: Eight-Speed Automatic, Rear-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 464 @ 5,850
      Torque @ RPM: 445 @ 3,500
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 16/24/19
      Curb Weight: 3,803 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Lansing, MI
      Base Price: $62,665
      As Tested Price: $79,205 (Includes $995.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Carbon Fiber Package - $5,000.00
      Recaro Performance Seats - $2,300.00
      Luxury Package - $2,100.00
      8-Speed Automatic Transmission - $2,000.00
      Performance Data Recorder - $1,300.00
      Power Sunroof - $1,050.00
      18-inch Polished Wheels - $900.00
      Dark Gold Brembo Calipers - $595.00
      Sueded Microfiber Steering Wheels and Shifter - $300.00
    • By William Maley
      Cadillac is offering 400 of its smallest dealers a buyout if they don't want to be part of the ambitious and contentious Project Pinnacle.
      Automotive News reports the offers will range from $100,000 to $180,000. The dealers eligible for the buyout sold less than 50 new Cadillac models in 2015. While the 400 dealers make up 43 percent of Cadillac's total number of dealers in the U.S. (around 925), this group only made up 9 percent of total sales last year.
      Cadillac President Johan de Nysschen said the buyouts is to give those an alternative who don't want to forward with the new program.
      “This is going to be a long, arduous and challenging journey and certainly not one for the faint-hearted. Some people may choose to make life a little easier than what lies ahead,” said de Nysschen.
      de Nysschen did say while Cadillac has too many dealers compared to their rivals, the buyout program isn't meant to be seen as a way to get rid of low-volume dealers. 
      Project Pinnacle is a new incentive program that will separate dealers into five tiers based on sales volume. Each tier offers a varying level of customer perk along with different requirements for services and facilities. For example, small stores cannot stock vehicles on site. Instead, they would offer a virtual showroom for customers to explore and order a vehicle. This program has gotten backlash from dealer groups, saying it would violate franchise laws and be unfair to the smaller dealers. 
      Those who have been offered the buyout have until November 21st to either take it or move forward with Project Pinnacle, which is expected to begin January 1st.
      Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required)
       

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      Cadillac is offering 400 of its smallest dealers a buyout if they don't want to be part of the ambitious and contentious Project Pinnacle.
      Automotive News reports the offers will range from $100,000 to $180,000. The dealers eligible for the buyout sold less than 50 new Cadillac models in 2015. While the 400 dealers make up 43 percent of Cadillac's total number of dealers in the U.S. (around 925), this group only made up 9 percent of total sales last year.
      Cadillac President Johan de Nysschen said the buyouts is to give those an alternative who don't want to forward with the new program.
      “This is going to be a long, arduous and challenging journey and certainly not one for the faint-hearted. Some people may choose to make life a little easier than what lies ahead,” said de Nysschen.
      de Nysschen did say while Cadillac has too many dealers compared to their rivals, the buyout program isn't meant to be seen as a way to get rid of low-volume dealers. 
      Project Pinnacle is a new incentive program that will separate dealers into five tiers based on sales volume. Each tier offers a varying level of customer perk along with different requirements for services and facilities. For example, small stores cannot stock vehicles on site. Instead, they would offer a virtual showroom for customers to explore and order a vehicle. This program has gotten backlash from dealer groups, saying it would violate franchise laws and be unfair to the smaller dealers. 
      Those who have been offered the buyout have until November 21st to either take it or move forward with Project Pinnacle, which is expected to begin January 1st.
      Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required)
       
    • By William Maley
      More and more automakers are beginning to roll out high-performance driving schools to those who purchase one of their performance vehicles. Cadillac is the latest one.
      Starting with the 2017 Cadillac ATS-V and CTS-V, buyers will be eligible for a two-day course at Cadillac's V-Performance Academy. The Academy is based at Spring Mountain Motor Resort and Country Club near Las Vegas, Nevada. The course "is designed for drivers of all experience levels and includes dynamic car control exercises, visual skill development, and proper cornering techniques." There will also be time in the classroom to explain various things.
      We'll admit Cadillac's V-Performance Academy is quite the steal as the brand will cover a two-night stay in one of the Spring Mountain on-site condos, along with breakfast and lunch. All you need to do is buy the plane ticket to get to Las Vegas.
      Source: Cadillac
      Press Release is on Page 2


      Cadillac Announces V-Performance Academy
      Two-day driver training included with every 2017 V-Series Cadillac today announced the Cadillac V-Performance Academy driving experience at Spring Mountain Motor Resort and Country Club near Las Vegas, Nevada. The two-day driver training program will be included in the purchase of any of Cadillac’s high-performance V-Series models: 2017 Cadillac ATS-V Sedan, 2017 ATS-V Coupe and 2017 Cadillac CTS-V sedan.
      Cadillac is the only luxury automotive brand offering a two-day driver training with the purchase of a high-performance vehicle. Customers will register online for the experience after taking delivery of a 2017 V-Series model. The V-Performance Academy program may also be purchased as a stand-alone experience.
      “Cadillac is a brand for passionate people, by passionate people,” said Nathan Tan, associate director of Brand Partnerships and Experiences for Cadillac. “V-Series customers are in many ways nearest the core of the Cadillac brand, and we are proud to offer this valuable training with our thrilling products.”
      The V-Performance Academy includes:
      Ground transportation to and from Las Vegas McCarren International Airport — customers are responsible for airfare Two days of intensive driver training in the model of purchase for 2017 V-Series owners and the model of choice for stand-alone customers Two nights’ lodging in the Spring Mountain luxury condominiums Breakfast and lunch on both training days General admission access for one designated guest — add a driving guest for an additional fee On-site courtesy vehicles will be provided There are now two opportunities for enthusiasts to drive new V-Series models on a racetrack: the two-day V-Performance Academy driver training held exclusively at Spring Mountain and the single-day V-Performance Lab, which travels to different racetracks around the country. In 2016, the V-Performance Labs will be held at Lime Rock Park in Lakeville, Connecticut, and Circuit of the Americas in Austin, Texas. The development of the V-Performance Academy curriculum was overseen by V-Series engineers. The tailored driver training enables attendees to extract maximum performance from the V-Series vehicles.
      “The V-Series are the most-track capable Cadillac models ever, using exclusive technologies tuned by a select group of dedicated engineers,” said Brandon Vivian, Cadillac executive chief engineer. “These technologies, such as Magnetic Ride Control, Performance Traction Management software and the Performance Data Recorder, set the Cadillac ATS-V and Cadillac CTS-V apart from all other luxury cars and are the tools drivers will experience at the V-Performance Academy.”

      View full article
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