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    William Maley

    2016 Chevrolet Volt Gets Rated By the EPA

      The Numbers Are In for the 2016 Chevrolet Volt and They Are Impressive


    Today, Chevrolet and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have released the numbers for the 2016 Volt and they are noticeably better than the outgoing model.

     

    The EPA rates the Volt at 106 Miles Per Gallon Equivalent (MPGe) combined when operating solely on electricity, and 42 MPG combined when the gas engine is running. To put this into perspective, the current Volt gets 98 MPGe when running on electricity and 39 MPG combined when the gas engine is running.

     

    Overall electric range has seen a big jump as well with the 2016 Volt. The EPA says the model will deliver 53 Miles of range on electric power alone. That is a huge increase compared to the 39 Miles of total electric range on the current Volt.

     

    “We listened to our customers. They were very clear when they told us that they wanted more range, and a fun driving experience behind the wheel. We are confident that the 2016 Volt delivers both,” said Andrew Farah, vehicle chief engineer for the Volt.

     

    Source: Chevrolet

     

    Press Release is on Page 2


     

    The Results Are In: More Range for the 2016 Volt

    • EPA-estimated pure electric range is 53 miles


    DETROIT – The 2016 Volt is engineered to offer customers more of what they want: range, range and more range.
    The Volt’s all-new second-generation Voltec extended-range electric propulsion system delivers 53 miles of pure EV range, based on EPA testing. That is nearly a 40-percent improvement over the first-generation Volt.
    Chevrolet expects many next-generation Volt owners will use power solely from their batteries for more than 90 percent of trips. Today, Volt owners use battery power on 80 percent of their trips.
    This means the average Volt owner could expect to travel well over 1,000 miles between gas fill ups, if they charge regularly.
    For the first 53 miles, the Volt can drive gas and tailpipe-emissions free using a full charge of electricity stored in its new 18.4-kWh lithium-ion battery, rated at a combined 106 MPGe, or gasoline equivalent. When the Volt’s battery runs low, a gas-powered generator seamlessly operates to extend the driving range for a total of 420 miles on a full tank.
    “We listened to our customers,” said Andrew Farah, vehicle chief engineer, “They were very clear when they told us that they wanted more range, and a fun driving experience behind the wheel. We are confident that the 2016 Volt delivers both.”
    The next-generation Volt’s new 1.5L range-extender, designed to use regular unleaded fuel, offers a combined EPA-estimated fuel efficiency of 42 MPG.
    Data shows that drivers of the first-generation Volt achieved, and often exceeded, the published EPA-estimated mileage. Chevrolet expects the same label-exceeding result with the next-generation Volt.


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    42 mpg on gas isn't particularly impressive, but it's important to note that first gen owners actually GOT the rated efficiency. A lot of hybrids advertising 45+ mpg can't say that. 53 miles on battery charge is quite nice, though.

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    42 mpg on gas isn't particularly impressive, but it's important to note that first gen owners actually GOT the rated efficiency. A lot of hybrids advertising 45+ mpg can't say that. 53 miles on battery charge is quite nice, though.

    42mpg combined is what the writeup says. At least I took that as City/Highway/Combined - and the 42 was the "combined".

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    42 mpg on gas isn't particularly impressive, but it's important to note that first gen owners actually GOT the rated efficiency. A lot of hybrids advertising 45+ mpg can't say that. 53 miles on battery charge is quite nice, though.

    42mpg combined is what the writeup says. At least I took that as City/Highway/Combined - and the 42 was the "combined".

     

     

    I know it's 42 combined. A lot of hybrids, especially dedicated ones like the Prius, are higher than that.

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    42 mpg on gas isn't particularly impressive, but it's important to note that first gen owners actually GOT the rated efficiency. A lot of hybrids advertising 45+ mpg can't say that. 53 miles on battery charge is quite nice, though.

    42mpg combined is what the writeup says. At least I took that as City/Highway/Combined - and the 42 was the "combined".

     

     

    I know it's 42 combined. A lot of hybrids, especially dedicated ones like the Prius, are higher than that.

     

    Oh I gotcha I gotcha..

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    Future will be cars like the VOLT and BOLT as the Gov pushes to do away with Petrol auto's. I saw a VOLT gen 1 that had the generator motor converted to run CNG, so pretty clean for an alternative Hybrid.

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    a good friend who owns a Volt says he gets 45 mpg on gas on his right now, and that is on long highway trip with 4 ppl inside.  actually he says the mileage is pretty much 40+ no matter what when just running on gas.  If the new one is better.....

     

    I actually looked at a used 2013 Volt a couple weeks ago, and test drove it, it got sold (it was a screaming deal) but one thing that was in my mind is should a person wait till the range and mpg get even better yet.  I really think a cruze diesel, or a volt, or even the new Malibu hybrid will all be good ways to drive with less fuel / elec.  The used volt was getting really cheap.........

     

    i would be all go on a current Cruze diesel but the 2017 has the chance to get better mpg yet.  For me the question i ask myself is whether i really want every day to have to plug the thing in (PITA) and how the volt ultimately does in winter.

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    Over in CF we used to have a Volt owner who lived in Toronto. He loved the thing.

    My dad would have bought one, closer to when they came out, for my mom. The concept is fantastic. He doesn't want full electric and the range issue, my mom lives 3 miles from her job(never even use gas), but they drive to my sister's in Iowa every couple of months(6hrs one way) or visit my brother at school(2+hrs one way). The only thing that kept him from buying one was the price. He's a very practical man and ran the numbers and it didn't logically make sense with the vehicle price so high still and the unknown of the brand new vehicle. They ended up with a '12 Fusion with the 2.5l.Nice car but I wish they would have held off till the '13's came out.

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    42 mpg on gas isn't particularly impressive, but it's important to note that first gen owners actually GOT the rated efficiency. A lot of hybrids advertising 45+ mpg can't say that. 53 miles on battery charge is quite nice, though.

     

    MPG in the Volt is a lot more "your mileage may vary" than standard gas cars.   It greatly depends on the terrain and driving style.   Heading east bound on the Penna TPK end to end, you can get into the 70+mpg range.  Heading westbound you'll just get EPA rating.   Why?  Because the Volt can effectively re-fuel on the downhill stretches and use that for the uphill.  Eastbound there is more downhill than uphill, so the Volt spends a lot more time regenerating its batteries via the car's inertia rather than the gas engine.  

     

    Because it has more battery capacity and power than a regular hybrid, the Volt gets to take greater advantage of the downward momentum.   Regular hybrids like the Fusion or Pruis can have their batteries recharged rather quickly on the downhill sections, and once those batteries are full, the excess energy is wasted as heat. 

     

    The 42mpg EPA rating is actually a bit of a disservice to the Volt since the actual results can vary so widely.... it needs to be more of a range of efficiency rather than a single number. 

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    a good friend who owns a Volt says he gets 45 mpg on gas on his right now, and that is on long highway trip with 4 ppl inside.  actually he says the mileage is pretty much 40+ no matter what when just running on gas.  If the new one is better.....

     

    I actually looked at a used 2013 Volt a couple weeks ago, and test drove it, it got sold (it was a screaming deal) but one thing that was in my mind is should a person wait till the range and mpg get even better yet.  I really think a cruze diesel, or a volt, or even the new Malibu hybrid will all be good ways to drive with less fuel / elec.  The used volt was getting really cheap.........

     

    i would be all go on a current Cruze diesel but the 2017 has the chance to get better mpg yet.  For me the question i ask myself is whether i really want every day to have to plug the thing in (PITA) and how the volt ultimately does in winter.

     

    My test with the Volt was in winter time and it was fantastic.  Just schlepping around town and plugging it in at night I got something like 700mpg since I never used the gas.   I have a garage, so plugging it in wasn't an issue... pull in, close the door, pop the plug cover, plug it in, go inside.

     

    The great thing (possibly my favorite thing) about the Volt was the ability to turn it on remotely and have it pre-heat itself off of house current even with the garage door closed.

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    a good friend who owns a Volt says he gets 45 mpg on gas on his right now, and that is on long highway trip with 4 ppl inside.  actually he says the mileage is pretty much 40+ no matter what when just running on gas.  If the new one is better.....

     

    I actually looked at a used 2013 Volt a couple weeks ago, and test drove it, it got sold (it was a screaming deal) but one thing that was in my mind is should a person wait till the range and mpg get even better yet.  I really think a cruze diesel, or a volt, or even the new Malibu hybrid will all be good ways to drive with less fuel / elec.  The used volt was getting really cheap.........

     

    i would be all go on a current Cruze diesel but the 2017 has the chance to get better mpg yet.  For me the question i ask myself is whether i really want every day to have to plug the thing in (PITA) and how the volt ultimately does in winter.

     

    My test with the Volt was in winter time and it was fantastic.  Just schlepping around town and plugging it in at night I got something like 700mpg since I never used the gas.   I have a garage, so plugging it in wasn't an issue... pull in, close the door, pop the plug cover, plug it in, go inside.

     

    The great thing (possibly my favorite thing) about the Volt was the ability to turn it on remotely and have it pre-heat itself off of house current even with the garage door closed.

     

    Whoa. That's awesome.

     

    I really like the idea of te plug-in hybrid design. I like it more than any other hybrid drivetrain out there, as of now at least.

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    42 mpg on gas isn't particularly impressive, but it's important to note that first gen owners actually GOT the rated efficiency. A lot of hybrids advertising 45+ mpg can't say that. 53 miles on battery charge is quite nice, though.

     

     

     

    The 42mpg EPA rating is actually a bit of a disservice to the Volt since the actual results can vary so widely.... it needs to be more of a range of efficiency rather than a single number. 

     

     

     

    The rating was done on a conservative side because since day one, everything pertaining to this car has been a political maelstrom to disservice GM. In the current Volt I have friends and colleagues that see 50MPG regularly when the EV is done. I'm betting smart money that this one is gonna beat that number by at least 10 in tests.

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    42 mpg on gas isn't particularly impressive, but it's important to note that first gen owners actually GOT the rated efficiency. A lot of hybrids advertising 45+ mpg can't say that. 53 miles on battery charge is quite nice, though.

     

     

     

    The 42mpg EPA rating is actually a bit of a disservice to the Volt since the actual results can vary so widely.... it needs to be more of a range of efficiency rather than a single number. 

     

     

     

    The rating was done on a conservative side because since day one, everything pertaining to this car has been a political maelstrom to disservice GM. In the current Volt I have friends and colleagues that see 50MPG regularly when the EV is done. I'm betting smart money that this one is gonna beat that number by at least 10 in tests.

     

     

    I have friends that have a Volt and only fill up 3 times a year, but still do 15,000 miles a year.  They're just in the perfect part of the segment with 30 mile round trip commutes.

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    With my 24 mile round trip commute, five days a week, the Volt is the perfect kind of car for a guy like me. Would save me so much money in the long run.

     

    If you don't mind leasing, the deals on the Volt really would save you money.

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    With my 24 mile round trip commute, five days a week, the Volt is the perfect kind of car for a guy like me. Would save me so much money in the long run.

     

    If you don't mind leasing, the deals on the Volt really would save you money.

     

    Very true but I tend to keep my cars for more than a few years these days so financing one is not a big deal for me.

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    With my 24 mile round trip commute, five days a week, the Volt is the perfect kind of car for a guy like me. Would save me so much money in the long run.

     

    If you don't mind leasing, the deals on the Volt really would save you money.

     

    Very true but I tend to keep my cars for more than a few years these days so financing one is not a big deal for me.

     

     

    True, but run the numbers.  You usually get the full force of the tax credit built right in and GM likes leasing them. 

     

    My friends ended up leasing theirs so cheap, the savings in fuel costs each month (they came from an old Pathfiner or 4Runner) completely covered the monthly leasing costs.  It also only increased their electric bill about $35 a month.

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    42 mpg on gas isn't particularly impressive, but it's important to note that first gen owners actually GOT the rated efficiency. A lot of hybrids advertising 45+ mpg can't say that. 53 miles on battery charge is quite nice, though.

     

     

     

    The 42mpg EPA rating is actually a bit of a disservice to the Volt since the actual results can vary so widely.... it needs to be more of a range of efficiency rather than a single number.

     

     

    The rating was done on a conservative side because since day one, everything pertaining to this car has been a political maelstrom to disservice GM. In the current Volt I have friends and colleagues that see 50MPG regularly when the EV is done. I'm betting smart money that this one is gonna beat that number by at least 10 in tests.

    And THIS is why you don't try and squeeze every last molecule of fuel in a quest for paper mpg numbers and then shout it from the rafters. This car is a technological marvel, but we can't discount the fact that GM's conservative approach has helped the car punch above its weight mileage-wise.

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    42 mpg on gas isn't particularly impressive, but it's important to note that first gen owners actually GOT the rated efficiency. A lot of hybrids advertising 45+ mpg can't say that. 53 miles on battery charge is quite nice, though.

     

    MPG in the Volt is a lot more "your mileage may vary" than standard gas cars.   It greatly depends on the terrain and driving style.   Heading east bound on the Penna TPK end to end, you can get into the 70+mpg range.  Heading westbound you'll just get EPA rating.   Why?  Because the Volt can effectively re-fuel on the downhill stretches and use that for the uphill.  Eastbound there is more downhill than uphill, so the Volt spends a lot more time regenerating its batteries via the car's inertia rather than the gas engine.  

     

    Because it has more battery capacity and power than a regular hybrid, the Volt gets to take greater advantage of the downward momentum.   Regular hybrids like the Fusion or Pruis can have their batteries recharged rather quickly on the downhill sections, and once those batteries are full, the excess energy is wasted as heat. 

     

    The 42mpg EPA rating is actually a bit of a disservice to the Volt since the actual results can vary so widely.... it needs to be more of a range of efficiency rather than a single number. 

     

    that is a good explanation telling how sophisticated it is 

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    a good friend who owns a Volt says he gets 45 mpg on gas on his right now, and that is on long highway trip with 4 ppl inside.  actually he says the mileage is pretty much 40+ no matter what when just running on gas.  If the new one is better.....

     

    I actually looked at a used 2013 Volt a couple weeks ago, and test drove it, it got sold (it was a screaming deal) but one thing that was in my mind is should a person wait till the range and mpg get even better yet.  I really think a cruze diesel, or a volt, or even the new Malibu hybrid will all be good ways to drive with less fuel / elec.  The used volt was getting really cheap.........

     

    i would be all go on a current Cruze diesel but the 2017 has the chance to get better mpg yet.  For me the question i ask myself is whether i really want every day to have to plug the thing in (PITA) and how the volt ultimately does in winter.

     

    My test with the Volt was in winter time and it was fantastic.  Just schlepping around town and plugging it in at night I got something like 700mpg since I never used the gas.   I have a garage, so plugging it in wasn't an issue... pull in, close the door, pop the plug cover, plug it in, go inside.

     

    The great thing (possibly my favorite thing) about the Volt was the ability to turn it on remotely and have it pre-heat itself off of house current even with the garage door closed.

     

    now that is EXTREMELY appealing, is there a safeguard in place so that under no condition the gas engine will start in that scenario?

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    a good friend who owns a Volt says he gets 45 mpg on gas on his right now, and that is on long highway trip with 4 ppl inside.  actually he says the mileage is pretty much 40+ no matter what when just running on gas.  If the new one is better.....

     

    I actually looked at a used 2013 Volt a couple weeks ago, and test drove it, it got sold (it was a screaming deal) but one thing that was in my mind is should a person wait till the range and mpg get even better yet.  I really think a cruze diesel, or a volt, or even the new Malibu hybrid will all be good ways to drive with less fuel / elec.  The used volt was getting really cheap.........

     

    i would be all go on a current Cruze diesel but the 2017 has the chance to get better mpg yet.  For me the question i ask myself is whether i really want every day to have to plug the thing in (PITA) and how the volt ultimately does in winter.

     

    My test with the Volt was in winter time and it was fantastic.  Just schlepping around town and plugging it in at night I got something like 700mpg since I never used the gas.   I have a garage, so plugging it in wasn't an issue... pull in, close the door, pop the plug cover, plug it in, go inside.

     

    The great thing (possibly my favorite thing) about the Volt was the ability to turn it on remotely and have it pre-heat itself off of house current even with the garage door closed.

     

    now that is EXTREMELY appealing, is there a safeguard in place so that under no condition the gas engine will start in that scenario?

     

     

    When it is plugged in, the gas engine will not start.  The only issue is if you forgot to plug in the car, then the gas motor could start, but due to a recall, it will now shut off after 10 minutes of no activity.  

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    With my 24 mile round trip commute, five days a week, the Volt is the perfect kind of car for a guy like me. Would save me so much money in the long run.

     

    If you don't mind leasing, the deals on the Volt really would save you money.

     

    Very true but I tend to keep my cars for more than a few years these days so financing one is not a big deal for me.

     

     

    True, but run the numbers.  You usually get the full force of the tax credit built right in and GM likes leasing them. 

     

    My friends ended up leasing theirs so cheap, the savings in fuel costs each month (they came from an old Pathfiner or 4Runner) completely covered the monthly leasing costs.  It also only increased their electric bill about $35 a month.

     

    That's always good to know. Thanks.

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    42 mpg on gas isn't particularly impressive, but it's important to note that first gen owners actually GOT the rated efficiency. A lot of hybrids advertising 45+ mpg can't say that. 53 miles on battery charge is quite nice, though.

     

     

     

    The 42mpg EPA rating is actually a bit of a disservice to the Volt since the actual results can vary so widely.... it needs to be more of a range of efficiency rather than a single number.

     

     

    The rating was done on a conservative side because since day one, everything pertaining to this car has been a political maelstrom to disservice GM. In the current Volt I have friends and colleagues that see 50MPG regularly when the EV is done. I'm betting smart money that this one is gonna beat that number by at least 10 in tests.

    And THIS is why you don't try and squeeze every last molecule of fuel in a quest for paper mpg numbers and then shout it from the rafters. This car is a technological marvel, but we can't discount the fact that GM's conservative approach has helped the car punch above its weight mileage-wise.

     

     

     

    Well I'm also sure they saw the out and out LYING of Hyundai on most of their POS line-up and Ford's Cmax and Fusion and said "no sir... tell the truth.. IN FACT.. under rate it." They did the same thing I think on ATS-V, CTS-V, Z06, Corvette, and Camaro performance numbers. Notice all of those vehicles are beating their manufacturer claims?

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