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  • William Maley
    William Maley

    Hyundai Cans Santa Fe Diesel For U.S.

      Also, no more third-row option

    Hyundai was planning on offering three different powertrains for the Santa Fe; the 2.4L four-cylinder as the base, an optional turbocharged 2.0L turbo-four, and a new 2.2L turbodiesel. The diesel would also be the only Santa Fe model to offer a third-row. But Green Car Reports has learned the diesel option has been canned.

    Brandon Ramirez, a spokesman for Hyundai confirmed the cancellation of the diesel during a first drive event of the Palisade in South Korea. The reason was due studies showing that consumers were not as willing to purchase a diesel as before. Likely helping this is the downward trend in gas prices and the increasing push into electrification. The departure of the diesel also means no option of a third-row for the Santa Fe according to Ramirez.

    This follows the announcement made by Kia back in October that the Sorento diesel option was canned.

    Source: Green Car Reports



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    Totally makes sense, Diesel is way more expensive than gas, the recovery of the cost of the Diesel Power Train just no longer makes any sense other than in full size Trucks / SUVs where towing and commercial work is needed.

    Days of consumer Rolling Coal will come to an end.

    Happy to see the smelly toxic fuel taken off the roads.

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    Diesel power built (and continues to build) this country.  It built the house you live in.  It hauls your food.  I would like to see you give up everything diesel power has provided for you.

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    10 minutes ago, ocnblu said:

    Diesel power built (and continues to build) this country.  It built the house you live in.  It hauls your food.  I would like to see you give up everything diesel power has provided for you.

    Does not mean we cannot use better ways to transport the supplies for building. The modern trains are all electric with very clean efficient diesel generators for now.

    I can honestly say that many parts of my house were delivered by clean Propane and Natural gas powered trucks. Garbage is all CNG powered trucks here, Diesel is dead in that industry here as is in the local delivery by Home depot, Lowes, UPS, FedEx. Non of them use diesel here, all CNG or CNG Hybrid trucks.

    For long haul, UPS and FedEx use LNG for their trucks here on the west coast.

    Clearly change for the better happens faster on the west coast than the east coast.

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    I am not much of a Hyundai fan...not impressed with thier gas powerplants not sure I would want one of thier diesels.

    8 hours ago, dfelt said:

    Totally makes sense, Diesel is way more expensive than gas, the recovery of the cost of the Diesel Power Train just no longer makes any sense other than in full size Trucks / SUVs where towing and commercial work is needed.

    Days of consumer Rolling Coal will come to an end.

    Happy to see the smelly toxic fuel taken off the roads.

    Heavy duty diesel trucks may indeed start going away en masse in my lifetime.

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    i don't think diesel is what people look to in a Sante Fe so this makes sense.

    Bigger question is Hyundai already has two underperforming motors in this otherwise nice new model.  Why do a third motor with limited consumer benefit when the optional turbo upgrade engine in a newly redesigned model is called out as underpowered and unrefined?

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