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    Hyundai Confirms Ten-Speed Automatics


    William Maley

    Editor/Reporter - CheersandGears.com

    January 20, 2012

    Back in September, we reported on Hyundai was developing ten-speed automatics for the Genesis and Equus sedans. Today, Hyundai has confirmed to Car & Driver, that yes they’re working on ten-speed automatics.

    “We confirmed that it [the ten-speed] is a ‘go project’ for development,” a Hyundai rep told Car & Driver.

    Hyundai isn’t saying when we’ll see the new transmission or what vehicles that it will be in. Car & Driver speculates that the new transmission could end up the Accent and Elantra.

    Source: Car & Driver

    Related:

    10 Speed Automatics Coming To Hyundai, Kia Vehicles

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    10 speed, just think of the costs of replacing one of these, I mean I spent nearly 4K to rebuild my 4 speed in my Riviera. These 8, 9, 10 speed trannys are getting a little ridiculous now.

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    Honestly beyond 6 speeds there is very little to be gained by introducing additional speeds. The fact, all the 7 and 8 speeders skip gears during normal driving should tell you something. Most of the efficiency advantageous from the 7 and 8 speed boxes come from the increased ratio spread -- difference in rato between 1st and the top gear. A typical 6-speed gearbox is ~6:1, whereas the 8-speeders reaches ~7:1.

    For the most parts, widening the ratio spread on a 6-speed gearbox will achieve the same efficiency goals. Performance wise, which is preferable depends on the engine type. A peaky, high reving engine will benefit from closer shifts, but an engine with a broad torque band will actually be faster if there are fewer shifts even if there is a larger rpm drop with each because you lose acceleration momentarily during each shift.

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    Honestly beyond 6 speeds there is very little to be gained by introducing additional speeds. The fact, all the 7 and 8 speeders skip gears during normal driving should tell you something. Most of the efficiency advantageous from the 7 and 8 speed boxes come from the increased ratio spread -- difference in rato between 1st and the top gear. A typical 6-speed gearbox is ~6:1, whereas the 8-speeders reaches ~7:1.

    For the most parts, widening the ratio spread on a 6-speed gearbox will achieve the same efficiency goals. Performance wise, which is preferable depends on the engine type. A peaky, high reving engine will benefit from closer shifts, but an engine with a broad torque band will actually be faster if there are fewer shifts even if there is a larger rpm drop with each because you lose acceleration momentarily during each shift.

    This.

    One of the things I notice about the DSG in the Beetle was how low in the RPM band the transmission keeps the engine during normal driving. It was like there was an invisible line at 2,050 rpm that the computer didn't want to cross. However, at high end highway speeds, it could have used another gear to continue to keep RPMs low.

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    This.

    One of the things I notice about the DSG in the Beetle was how low in the RPM band the transmission keeps the engine during normal driving. It was like there was an invisible line at 2,050 rpm that the computer didn't want to cross. However, at high end highway speeds, it could have used another gear to continue to keep RPMs low.

    The Borg-Warner dual clutch boxes used by VW-Audi Group actually do not have a wide ratio spread; it is pretty close ratioed. In fact, it is closer to a close ratio manual than a typical 6A. The DSG's geart ratios are as follows; the axle ratio varies depending on application (diesel cars have a taller axle ratio).

    • 1st : 4.04
    • 2nd : 2.37
    • 3rd : 1.56
    • 4th : 1.16
    • 5th : 0.85
    • 6th : 0.76
    • Ratio Spread : 5.32

    That it goes pretty low at cruise is simply the result of a relatively tall final drive and a control logic that wants to stay low unless prodded.

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    But it would be Cool to have a Caddy with a 10 or 12 speed tranny :P

    Just think of an Escalade with a large spread to handle both on road and off road better. :D

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    with 8 or 10 speeds it's not like it's gonna use all the speeds now. it can skip....2,4,5,7,9 whatever the engine decides it needs. it would have a wider spread of ratios to pick from, even if they are closely spaced. why would you need a 21 speed bike?

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    What is the expected number of OD gears in this 10-spd?

    How many OD gears does the mercedees 8-spd have?

    A lot of these mega-speed trans never see the higher gears, I'll bet (except on de-acceleration).

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    ^ Right- my brother's Allison 1000 6-spd barely shifts into 6th unless coasting on level super highways or long de-accelerations.

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    lets fill the entire space between flywheel to differential with a transmission!!! :D

    j/k

    Boy just think of the cost of rebuilding it and how long it would take, probably at least 2 if not 3 people working on a tranny the length of the auto :P

    ;)

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